ABUSE TRACKER

A digest of links to media coverage of clergy abuse. For recent coverage listed in this blog, read the full article in the newspaper or other media source by clicking “Read original article.” For earlier coverage, click the title to read the original article.

June 1, 2014

Victim of paedophile ‘hurt’ by Fox findings

AUSTRALIA
Sydney Morning Herald

June 2, 2014

Joanne McCarthy, Jason Gordon

A paedophile priest victim, whose evidence at the NSW Special Commission of Inquiry reduced people to tears, is ”hurt” and ”disappointed” by findings he says lack balance about Detective Chief Inspector Peter Fox and what he represents for child sexual abuse victims.

”I gave evidence to give a balanced view on what Peter has done,” said Daniel Feenan of Maitland. ”I hoped it would be reflected in the findings and it hasn’t been, which is why I’m speaking now.”

Mr Feenan’s statements to Detective Fox in 2003 led to the conviction of paedophile priest Jim Fletcher, one of two priests who were the subject of the inquiry.

”Peter needed to be made to account for what he put out there, but knowing the man, the reasoning behind what he did, I’ve got nothing but admiration for him,” Mr Feenan said. ”He was the shock we needed to get a commission.”

Commissioner Margaret Cunneen, SC, found the church first knew about Fletcher’s offending in 1976, the year Mr Feenan was born.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

UPDATED: Westlake pastor indicted in Lorain County on sex charges

OHIO
The Chronicle-Telegram

Filed on May 30, 2014 by Anna Merriman

ELYRIA — A prominent Westlake pastor has been indicted on multiple counts of molesting a child as far back as 2005.

Paul Endrei, 53, who lives in Avon, has been indicted on two counts of sexual battery and four counts of gross sexual imposition by a Lorain County grand jury.

Endrei is the pastor of Church on the Rise, a Christian church in Westlake which is called, “a church for the whole family,” according to its website.

The indictment states the molestation dates back to 2005 when Endrei allegedly had sexual contact with a child under 13 years old. The molestation also occurred in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2013, according to the indictment.

He also is accused of having sexual relations with the girl in 2010 while he was in a position of authority over her, according to the indictment.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Whistleblower’s child sex abuse claims: call for royal commission to investigate

AUSTRALIA
The Guardian (UK)

Australian Associated Press
theguardian.com, Saturday 31 May 2014

Evidence by a whistleblower, Peter Fox, about the alleged cover-up of child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church’s Maitland-Newcastle diocese should be investigated by the federal royal commission, the NSW Greens and survivor advocates say.

The NSW special commission of inquiry found that Detective Inspector Fox, who made allegations of a cover-up, was an unsatisfactory witness.

A small band of Fox’s supporters, who are challenging the inquiry’s findings, including abuse survivors’ families, rallied outside NSW Parliament House on Saturday.

The four-volume report, delivered on Friday, uncovered no evidence to show that senior police officers had tried to block investigations into child abuse.

It found that Fox was not a credible witness and it was appropriate for police to instruct him to cease his own investigations.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Final Vt. church misconduct cost: $30M

VERMONT
Rutland Herald

By Kevin O’Connor
Staff Writer | June 01,2014

When Vermont’s Catholic Church settled the last of a string of priest misconduct lawsuits a year ago, the final numbers — some 40 child sexual abuse cases in a near-bankrupting 11-year court saga — were immense.

And, until now, incomplete.

The last 12 plaintiffs to file claims against the statewide Roman Catholic Diocese resolved their civil cases in a January 2013 blanket settlement that lacked any public financial figures.

“The diocese has asked us not to specify the amount and we have agreed,” Burlington lawyer Jerome O’Neill, representing all but two of dozens of plaintiffs over the years, said at the time.

But in his new memoir, Dan Gilman of Rutland — who faced repeated abuse as a teenager while he was hospitalized for a paralyzing diving accident — reports the combined 2013 blanket settlement for the final dozen cases to be $6,750,000, with “each claimant’s amount to be decided by a special arbitrator.”

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Bishop McManus reflects on the past, future

WORCESTER (MA)
Telegram & Gazette

By Bronislaus B. Kush TELEGRAM & GAZETTE STAFF
bkush@telegram.com

WORCESTER — On March 3, 2004, Providence Auxiliary Bishop Robert Joseph McManus received a five paragraph letter from Archbishop Gabriel Montalvo — the Vatican’s apostolic nuncio to the United States — informing him that Pope John Paul II had formally decided to appoint him as Worcester’s fifth bishop.

The short note, which requested that Bishop McManus keep the matter confidential until the news was officially released six days later, confirmed a telephone conversation the two men had had two days earlier.

Though it’s a very special honor for a priest to be named chief shepherd of a diocese, it wasn’t the best of times to become a new bishop in the United States.

The clergy-abuse scandal was consuming the American church and Worcester was one of the dioceses at the heart of the controversy. …

Ten years after assuming the reins, Bishop McManus is generally credited with placing the local church on a solid financial footing, launching a major reorganization plan to cope with the shortage of clergymen, boosting interest in vocations, and getting lay and religious leaders to be more attentive to the spiritual needs of parishioners.

Recognizing that the sexual abuse crisis will haunt the church for years, Bishop McManus has also warned chancery officials and pastors to be continually on the watch for sexual predators.

While he said he believes the diocese is generally in good shape, the 62-year-old prelate said there are still many challenges to be undertaken including wooing back alienated worshippers and dealing with a tide of new immigrants.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Victims of abuse want action from pope

SOUTH AFRICA
Sunday Independent

June 1 2014
By Pinky Khoabane

Will Pope Francis now step up to the plate and decisively deal with the issue of the clergy’s sexual abuse, asks Pinky Khoabane.

As Pope Francis prepares to meet victims of sexual abuse by clergy, will he concede that the notion of abstinence has failed, and even more importantly, demand that priests facing accusations of sexual abuse be handed over to the law?

During a flight from Jerusalem last week, Francis announced he would be meeting with sexual abuse victims at the Vatican and declared the act of priests’ molestation of children equivalent to “a satanic mass”.

This meeting would be the first of this sort since the pope’s election in March last year.

Francis is quoted as saying “sexual abuse is such an ugly crime… because a priest who does this betrays the body of the Lord. It is like a satanic mass”.

Enough already!

By now victims and whistle-blowers of the Roman Catholic’s sexual scandals – details of which have exploded in the last 15 years or so – could do with more action and less of the emotive descriptions of what are plain unlawful acts which ought to be handed to law enforcement for prosecution.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.