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November 15, 2018

Best practices? ‘What is best for victims,’ says California bishop

BALTIMORE (MD)
Catholic News Service

November 15, 2018

By Mark Pattison

As the U.S. bishops, individually and collectively, pursue “best practices” in their dioceses and for the country on how to deal with another clerical sexual abuse scandal in their midst, Bishop Oscar Cantu of San Jose, California, said best practices are simply “what is best for victims.”

And, despite listening to victims of abuse tell their stories, determining what’s best may not be so clear cut.

“When the victim sees the name of their abuser on the list publicly, that helps them,” Bishop Cantu told Catholic News Service in a Nov. 14 interview following that day’s general session of the U.S. bishops’ meeting in Baltimore.

Further, when an abuse victim still holding on privately to the memory of past abuse sees the name of the abuser published in a list, “it emboldens them to come forward,” Bishop Cantu said.

Now, however, a new strain of thought has emerged that seeing the list of names, including that of a victim’s own abuser, is “another wounding. They’re retraumatized by listening to this horrible reality of abuse over and over,” he added. “It’s one of the things we’ve been told by professionals — so I assume that it’s correct — every time that we released a new list of names people feel retraumatized.”

This was one of the issues California’s bishops were wrestling with when the met jointly a couple of weeks prior to the U.S. bishops’ Nov. 12-14 meeting in Baltimore. “Can we agree on one single day for the release of names? It’s hard to do,” Bishop Cantu said.

In San Jose, he has released the names of credibly accused clergy. And “the list is live,” he said, meaning if a priest or deacon not already on the list is credibly accused, his name will be added.

Española man tells story of healing old wounds of sexual abuse at Santa Fe seminary

TAOS (NM)
Taos News

November 15, 2018

by Cody Hooks

Donald Naranjo had gone back to the seminary campus in Santa Fe only once since he was a teenager, but driving through the city, he still knew where to turn: make a right at the midcentury house with a double garage, go east about a mile, turn left.

Naranjo, now 70, was a sophomore in high school when he convinced his parents to let him heed a calling. He started his studies to be a priest at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary on the eastern edge of the city near the foothills. For a kid from the Española Valley, a devoutly Catholic and mostly Hispanic community about an hour north of the seminary, it was the kind of choice that makes a family proud.

“If you wanted to seek a vocation in the church, it was wonderful,” Naranjo said. “You’d be right there next to God.”

Naranjo’s mom, sitting behind the wheel of the family’s Ford Falcon, dropped her son off at the seminary in August 1963.

Illinois Catholic Church official rips handling of sex abuse cases

CHICAGO (IL)
WLS TV

November 14, 2018

By Chuck Goudie and Ross Weidner and Barb Markoff

A top official of a downstate diocese, who coordinates assistance to victims of priest sex abuse, on Wednesday castigated the Roman Catholic Church for the way misconduct cases are handled.

"At times it seems that protecting the institution is a higher goal than caring for victims" said Deacon Robert Sondag. "Bishops, you are ordained to lead the church. Years of prolonged mishandling of sexual abuse victims continues to plague the Catholic church. The checks and balances put in place in 2002 through the Dallas charter have been compromised" Deacon Sondag said.

Sondag, recently a diocesan chancellor as well, was speaking in Baltimore where the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops wrapped up its fall meeting.

"We are here today to call for a deeper reckoning and transparent reporting of the past and present mishandling of victims and their perpetrators" he said. "This can only be accomplished by the use of a truly independent auditor beholden to the good of the public, not to the Catholic Church as a client."

His call for independent, outside administration of the church crisis is unusual for two reasons: it comes from a current diocesan employee and it was unfurled at the announcement of a new lawsuit against the bishop's conference by six alleged victims of priest sexual abuse. The lawsuit alleges that church officials covered up the crimes of predator priests.

Survivors decry Vatican making US bishops wait on abuse vote

DUBLIN (IRELAND)
The Irish Catholic

November 15, 2018

Following Monday’s shock announcement that the Vatican has requested the US Catholic Bishops to delay voting on new standards for bishop accountability, survivors of sexual abuse and bishop accountability activists decried the move as “totally unacceptable”.

Terence McKiernan, co-director of BishopAccountability.org, called the move a “pre-emptive strike” by the Vatican against US bishops as they seek to respond to the current crisis of sexual abuse and its cover-up “in a modest way”.

Peter Isley, a survivor of clerical sexual abuse who now works with the organisation Ending Clergy Abuse, said the decision from the Vatican effectively means: “We care more about our organisation and our princely titles and positions” than enacting measures of accountability.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) is gathered in Baltimore this week for its General Assembly, in which they were expected to enact new standards of conduct and accountability for bishops engaged in sexual abuse or its cover-up. At the start of Monday’s meeting, however, USCCB president Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, announced that he had received a request on Sunday afternoon to postpone the vote until after a global summit on the crisis at the Vatican in February.

Belleville bishop challenged on abuse

BELLEVILLE (IL)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

“Sexually violent predator” worked in diocese

Few knew of his time in southern IL until recently

Two more accused abusers missing from church site

Catholic officials should hire outside firm to look through its files

This recommendation just made by church’s top abuse lay leader

WHAT

Holding signs and childhood photos at a sidewalk news conference, clergy sex abuse victims and their supporters will disclose, for the first time, that a convicted child molesting cleric who was deemed “sexually violent” worked in Belleville.

They will also call on local Catholic officials to

--update the diocesan website and add names of all three publicly accused clerics who are missing, and

-- use lay church members and an outside firm to review all abuse records to see if there are old cases that should be revisited and/or other proven, admitted or credibly accused child molesting clerics who are being hidden.

WHEN

Thursday, Nov. 15 at 2:00 p.m.

US DOJ and State AG’s must intensify their investigations of bishops

WASHINGTON (DC)
End Clergy Abuse

November 14, 2018

The US bishops came to Baltimore this week assuring Catholics and the public that they would act with “intense urgency” to implement comprehensive and tough reforms to hold themselves accountable for the decades long cover up of child sex crimes across the United States.

Not only are they leaving Baltimore without implementing one concrete change, this afternoon they even voted down a feeble amendment to send to Pope Francis a short message “suggesting” that he should release the documents concerning Archbishop Theodore McCarrick.

McCarrick, once a Cardinal, had abused seminarians for decades and at least two minors. His conduct was known about by several of his brother bishops and senior Vatican officials. It is the most egregious case of cover up yet revealed in the American church. The bishop’s response to the McCarrick case, the Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report, and other revelations that have been cascading down upon them already demonstrated their utter lack of credibility.

Now, they leave Baltimore telling us they cannot act on what they promised. That they have no actual authority over themselves or the actions they take in the United States.

Vatican, US bishops face class-action lawsuit from victims of clergy sex abuse

WASHINGTON (DC)
Catholic News Agency/EWTN News

November 15, 2018

The U.S. bishops' conference and the Holy See face a class action lawsuit filed by six men who claim they were sexually abused by Catholic clergy during their childhoods. They are seeking financial damages as well as public contrition and reparation from the Church.

The 80-page suit filed Nov. 13 claims that the Vatican and the bishops knew about - and covered up for - the “endemic, systemic, rampant, and pervasive rape and sexual abuse” of the plaintiffs and others at the hands of active members of the clergy, religious orders, and other Church representatives.

The suit opens by invoking two passages of Scripture: “(B)ut people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil. Everyone who does evil hates the light and will not come into the light for fear that their deeds will be exposed,” and: “Have nothing to do with the fruitless deeds of darkness, but rather, expose them.”

Rather than protect the plaintiffs, the lawsuit says Church leaders protected and - “incredibly” - promoted the offenders.

These kinds of “wrongful actions, inaction, omissions, cover-up, deception, and concealment” create a “conspiracy of silence to their financial and reputational benefit and to Plaintiffs’ and Class Members’ personal, mental, psychological, and financial detriment.” These actions are “ongoing and continuous” the lawsuit states.

The lawsuit was filed Tuesday at U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C. by four attorneys representing six individuals who lived in six different states at the time the abuse occurred - Iowa, California, Mississippi, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Illinois. It does not specifically detail the cases of abuse reportedly suffered by the individuals.

Vatican shows for the umpteenth time it doesn’t take the clergy sex abuse scandal seriously

WASHINGTON (DC)
Washington Examiner

November 15, 2018

By Becket Adams

Pope Francis takes the cancer of clergy sexual abuse seriously, but not seriously enough to allow the U.S. bishops to move quickly to enact serious and much-needed reforms.

The American bishops appeared stunned this week after it was announced in Baltimore at the start of their annual meeting that the Vatican’s Congregation for Bishops had ordered them to cancel a planned vote on measures to address the clerical sexual abuse scandal that has rocked the Roman Catholic Church.

The Vatican has instructed the U.S. bishops instead to hold off until the Church’s sexual abuse summit in Rome, which doesn’t convene until February 2019. Because what’s the rush?

“We have accepted it with disappointment,” said Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Houston, who heads the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. “We are not ourselves happy about this. We are working very well to move to action, and we’ll do it. We just have a bump in the road.”

"I remain hopeful that this additional consultation will ultimately improve our response to the crisis we face,” he added, trying his best to put some sort of positive spin on the decision.

New Lawsuits Accuse 11 Of Clergy Sex Abuse

PITTSBURGH (PA)
KDKA-TV

November 15, 2018

A law firm announced the suits were filed in 12 complaints that named the Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh, Bishop David Zubik and Cardinal Donald Wuerl as defendants.

The complaints name eight priests who were already named in the grand jury report along with three new individuals named by victims who have since come forward for the first time.

The priests accused in the new lawsuits include:
John Hoehl, at Quigley High School
Francis Siler, accused by two alleged victims at St. Catherine Parish and St. Margaret parish
William O’Malley, accused by two alleged victims at St. Canice Parish and St. Francis de Sales parish
George Zirwas, at St. Michael Parish
George Leech, at St. Bartholomew Parish
Edward Huff, at the parish of North American Martyrs
Raymond R. Rhoden, at St. Francis of Assisi parish
Ernest Paone, at Madonna of Jerusalem parish
John Unger, at Sacred Heart Elementary School
Peter Pilarski, at Resurrection parish
Lawrence O’Connell, accused by two alleged victims at St. Gabriel parish
Leech, Pilarski and Unger’s names were not disclosed in the grand jury report.

Delay in addressing sexual abuse is another black eye for Catholic church

ALLENTOWN (PA)
Morning Call

November 15, 2018

By Paul Muschick

I may be inviting a plague of locusts on my house by saying this. But the Vatican needs to get its act together on how the Catholic church will respond to the sex abuse crisis, or get out of the way of lower church leaders who are trying to do something.

The church had a chance this week to show a new commitment to dealing with clergy sexual abuse of children. But it blew it. Again.

There’s no doubt this time who was to blame — this blunder is on the Vatican.

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops met in Baltimore from Monday through Wednesday. Their agenda included highly anticipated votes, in the works since September, to address the problem by improving accountability for themselves.

Proposals included creating a commission, to include lay experts, that would review complaints against bishops; enacting a new code of conduct for bishops; and finalizing how to permanently remove bishops who are found to be abusers.

Vatican asks US bishops not to vote on their proposals to tackle sexual abuse
Monday morning, those votes suddenly were called off.

The president of the conference, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Houston, told the gathered bishops that the pope did not want them to act on bishops’ accountability until he convened a worldwide summit of church leaders in Februa

A new call for cooperative reform in the Catholic Church

MILFORD (MA)
Milford Daily News

November 14, 2018

By Frank Mazzaglia

Some 4,000 Roman Catholics from across the United States gathered in Boston vowing to transform a church they claimed betrayed them by failing to protect children from sexual abuse. The date was July 20, 2002. It was the first national convention of The Voice of the Faithful, a lay reform group which originated from a church basement in Wellesley only five months earlier.

In theory, Voice of the Faithful presented three goals: 1. To support victims of abuse; 2. To support “priests of integrity”; and 3. To support structural change in the church. The core of the problem, according to noted cardiologist Dr. James E. Muller was “centralized power, with no voice of the faithful.” The idea was to bring together reform-minded and traditional Catholics and demand that laypeople have a voice on key issues.

Seminaries partner with prisons to offer inmates new life as ministers

NASHVILLE (NC)
Religion News Service

November 14, 2018

By Yonat Shimron

Inside a squat cinderblock building on the grounds of Nash Correctional Institution, 24 inmates are hunched over white plastic tables listening to Professor James Dew explain how God is omnipotent and omniscient.

More than half of the men listening are serving life sentences for murder, armed robbery and other offenses. The rest have at least 12 years left to serve.

But Dew is not preaching to his audience as he paces the room posing questions about whether God can sin (No) or know people’s emotions (there’s disagreement, but most Christians say yes). He is teaching theology to prospective ministers.

The prisoners jotting notes, calling up documents on closed-circuit laptops or asking Dew questions of their own are earning four-year bachelor’s degrees in pastoral ministry from the College at Southeastern, the undergraduate school of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in nearby Wake Forest.

Dew’s class is part of a new niche in prison education: training inmates to become “field ministers” who serve as counselors for other inmates, lead prayers, assist prison chaplains and generally serve as a calming influence in prison yards.

The Catholic church is in crisis, and its leaders are making it worse

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Baltimore Sun

November 15, 2018

Baltimore Sun Editorial Board

If any truth emerged from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops meeting this week in Baltimore, it was surely Archbishop William E. Lori’s observation that the priest sex abuse scandal “ is going to be with us for a long, long time.” The church covered up the widespread abuse of children and adults by priests for a long, long time. It denied and deflected public outrage for a long, long time. And now, when a Pennsylvania grand jury report revealed the breadth of the abuse, and the fall of former Washington Archbishop Theodore McCarrick demonstrated that it extended to the top rungs of the Catholic hierarchy, the church is waiting longer to take even the most obvious of steps to restore its parishioners’ faith.

The crisis now facing the Catholic church is born not just of the abuse by priests but also of the willingness of the church’s leaders to step in to protect the clergy at the expense of the abused. Pope Francis’ call at the beginning of this meeting for the American bishops to delay any action until after a Vatican synod on the matter this winter thus looks not like a sign that the church is finally ready to address the matter at the highest level but that its old habits of deferring to clerical rather than civil or moral authority and papering over abuse remain intact. The church once moved abusive priests from parish to parish, now it is shuffling the fallout from meeting to meeting.

The bishops go back to their dioceses for a reckoning. They have faced pointed questions if not outright defections from the pews since the Pennsylvania and McCarrick scandals broke, and now they must own up to their impotence in addressing them. Before the meeting began, Archbishop Lori published an op-ed in The Sun in which he concluded that one of the factors that worsened the crisis was a “deep-seated culture of clericalism, which fostered unhealthy notions of entitlement and exclusivity, as well as the distorted view that the priestly state puts those who abused minors, as well as those who protected them, beyond reach of civil law and authority.” Yet when the opportunity came to demonstrate a break from that past, the bishops again folded in the face of clerical authority. They could not even muster a vote to encourage the Vatican to release documents related to the investigation of Mr. McCarrick.

Healey Mum On Laity Call For Renewed Church Investigation

BOSTON (MA)
WGBH TV

November 14, 2018

By Mike Deehan

Attorney General Maura Healey has failed to respond — at least to date — to a call from Catholic advocacy groups that her office investigate the personnel records of all Massachusetts archdioceses in order to ensure that there is no evidence of accused abusive priests being shuttled between or among parishes.

It should be noted that there have not been renewed allegations of priestly abuse in Massachusetts. The Roman Catholic Church, however, is embroiled in a heated, almost global debate about how to respond to such charges which have become almost commonplace.

The political group Catholic Democrats and church accountability organization Voice of the Faithful want an investigation of the Worcester, Springfield and Fall River Dioceses, as well as an update to a 2003 investigation of the Boston Archdiocese.

Leaders of the lay groups say knowing which priests were paid for work in what parishes, and if any additional payments or pensions were given out, can shed light on whether accused priests were relocated after accusations of abuse.

Survivors: Bishops Must Deliver on Final Day of Conference

BALTIMORE (MD)
End Clergy Abuse

November 14, 2018

President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, began the week by announcing that per the Vatican, no vote would be taken on measures to reform the process of the investigation of allegations of sexual misconduct against bishops or the bishops’ negligence in responding to allegations.

The bishops are expected today to present concrete working proposals that describe how they intend to repair their irrevocably damaged credibility, now considerably worsened by their inaction so far this week.

Furious dad hacks off priest’s penis after he was accused of sexually abusing his nine-year-old daughter

LONDON (UK)
The Sun

November 15, 2018

By Gerard du Cann

A FURIOUS father partially castrated a preacher he believed raped his nine-year-old daughter in South Africa, it is alleged.

Preacher Mase Malgas, 66, died after being attacked on September 30, a court was told.

Constable Lundi Nqwelo was called as a witness by the state prosecutors and testified that the defendant had been told by his ex-wife that their daughter had been raped by Malgas, The South African reported.

The father, ex-wife and a friend of the couple tracked down Malgas, who was based at St Philips Church in Gompo, and burst into his home intent on revenge, the court heard.

Nqwelo said the accused, who cannot be named as it would also reveal his daughter's identity, then severely beat Malgas and attempted to sever the preacher’s penis.

Fort Worth priest removed after being accused of groping man at park near his church

FORT WORTH (TX)
Ft. Worth Star Telegram

November 15, 2018

By Domingo Ramirez Jr.

A priest at All Saints Catholic Church has been removed after he was accused of grabbing a man’s genitals at a park in September, church officials and police said Thursday.

Father Genaro Mayorga Reyes told officers he did not touch the 43-year-old man at Marine Park on the morning of Sept. 25, according to police reports.

Bishop Michael F. Olson requested that Reyes be recalled to Mexico after learning of the incident, according to a statement released by the Catholic Diocese of Fort Worth last week to members of All Saints. It was effective Nov. 5.

“Please pray for Father Genaro and please pray for members of the All Saints parish,” the statement said.

Michigan Catholic Diocese publishes list of priests accused of sexual abuse

MICHIGAN
Michigan.Live.com

November 15, 2018

By Justin P. Hicks

The Catholic Diocese of Gaylord has created an online list of priests and deacons who have been "credibly accused" of sexual abuse of a minor dating back to 1971.

As of Thursday, Nov. 15, the list featured 10 clergy. Eight of the priests are deceased. The two living priests -- Ronald Gronowski and James Holtz -- have been "permanently removed from public ministry."

The release of the list comes amid a state investigation of sexual abuse by priests being led by the Michigan attorney general's office. In August 2018, the state agency began investigating the handling of allegations dating back to 1950.

The diocese said it has previously released information about the allegations of sexual abuse of minors involving priests or deacons, but chose to publish and maintain the list because it "may be helpful to the healing process for victim-survivors," and to continue efforts for increased transparency.

A "credible and substantiated allegation," as used by the diocese, is an accusation that, after an investigation and review of available information, appears more likely true than not and has been accepted as credible by the bishop, according to the diocese.

The Sex-Abuse Crisis and Culture Change in the Church

National Catholic Register
November 12, 2018

By Father Raymond J. de Souza

The U.S. bishops began their annual plenary meeting in Baltimore with a day devoted to prayer and reflection, a departure from the customary practice prompted by the 2018 “summer of shame.”

But why should beginning the annual meeting with a period of prayer and recollection be a departure from the norm? Might the “Crisis of 2018” prompt a revisiting of clerical culture, at least as it touches upon how bishops exercise their governance in common?

Archbishop Bernard Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis, the preacher for the bishops’ Mass Nov. 12, will have material ready at hand, given the readings. St. Paul writes to Titus about the qualities required of a bishop, with a specified list of virtues:

For a bishop, as God’s steward, must be blameless, not arrogant, not irritable, not a drunkard, not aggressive, not greedy for sordid gain, but hospitable, a lover of goodness, temperate, just, holy and self-controlled, holding fast to the true message as taught so that he will be able both to exhort with sound doctrine and to refute opponents (Titus 1:7-9).

Convicted in child porn case, rogue priest still preaches as he crafts his own narrative

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

November 15, 2018

By Brandie Kessler and Dylan Segelbaum

The Catholic church kicked him out. He is among 301 'predator priests' named by a grand jury. But he still leads a Catholic church in York County.

Harry Spencer realized that he was home.

He’d grown uncomfortable with the direction of the Catholic Church, particularly since Vatican II. The doctrines had changed. The Mass had changed. So had all the traditions and rituals.

Then, about seven years ago, Spencer started going to what would become St. Michael the Archangel Roman Catholic Church in Lower Windsor Township. It offers a traditional Latin Mass. The Rev. Virgil Tetherow, also known as Father Gabriel, leads the church.

“I have never met a priest that I’ve felt more comfortable with in his religiosity and his ability to teach the religion of the Roman Catholic faith,” Spencer said. “I love my religion. And Father Tetherow is a true Catholic priest.”

But that is not what the Catholic church says.

In fact, Tetherow “is not recognized as a priest, is prohibited from presenting himself as clergy and is not associated with the Diocese of Harrisburg,” said Mike Barley, a spokesman for the diocese, who encouraged the faithful to not attend Tetherow's services.

Clergy sex abuse: Why a national all-faiths inquiry is needed

WASHINGTON (DC)
Religion News Service

November 15, 2018

By Christa Brown and David Clohessy

Ten years ago, SNAP was the butt of the most outrageous criticism in its three decades of work on behalf of clergy sex abuse survivors.

SNAP, the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, was founded with a focus on Catholic clergy abuse. But as we expanded our efforts to other faiths, the worst name-calling came not from any Catholic official but from a Baptist official. Paige Patterson, a former Southern Baptist Convention president who, at the time, was head of a prominent Baptist seminary, labeled SNAP as “evil-doers” and said we were “just as reprehensible as sex criminals.”

It may seem odd to note the anniversary of such an odious aspersion, but at a time when survivor advocates have much to cheer about, it’s important that we not lose sight of how much work remains to be done in changing institutions and attitudes to make kids safer.

Too many survivors still face hostility when they attempt to confront religious leaders about clergy child molesters. The U.S. Justice Department has now launched an investigation into the sexual abuse of children and the cover-up of those crimes in the Catholic dioceses of Pennsylvania. And because the Justice Department put every diocese in the country on notice that they should preserve all documents relating to sexual abuse allegations, there appears the possibility of a broader investigation into Catholic abuses and cover-ups.

Amateur hour at the bishops' conference

BALTIMORE (MD)
National Catholic Reporter

November 15, 2018

By Michael Sean Winters

I am always glad to attend the bishops' conference meeting in Baltimore every November. I get to witness up close the debates that determine the shape and direction of the church in this country, I can visit with friends and colleagues in the religious press, and the crab cakes are always delicious. This year, the crab was still delicious, and it was good to see friends and colleagues, but what I witnessed was amateur hour at the U.S. bishops' conference.

On Nov. 12, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, the president of the conference, expressed his disappointment when he announced the Vatican's decision to delay any votes on concrete proposals to confront the clergy sex abuse crisis. At the coffee break, bishops were fuming, complaining that Rome had pulled the rug out from under them. Even those bishops who are most enthusiastic about Pope Francis were distressed, worried that he did not understand the media spotlight under which the bishops were laboring.

But, when the bishops began discussing the proposals on Nov. 13, it quickly became obvious that the proposals were ill-conceived and would have fallen apart on their own, without any help from Rome. Erecting a national oversight commission, at considerable expense and with additional bureaucracy, to monitor 200 bishops, very few of them likely to have broken their vows of celibacy, didn't seem very practical once they began discussing it. The proposed commission would report allegations to the nuncio but that happens now and no one had bothered to ask the nuncio if he wanted a commission to help him in his work. The Standards of Conduct seemed poorly framed and vague. The whole thing seemed amateurish.

Editorial: Vatican postponing reform measures is disappointing

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

November 14, 2018

By News Editorial Board

Victims of the child sex abuse scandals in the Catholic Church were hoping for some action on reforms this week when the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops met in Baltimore.

They got thoughts and prayers instead.

The Vatican directed the U.S. bishops to delay their votes on two reform measures until a special council of bishops worldwide convenes on Feb. 8. Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston opened the conference on Monday with that announcement from Rome.

“We are not ourselves happy about this,” said DiNardo, adding he found the decision “quizzical.”

“We just have a bump in the road” on the way to reform, he said.

CAL THOMAS: The shame of the Catholic church

BARTLESVILE (OK)
Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise

November 15, 2018

One doesn’t have to be Roman Catholic or even Christian to recognize the great good the Catholic Church has done. America would be worse off were it not its pro-life stance and numerous acts of charity.

But good works are sometimes diluted or even overwhelmed by evil works, and it is the evil works of pedophile priests that threaten to sully the good the church has done.

But what should trouble not only Catholics but non-Catholics too is the latest statement from the Vatican regarding the sexual abuse scandal, a scandal that has prompted many Catholics to leave the church and the faith altogether.

In a letter to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops meeting in Baltimore, the Vatican, as reported by U.S. News & World Report, requested that U.S. bishops “wait until after the Vatican-convened global meeting on sex abuse takes place in February” to take action on the sexual abuse issue plaguing the church. “The conference of bishops had expected to focus ... on measures to combat abuse, including establishing a new code of conduct.”

Is it just a question of timing, or yet another attempt to avoid dealing with the crisis?

The church has long been reluctant to go to law enforcement about cases of sexual abuse by priests, choosing instead to have its own officials handle the cases themselves, or as was most often the case, suppress them, moving suspected clergy from parish to parish, threatening the safety of children, and thereby continuing a pattern of depravity and neglect.

Cambria County man joins federal suit that says Catholic hierarchy covered up abuse

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

November 14, 2018

By Torsten Ove

A Cambria County man who says a Johnstown priest abused him when he was a child is among a group of plaintiffs who sued Catholic church leaders in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, claiming they covered up the actions of pedophile priests across the nation.

Shaun Dougherty, who lives in Westmont outside of Johnstown, is one of six men who brought the suit in federal court in the District of Columbia against the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and the Holy See in Vatican City.

The suit, which is seeking class action status on behalf of some 5,000 potential plaintiffs across the United States, alleges that church leaders protected priests who sexually abused children and moved them around from church to church.

In addition to Mr. Dougherty, the plaintiffs are from Arizona, Mississippi, Illinois, California and New Jersey and all claim to have suffered at the hands of predator priests.

Chilean cardinal confirms exit from Pope Francis’s advisory body

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

November 15, 2018

By Inés San Martín

A Chilean cardinal who has been at the center of the country’s clerical sexual abuse crisis acknowledged on Wednesday that he’s no longer a member of the council of nine cardinals, referred to as the C9, that advises the pope. In addition, a local prosecutor announced he’ll be summoning him under charges of covering up abusive priests.

Speaking with Radio Cooperativa, Cardinal Francisco Javier Errazuriz said that having reached the five-year term he had been appointed to serve the pope in the C9, he had travelled to Rome to say goodbye to the pope and to “thank him for the job he entrusted us with.”

The Vatican’s press office didn’t answer Crux’s request for confirmation.

The C9 is a task force created by Pope Francis at the beginning of his pontificate to reform the government of the Church, known as the Roman Curia. Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston is the lone American on the commission.

On the same day Errazuriz made his announcement, the prosecutors’ office in Chile announced that they will be summoning the cardinal to testify on the alleged cover up of the actions of Father Jorge Laplagne, who’s been accused of sexually abusing minors.

Bishops, anticipating action on abuse, settle for a metaphor

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter

November 14, 2018

By Brian Roewe

After months of anticipation, Catholics hoping the U.S. bishops' annual meeting would yield actionable steps on the sexual abuse crisis will have to settle, for now, for "a springboard."

The three-day public portion of the fall general assembly concluded Wednesday with no final decisions or concrete steps, in part due to a Vatican request to delay any votes on proposals until after a February meeting in Rome among Pope Francis and the heads of bishops' conferences from around the globe.

The request, delivered as the bishops began their proceedings Monday, came as a disappointment to many bishops who arrived eager to demonstrate their seriousness on the abuse issue, not to speak of the wider Catholic community and public watching to see if the church leaders would deliver on promises to address the matter with more than words.

In his concluding remarks, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, shared in the sentiment, though left room for some hope.

"Brothers, I opened the meeting expressing some disappointment. I end it with hope," he said. "My hope is first of all grounded in Christ, who desires that the church be purified and that our efforts bear fruit."

Former State Opera chief executive Timothy Sexton pleads not guilty to child sex offences

AUSTRALIA
Australian Broadcasting Corporation

November 14, 2018

By Rebecca Opie

The former chief executive and artistic director of the State Opera of South Australia will stand trial accused of multiple child sex offences.

Timothy Sexton, 58, pleaded not guilty in the Adelaide Magistrates Court to four child sex charges including maintaining an unlawful sexual relationship with a minor and indecent assault.

Prosecutors allege the offences were committed between 1988 and 1991 in South Australia.

Mr Sexton was the artistic director and chief executive of the State Opera from 2011.

Erie’s Trautman criticizes media, attorney general report

ERIE (PA)
GoErie

November 15, 2018

By Ed Palattella

Retired bishop of Erie commented at meeting of U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, in Baltimore. He also called “unjust” a proposed hotline for bishop misconduct.

The Catholic Diocese of Erie has become a case in point in the divide over how Roman Catholic bishops in the United States want to address the clergy sex-abuse crisis.

The differences within the diocese — specifically, the differences between its current bishop and retired bishop — have been on display this week in Baltimore, at the fall meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Many bishops at the conference, such as Erie Catholic Bishop Lawrence Persico, have embraced calls for change. Others, such as Persico’s predecessor as bishop, Donald W. Trautman, who retired in 2012, have criticized some of the conference’s proposals, including those designed to monitor the bishops and their handling of abuse allegations.

Trautman was outspoken in his remarks on Tuesday, the second day of the conference, which ended Wednesday.

At a session for debate, Trautman raised questions about the accuracy of “every attorney general report.” The Pennsylvania attorney general’s August grand jury report on clergy abuse statewide found that, among other things, Trautman failed “to aggressively pursue” removal of an abusive priest.

And Trautman on Tuesday questioned the accuracy of a joint investigation by the Boston Globe and Philadelphia Inquirer, published two weeks ago, that reported that “more than 130 U.S. bishops — or nearly one-third of those still living — have been accused during their careers of failing to adequately respond to sexual misconduct in their dioceses.” The report did not name Trautman, who led the 13-county Erie Catholic Diocese from 1990 to 2012.

Missbrauch im Stift Klosterneuburg: Kritik an Bericht

[Abuse in Stift Klosterneuburg: criticism of report]

GERMANY
religion.orf.at

November 2018

Der Expertenbericht zu einem Missbrauchsfall aus dem Jahr 1993 im Stift Klosterneuburg, der am Samstag vorgelegt worden war, ist von der Initiative gegen Gewalt und sexuellen Missbrauch an Kindern und Jugendlichen kritisiert worden.

In einer Aussendung vom Montag wurde etwa festgehalten, dass Sachverhalte und Zeugenaussagen nicht intensiv genug geprüft worden seien. Johannes Heibel, der Vorsitzende der Initiative mit Sitz in Deutschland, kritisierte auch, dass die Expertengruppe es nicht für notwendig erachtetet habe, „alle von der Initiative benannten Zeugen einzuladen und persönlich anzuhören“. Zudem habe die Gruppe weder über einen erfahrenen Ermittler noch über einen Kirchenrechtler verfügt. Auch die Unabhängigkeit der Expertenrunde zog Heibel in Zweifel.

Neue Missbrauchsvorwürfe gegen Ex-Bischof Janssen

[New abuse allegations against ex-Bishop Janssen]

GERMANY
NDR.de

November 13, 2018

Gegen den ehemaligen Hildesheimer Bischof Heinrich Maria Janssen (1907-1988) gibt es einen neuen Missbrauchsvorwurf. Dies teilte das Bistum Hildesheim mit. Der amtierende Hildesheimer Bischof Heiner Wilmer erklärte am Dienstag, dass sich jein heute 70-Jähriger bei ihm gemeldet habe. Der Mann habe angegeben, ab dem Jahr 1957 gleich von mehreren Kirchenmitarbeitern sexuell missbraucht worden zu sein, darunter auch dem damaligen Bischof Janssen. Es ist bereits der zweite Missbrauchsvorwurf gegen Janssen. Vor drei Jahren hatte ein früherer Messdiener von sexuellem Missbrauch durch Ex-Bischof Janssen berich

U.S. Catholic bishops to return to Baltimore after fall conference that failed to take action on abuse

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Baltimore Sun

November 15, 2018

By Jonathan M. Pitts

The nation’s conference of Catholic bishops announced Wednesday that it will return to Baltimore in June for an assembly as leaders grapple with a sex abuse crisis that has engulfed the church in the United States.

The move represents a change in plans for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which was to have held its week-long summer gathering next year in Santa Barbara, Calif.

The bishops’ fall meeting — held for years in Baltimore — traditionally centers on business and agenda-setting for the approximately 300 leaders of the nation’s nearly 200 dioceses. The June assembly, which is held in different locations each year, typically includes elements of a retreat.

Speaking between sessions Wednesday on the final day of the 2018 meeting at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront, Baltimore Archbishop William Lori said that with the clergy abuse crisis dominating church affairs, conference leaders decided to treat the June assembly as a business gathering as well, and Baltimore — site of the nation’s oldest diocese — has proved an excellent site for such meetings.

Msgr. J. Brian Bransfield, general secretary of the conference, told the bishops at the end of the day that the meeting will be June 11-19.

Neuer Vorwurf gegen Hildesheimer Altbischof

[New charge against Hildesheim's old bishop "The guy has to get out of the cathedral"]

GERMANY
Der Spiegel

November 14, 2018

By Peter Wensierski

"Der Kerl muss aus dem Dom raus"
Gegen den ehemaligen Hildesheimer Bischof Heinrich Maria Janssen sind neue Missbrauchsvorwürfe bekannt geworden. Ein früherer Ministrant sieht erschreckende Parallelen zu seinem eigenen Fall.

"Jetzt bricht alles wie ein Kartenhaus zusammen", sagt ein ehemaliger Ministrant, der sich vor drei Jahren im "SPIEGEL" zu Wort gemeldet hatte, weil er als Junge vom Hildesheimer Bischof Heinrich Maria Janssen missbraucht worden sei. Der Betroffene hatte angegeben, dass der Bischof ihn in den Fünfziger- und Sechzigerjahren regelmäßig durch Masturbation, Oral- und Analverkehr missbraucht habe.

How Long, Lord?

WASHINGTON (DC)
The Catholic Thing

November 14, 2018

By Robert Royal

I’ve been on the road and much occupied the past two days; my first glance at the news about the Vatican’s request that our American bishops not vote on steps to resolve the abuse crisis came as I was boarding a plane. It’s been almost twenty-four hours since then, as I’m writing – and trying, on the move, to catch up with this odd development. Second thoughts may follow, but for now, I find it hard to believe that it’s not just a bad dream.

The Vatican knew for months that the bishops would deal with abuse at their regular Fall gathering. The pope asked them to cancel it and hold a spiritual retreat instead until the heads of bishops’ conferences from around the world meet in February. It’s hard to say with any degree of precision what Pope Francis fears might happen at such a gathering.

We’re hearing vague claims that decisions by the American bishops might conflict with canon law. But when has this papacy ever been held up by law – or wanted bishops everywhere in the world to follow universal rules – when it really wanted to get something done?

Whatever the fear, to wait until the very day the meeting opened to request no voting take place is almost without precedent. For many Americans, sad to say, the pope has probably just confirmed what he was forced to admit in Chile: he’s part of the problem. That no one convinced him this move would be a public relations nightmare – and would cause more trouble than a frank discussion and voting (which he could always massage later anyway) – is a sign of where we are in the Church now.

Alleged abuse victims call for Nashville Diocese investigation

NASHVILLE (TN)
WZTV

November 9, 2018

By Harriet Wallace

Mike Coode is 79 years old. The trauma of what he says happened to him starting at age 12 still haunts him.

“After that I was pretty nuts. I did crazy things because I felt guilty, like I needed to be punished. It hurts so bad. As I said, I was devastated,” said Mike Coode.

Coode, who is no longer a practicing Catholic, went to Catholic school and church in Nashville and says a priest molested him for more than 10 years. He claims the Diocese protects guilty priests and continues to do so.

“All we’ve ever wanted was the truth, and they won’t give it to us,” said Coode.

What the Nashville Diocese is giving up are the names of 13 priests accused of molesting kids. Nine are dead, two are in prison and two are no longer acting priests. Diocese spokesman Rick Musacchio says the Diocese is being transparent and doing right by the victims.

November 14, 2018

Sexual abuse allegations are made against priest who retired in San Diego County

SAN DIEGO (CA)
The San Diego Union-Tribune

November 14, 2018

By Peter Rowe

The Rev. James Burson, a Catholic priest now living in San Diego County, has been accused of molesting a Buffalo, N.Y., high school student in the 1970s.

Burson recently was added to the Diocese of Buffalo’s list of priests credibly accused of sexual misconduct. The alleged molestation involved a boy at Cardinal Dougherty High School in Buffalo in 1979.

Moving from Buffalo to San Diego around 1996, Burson initially worked as a chaplain at Alvarado, Grossmont and Kaiser hospitals. He also served as a priest at San Diego’s Blessed Sacrament parish until his retirement on July 1, 2009.

Then he moved to St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Carlsbad. As recently as Nov. 4, the parish bulletin listed him “in residence.” However, a Diocese of San Diego spokesman said that poor health caused him to enter a board and care facility last year.

At Cardinal Dougherty, “there were multiple incidents of abuse,” said Mike Reck, a lawyer in the Los Angeles office of Jeff Anderson & Associates. “There are probably survivors that need to know about this.”

The Diocese of San Diego has received no complaints about Burson, a diocesan spokesperson said.

New book throws light on Viganò and McCarrick

UNITED KINGDOM
The Tablet

November 14, 2018

By Christopher Lamb

The 288-page book, published last week, and so far only available in Italian, draws on sources who worked with Viganò

“The truth emerges,” Ben Bradlee, the former editor of the Washington Post once said.

It’s a phrase that might usefully be applied to the testimony of Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, the former papal ambassador to the United States, who in August called on Pope Francis to resign for allegedly ignoring sexual misconduct allegations against ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick. In an explosive 11-page dossier of accusations, he claimed that the Pope had not only ignored formal sanctions that had been placed on McCarrick but had elevated him to a role as trusted adviser; he also made assertions about the pernicious influence of “homosexual currents” in the Vatican.

Since then, Archbishop Viganò has pulled back from his call for the Pope to resign, and has admitted there weren’t formal sanctions on Archbishop McCarrick, only private restrictions.

A new book, “Il Giorno del Giudizio” (“The Day of Judgment”), by two experienced Vatican journalists, Andrea Tornielli (whose interviews with Pope Francis were published in 2016 as “The Name of God is Mercy”) and Gianni Valente, helps to untangle Archbishop Viganò’s claims further, placing them into context and going some way to separating fact from fiction.

The 288-page book, published last week, and so far only available in Italian, draws on sources who worked with Viganò and from inside the Vatican. Although many details of the McCarrick case remain mysterious, this is a forensic and sober analysis that sheds new light on the career of the 88-year-old McCarrick, who was removed from public ministry and the College of Cardinals by Francis when a credible allegation he had abused a minor emerged. What “Il Giorno del Giudizio” tries to demonstrate is that attempts to turn the McCarrick saga into a “J'accuse” against Francis involves twisting facts to suit an agenda. Viganò, Tornielli and Valente claim, built a castle of accusations on grains of truth.

A new claim made in the book is that McCarrick’s sexual misconduct – which included inviting seminarians to share his bed at a beach house – was reported to the Vatican in 1999, a few months before Pope John Paul II appointed McCarrick Archbishop of Washington. Cardinal John O’Connor, Archbishop of New York, according to the authors’ sources, "wrote a heartfelt letter” to Rome in which he referred to “homosexual harassment” by McCarrick. “He declared that McCarrick was charismatic, very good at raising funds,” the book explains. “O'Connor remembered that he had recommended him in the past but that now, in conscience, he felt that he should not be chosen [for Washington].”

Child sexual abuse and the church: The church’s responsibility to protect children

TEXAS
Baptist Standard

November 13, 2018

By Scott Floyd

Previous articles considered the rate of childhood sexual abuse and how abuse impacts children and adults. Now, we ask what is the church’s role in ensuring protection to children and their families? To answer this question, we will consider a brief theology of care of children and then will look at how the church can provide effective protection for the safety of children.

What does Scripture say about care for children?

The Bible gives a clear pattern for how the world should work. In God’s design, children are to grow up in a safe environment where they can learn about God. Big people, like parents and adults who work with children, are to be loving and caring and to help little people grow up to be healthy, responsible adults who follow God with all their hearts.

Passages like Deuteronomy 6:4-9 and Psalm 78:5-8 tell of the importance of parents passing their faith along to their children. These children grow up and, in turn, pass their faith along to their children.

Mark 10:13-16 relates a time when Jesus was in Judea, well into his ministry. Individuals were bringing their children to Jesus. The disciples believed it was not the best use of Jesus’ ministry for him to spend time with children. They actually rebuked parents for bothering Jesus with their little ones.

New lawsuit filed against Catholic Church in N.O. details alleged sexual abuse at orphanage

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
WVUE

November 13, 2018

By Kimberly Curth

There are disturbing allegations in a new lawsuit against the Catholic Church in New Orleans. Four men have come forward claiming they endured sexual and physical abuse at the orphanage and youth home, Madonna Manor and Hope Haven, when they were boys in the late 1970s and 80s.

The men are only identified as John Roes. They’re suing the Archdiocese of New Orleans, Catholic Charities and the Salesian Society.

One alleged victim says when he was 9, he was selected to be an altar boy for Masses that were performed at the Madonna Manor Chapel. And, “during numerous different occasions at these masses, the priests took John Roe I to the chapel sacristy where he would be raped by certain visiting priests.”

He also says he was sexually assaulted on a field trip to St. Joseph’s Abbey in Covington by an unknown cleric.

In the face of sex abuse, the church should rethink the sacrament of reconciliation

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter

November 13, 2018

By Pat Perriello

The NCR editorial staff did not mince words in its open letter to U.S. Catholic bishops. Its insistence that "it is over" is compelling.

Let me just highlight a few points that the editorial makes.

First, the editorial highlights the efforts church leaders made to hide the truth of the scandal from the faithful, the public and law enforcement.

The authors then go on to describe the pharisaical nature of our hierarchy. They have been "imbibing the excesses of power, authority and privilege that have accrued over centuries."

It is also important to note just how big a deal the present crisis is. NCR says there is no precedent in U.S. church history and perhaps in global church history for what is facing the church right now. This is not about a debatable religious or dogmatic issue. It is a "rot at the heart of the culture entrusted with leadership of the Catholic community."

While the editorial acknowledges that the church has done some good things that makes it a safer place today, it notes that these changes were essentially made only because the scandal became public. Thus, "you were moved to words of contrition because you were, once again, caught."

These are strong words from the editorial staff of NCR. The staff is still looking to the hierarchy for a true personal examination, sincere desire for forgiveness, and a resolve to change. It demands ceding authority and ridding the clerical state of privilege and power.

Birmingham Catholic church sex abuse victims treated as 'scourge'

UNITED KINGDOM
BBC News

November 13, 2018

Child sexual abuse victims were treated like "third class citizens" and "a scourge" by a Roman Catholic Archdiocese, a survivor has claimed.

An inquiry is examining Birmingham Archdiocese' response to allegations made against four priests including Father John Tolkien, son of novelist JRR Tolkien, who died in 2003.

Fr Tolkien allegedly forced a boy to kneel and pray with his trousers down.

The survivor said he was told he was chosen "for a very special position".

Can you be a former Catholic? With new betrayal on child sex abuse, I'm about to find out

UNITED STATES
USA Today

November 14, 2018

By Melinda Henneberger

Catholic to her church: After a lifetime of stubborn adherence on my part and criminal behavior on yours, you have finally managed to drive me away.

For months, American Catholics had been asked to be patient just a little longer. We were promised that the church’s “summer of shame,” following only the latest revelations about the systemic cover-ups of clerical sex abuse, would finally be addressed this week in Baltimore at the biannual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

This wouldn’t be just one more round of forced apologies, either, but would involve action — and maybe even a vote on a new standard of conduct for bishops, and an outside commission to review violations of it.

Only, to the astonishment of no one past the age of reason, that’s not going to happen after all.

Instead, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the bishops conference, who has himself shielded at least one predator, opened the meeting by announcing that the Vatican had insisted on delaying any action until after a February Vatican summit on the scandal.

Former seminarian speaks out about Denver seminary abuse

DENVER (CO)
The Associated Press

November 13, 2018

A Catholic priest from Denver accused of sexually abusing an adult seminary student was temporarily placed in a parish after officials learned of the allegations over a decade ago but later removed.

The Philadelphia Inquirer first reported on the case Monday after former seminarian Stephen Szutenbach went public partly because he is upset Rev. Kent Drotar wasn't officially defrocked.

Anglican church welcomes broader abuse inquiry

AOTEAROA (NEW ZEALAND)
Maori Television

November 13, 2018

By Moana Makapelu Lee

The Anglican church is welcoming the government's announcement to include faith-based institutions in its inquiry into historical abuse of children in state care. Northland Bishop Te Kitohi Pikaahu says the inquiry must not be limited to the state sector and churches must also be held accountable.

The Anglican church says the inquiry will provide a pathway to healing for the victims of abuse.

Bishop Pikaahu says, "This is inquiry is about resolution for men and women in state and church care.”

He says many children were placed into church care from 1940-1980 and an investigation would unveil the extent of abuse.

“The government are now listening. Churches must also be held to account for any wrongdoing against those in their care.”

In a letter to Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in March, the Anglican church requested that churches be included in the inquiry but were turned down.

“I believe it’s because they were afraid of how far the extent of the issue went, but nothing will go amiss in this inquiry.”

Bishops Weigh Anti-Abuse Strategy After Delay Set by Vatican

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Associated Press

November 13, 2018

By David McFadden and David Crary

A Roman Catholic bishop at a meeting of his U.S. colleagues has suggested a nonbinding vote to convey a sense of their aspirations regarding anti-abuse efforts.

Several Roman Catholic bishops on Tuesday urged colleagues at their national meeting to take some sort of action on the clergy sex abuse crisis despite a Vatican order to delay voting on key proposals.

Bishop Thomas Paprocki of Springfield, Illinois, suggested a nonbinding vote to convey a sense of the bishops' aspirations regarding anti-abuse efforts.

"We are not branch managers of the Vatican," he said. "Our people are crying out for some action."

Bishop George Murry of Youngstown, Ohio, echoed Paprocki's call, saying parishioners and priests in his diocese are "very, very angry."

The three-day assembly opened Monday with a surprise announcement by Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. The Vatican, he said, was ordering the bishops to delay votes on two anti-abuse proposals until after a Vatican-convened global meeting on sex abuse in February.

DiNardo indicated there were two principal reasons for the Vatican order: to ensure that steps taken by the U.S. bishops would be in harmony with steps decided at the February meeting, and to provide more time for vetting aspects of the U.S. proposals that might conflict with church law.

Diocese probes another claim of sexual abuse

YOUNGSTOWN (OH)
The Vindicator

November 12, 2018

By Justin Dennis

A month before the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown named 34 clergymen associated with the diocese who have been credibly accused of sexually abusing a minor, it received one new allegation that is now under investigation.

The diocese last week also amended that list of accused to include one more name: One of the former friar’s accusers, who traveled with him as an altar boy in the mid-1980s, said the man forced himself on him when he was a pre-teen in St. Aloysius Parish in East Liverpool.

Simultaneously, a former Youngstown diocese priest, John F. Warner of Louisville, said he has worked to clear his name after the diocese’s Oct. 30 release, which exposed another disgraced priest with the exact same name.

Intense Debate Over Handling of Abuse Scandal Ensues at USCCB Meeting

BALTIMORE (MD)
CNA/EWTN News

November 14, 2018

More than 20 bishops and cardinals offered passionate speeches during an open-floor discussion on the sex-abuse crisis at the U.S. bishops’ meeting in Baltimore on Tuesday afternoon.

More bishops wanted to speak, but due to time constraints, their comments were reserved for the next morning.

Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, and president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), opened the discussions with the announcement that he had created a “deliberately small” task force, comprised of himself and the former presidents of the USCCB.

The task force, which includes Cardinal DiNardo and Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Archbishop Joseph Kurtz and Archbishop Wilton Gregory, will work closely with the committees of the conference to examine instances of abuse and mishandling of abuse cases, and their work will culminate in a report presented at the next bishops’ meeting in June, Cardinal DiNardo said.

Afterward, Cardinal DiNardo opened the floor to any comments on the task force or the issue of the sex-abuse crisis at large.

How Dove’s Nest trains churches to keep children safe

CHICAGO (IL)
The Christian Century

November 14, 2018

Elizabeth Palmer interviews Anna Groff

“Churches are places of high trust—and high risk.”

Anna Groff is the executive director of Dove’s Nest, an organization that equips faith communities to build safe environments for children and survivors. It trains teachers in the Circle of Grace curriculum, a tool for helping young people maintain physical boundaries and recognize inappropriate situations.

For those who don’t know the Circle of Grace curriculum, what’s the one point it makes that is most important to teach children?

Many children already receive sexuality and boundary education in school. Circle of Grace is distinct in communicating that people in the church care about all the parts of life, including our physical bodies and body safety. We want children to know that God cares and the church cares that they are safe and that their bodies are respected. Circle of Grace enables Christian educators to teach that no topic is off limits in church.

For example, a few days before Circle of Grace was being taught at a church in Grand Rapids, a first-grade student at a local Christian school texted a photo of his penis to another student. Since several of the church’s children attended that school, the text message came up in conversation during a Circle of Grace lesson. The teacher alerted the director of children’s ministries, who brought the parents into the discussion at dismissal time. “We can have those kind of conversations—about sexting, safety, our bodies—at church,” the director told me. “It is fair game.”

Claims process opens for victims of clergy sex abuse

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
The Associated Press

November 14, 2018

Victims of child sexual abuse by clergy in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia can begin filing claims as part of a victim compensation fund.

Claims administrators said Tuesday they sent 342 packets to survivors who had previously reported credible allegations.

They say the archdiocese has committed to pay accepted claims, there is no appeal process and there is no cap on the fund or the amount individual victims can receive. Victims have to waive their rights to sue the archdiocese in the future to accept offers.

Cesareo fears for church future if more action not taken on abuse

BALTIMORE (MD)
Catholic News Service

November 13, 2018

The U.S. bishops gave a standing ovation Nov. 13 to Francesco Cesareo, chairman of the National Review Board, for his report on the widening abuse crisis in the church and his calls for more action from them to address the abuse.

Cesareo, board chairman since 2013, called for broadening the scope of the “Charter on the Protection of Children and Young People” to include bishops. He also urged publishing complete lists of credibly accused clergy in all dioceses; improving the audit process; and enhancing accountability for bishops regarding cases of abuse.

He urged the bishops to take action and continue to move solutions to abuse forward. “Don’t stagnate it, or slow it down,” said Cesareo during a question-and-answer period following his report. “If that does not happen, I fear for the future of our church.”

Cesareo’s report came at the beginning of the second day of the annual fall assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore. The day’s agenda included discussion of proposals for addressing the abuse crisis but items that a day earlier the Vatican asked they delay voting on.

“They lied”: Archdiocese of Denver removed priest after seminarian’s abuse allegations, but didn’t move to defrock him

DENVER (CO)
The Denver Post

November 12, 2018

By Elise Schmelzer

Former seminarian says he feels betrayed by the church, lied to by those he knows in its leadership
A Catholic priest in Denver accused of having sexually abused a young seminarian over the course of four years in the early 2000s was placed in a local church with a school after the Archdiocese of Denver learned of the allegations.

The clergyman, Kent Drotar, lost permission to work as a priest less than two months later and was removed from his post at Notre Dame Catholic Church in southwest Denver after a disciplinary team found the allegations against him credible, as first reported by The Philadelphia Inquirer on Monday and confirmed by The Denver Post.

Stephen Szutenbach, now 37, studied at St. John Vianney Theological Seminary in Denver from 2001 to 2004, and said Drotar — then the vice rector at the seminary — repeatedly made unwanted sexual contact with him. The abuse began in the summer of 2000 when Szutenbach was 18 and worked as a groundskeeper at the seminary after graduating from Conifer High School, Szutenbach told the Post in an interview Monday.

Jehovah's Witnesses Recount Stories of Abuse, Estrangement in Leah Remini-Hosted Special

UNITED STATES
Hollywood Reporter

November 13, 2018

By Katie Kilkenny

In a special preceding 'Scientology and the Aftermath's' third season, Remini gathered ex-members to discuss their experiences with the church on issues including blood transfusions, justice and women's rights.

Leah Remini kicked off the third season of her A&E series Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath on Tuesday night with a deep-dive, two-hour special on the Christian denomination Jehovah's Witnesses.

On Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath: The Jehovah's Witnesses, Remini led a panel of ex-Jehovah's Witnesses as they explained some of the church's most controversial positions and practices: its belief in Armageddon, disavowal of blood transfusions, disfellowships and subjugation of women.

As Remini explained at the beginning, the special stemmed from letters and social-media messages the production received, asking it to look into the denomination. "I thought Jehovah's Witnesses were just nice people knocking on doors," Remini said. But "We have received many letters, [saying], 'Please look into the Jehovah's Witnesses'" and making the connection between Scientology and Jehovah's Witnesses, she noted.

Archbishop Etienne: Bishops need to address 'blind spot' of sex abuse

BALTIMORE (MD)
National Catholic Reporter

November 14, 2018

By Heidi Schlumpf

Some bishops have been more concerned about the reputation of the church than about victims of sexual abuse, indicating "clear corruption" and "a blind spot" that must be addressed, said Archbishop Paul Etienne of Anchorage, Alaska.

Etienne suggested a study — similar to the 2011 John Jay College "causes and context" study of priests who abused minors — to help understand "the episcopal attitude that was able to handle the abuse situation in such an inept way over the decades."

He also criticized bishops "who have gotten too accustomed to listening to lawyers over victims" and said that he and his brother bishops must remain vigilant against "the three Ps" — pride and the desire for privilege and power.

"That's a corruption of our life as shepherds that has to be called out and say 'No more. It's not tolerable,' " Etienne told NCR in an interview after the Nov. 13 morning session of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops meeting in Baltimore.

Later that day, Bishop Shawn McKnight of Jefferson City, Missouri, took to the floor and suggested a similar study of "the root causes of abuse of power" in the crisis.

Italian priest and pioneer in anti-pedophilia fight optimistic about Italian Church

ROME
Crux

November 14, 2018

By Claire Giangravè

An Italian priest on the front lines of the fight against sexual abuse, and a member of a commission that shortly will be producing the Italian bishops’ new guidelines for safeguarding children, said he’s optimistic about the handling of abuse cases on the peninsula.

The guidelines “will address formation, information and prevention, as well as everything necessary to ensure that the Church becomes a safe haven of care capable of handling these issues,” said Father Fortunato Di Noto, an internationally renowned figure respected for his work in the fight against pedophilia, in a phone interview with Crux.

The Italian bishops’ conference gathered Nov. 12-14 for an extraordinary assembly that is tackling, among other things, sexual abuse. Pope Francis requested that the bishops provide new guidelines, to be added to those already published in 2014, and to focus primarily on prevention.

After a year and a half of work, the commission will present the new guidelines to the assembly and the bishops will take them back to their dioceses for reflection until they are called to express their vote.

The date in which the guidelines will be voted upon and released has not been set.

Archbishop Lori Would ‘Support Vote’ To Deal With Church’s Sex Abuse Crisis, Despite Pope’s Request

BALTIMORE (MD)
WJZ

November 13, 2018

By Kimberly Eiten

Welcomed to Baltimore by protestors Tuesday on the waterfront, 300 of the nation’s bishops met inside the Marriott Hotel for the second day under the spotlight of the church’s sex abuse scandal.

Monday, the Pope asked that the bishops delay a formal vote on measures aimed at dealing with the church’s sex abuse crisis.

But Catholic leaders said even without a vote, the issue is still at the forefront this week.

A more full accounting of abuse in Catholic Church

LAS CRUCES (NM)
Las Cruces Sun-News

November 13, 2018

Sun-News Editorial Board

After years of rumors and allegations, we finally learned the full scope of sexual abuse that has taken place in the Catholic Diocese of Las Cruces in the past 35 years.

Or, as close to the full scope as we can get at this point.

Last week the diocese released the names of 28 members of the clergy who served in the diocese and were “credibly accused” of sexual misconduct with a minor. It is still possible the list of alleged abusers could grow as more people who were victimized long ago find the ability to step forward.

The exact number of victims will never be known. The diocese has put out a public request for anyone with knowledge of sexual abuse of a minor committed by a member of the clergy to contact the local police or sheriff’s department.

Church officials said they hope that releasing the list of alleged abusers will lead more victims to come forward. And, they have also established a victim’s assistance coordinator, Margarita Martinez, who can be contacted at 575-523-7577.

Many of the 28 alleged abusers are now dead. We are told by the diocese than none are still active in the ministry.

Survivors accuse Catholic church and police of 'covering up' decades of child sexual abuse

UNITED KINGDOM
ITV News

November 13, 2018

By Charlotte Cross

Harrowing details of violent and sexual abuse at the hands of Roman Catholic priests in the Midlands have been revealed today.

An inquiry panel has heard how for years, claims by victims and survivors were ignored, minimised and brushed under the carpet by senior figures in the Archdiocese of Birmingham - with suggestions the police may have been aware of what was going on.

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse is spending this week looking into the way the Archdiocese - the biggest such province in England and Wales - handled reports of abuse.

On the second day of hearings, the panel heard from a survivor known as A31, who was targeted by former priest James Robinson; as well as a man who says he was abused by Father John Tolkien, the son of Lord of the Rings author JRR Tolkien.

Alleged victim of Archbishop McCarrick speaks at rally outside USCCB meeting

BALTIMORE (MD)
CNA Daily News

November 13, 2018

James Grein, the man who came forward this summer alleging he was abused for 18 years by Archbishop Theodore McCarrick, appeared in public Tuesday for the first time and revealed his full name. Previously, the New York Times had identified him only as “James.”

Grein appeared at the Nov. 13 “Silence Stops Now” counter-rally organized by several groups critical of the bishops’ approach to addressing the sexual abuse crisis. The rally was held near the location of the USCCB’s Fall General Assembly in Baltimore.

Grein was visibly nervous taking the stage, where he delivered a short speech about his experience coming forward with his story, and received an extended standing ovation when he finished.

In July Grein came forward with his story to the New York Times. He said McCarrick began abusing him when he was 11 years old. At that time, McCarrick was 39 years old, and a priest of the Archdiocese of New York.

This abuse continued for the next 18 years, he said, during which McCarrick was consecrated a bishop and served in the local Churches of New York, Metuchen, and Newark. In November 2000, he was appointed Archbishop of Washington, where he served the remainder of his career until his 2006 retirement. In 2001, McCarrick was elevated to the College of Cardinals. About a week after Grein’s allegation was published, McCarrick resigned from the College of Cardinals.

Pope Francis Just Pulled a Power Play on American Bishops at Crucial Conference

ROME
The Daily Beast

November 12, 2018

By Barbie Latza Nadeau

At a moment when optics matter most, Francis pulled the plug on U.S. bishops as they met to do something measurable on clerical sex abuse—and precisely as new allegations emerged.

There has perhaps never been a more critical moment in the history of the American Catholic Church to appear to be doing the right thing on clerical child sex abuse than this week as their leadership meets in Baltimore.

But in the hours before the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, or USCCB, representing some 196 dioceses, gathered Monday morning, word came down from Rome that Pope Francis didn’t want the Americans to vote on two important items on their agenda—essentially ordering them to halt their vital work on reforms.

Instead, he wants any vote by individual national churches to take place after a Feb. 21-24, 2019, summit in Rome, where the global leaders of the church will be focused on its worldwide response to abuse.

But it means that this U.S. meeting, which was supposed to herald a change of course, is now just another meeting in which nothing concrete is accomplished.

Anne Barrett Doyle, the co-director of Bishops Accountability, a website that lists all cases of misconduct and coverups by clergy, called the Vatican’s move “truly incredible.”

Vatican orders US bishops to postpone crucial vote on sexual abuse crisis

VATICAN CITY
The Independent

November 12, 2018

By Sarah Harvard

The Vatican has instructed US Catholic bishops to postpone plans to vote on proposed new steps to address the clergy sex abuse crisis embroiling the church.

The US Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) was planning to vote on a referendum that would hold bishops responsible for failing to protect children from sexual abuse in the church.

In an announcement to his fellow Catholic clergymen, USCCB President Cardinal Daniel DiNardo said the Holy See requested the conference to hold off their vote until February when the Vatican will hold their global meeting on sexual abuse.

“We are not, ourselves, happy about this,” Mr DiNardo said – with much chagrin – at a press conference in Baltimore on Monday morning. “We have been working hard to get to the action stage, and we’ll do it, but we have to get past this bump in the road.”

Mr DiNardo said he was made aware of the decision on Sunday.

American Catholic Bishops Miss Their Big Chance to Implement Sex-Abuse Reforms

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Atlantic

November 14, 2018

By Olivia Paschal

In an unprecedented move, the Vatican intervened this week to scuttle a vote on proposed changes to bishop oversight.

This week’s fall assembly of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops was supposed to be the first high-profile occasion for the Church’s top leaders to take steps toward rebuilding public trust after a series of revelations this summer in the ongoing sex-abuse crisis. The assembly was slated to vote this week on a series of reforms to address the crisis, but its plans were quickly upended by the Vatican, throwing the reforms’ future into doubt.

Had they passed, the proposed measures would have created a code of conduct for bishops and a special commission, including six lay members, tasked with working with the apostolic nuncio, the Pope’s diplomatic representative to the United States Church, to investigate allegations of bishop misconduct. These would have been small, but significant, moves toward making bishops more accountable when they fail to report abusive priests, or when they are accused of abuse themselves. But even these limited actions were delayed.

On Monday morning, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, the conference’s president, announced that the Vatican’s Congregation for Bishops had asked the bishops to delay a vote on the reforms. They would wait until a February meeting between Pope Francis and the heads of bishops’ conferences around the world. The Holy See’s request came as an unwelcome shock to many of the bishops, and may further strain the already tense relationship between American bishops and the papacy.

Yahoo News Explains: Is the Vatican doing enough to address sexual abuse in the church?

VATICAN CITY
Yahoo News Video

November 14, 2018

By Kayla Jardine

The Vatican halted a plan by U.S. bishops to address the age-old sexual abuse issues plaguing the Roman Catholic Church.

“At the insistence of the Holy See, we will not be voting on the two action items in our documentation regarding the abuse crisis,” said Cardinal Daniel DiNardo.

America’s Catholic leaders hoped to vote on the first code of conduct for bishops. This would make it easier to investigate misconduct and abuse in the Catholic Church.

The announcement was made at an annual meeting, and many were left disappointed and frustrated by the news from Rome.

“We can bring a lot in terms of what we’ve managed to accomplish over 16 years, in terms of cleaning up our act, making sure our churches are safe for children, our schools are safe for children,” said Bishop Christopher Coyne.

Leaders planned to hold bishops more responsible for reported cases of misconduct and abuse.

J.R.R. Tolkien’s priest son a focus of UK abuse inquiry in Birmingham archdiocese

LEICESTER (UNITED KINGDOM)
Crux

November 13, 2018

By Charles Collins

Allegations of abuse lodged against Father John Tolkien, son of Lord of the Rings creator J.R.R. Tolkien, were discussed on Monday and Tuesday by a British government inquiry into abuse into the Archdiocese of Birmingham.

The priest, who died in 2003, was accused of making a group of boys strip naked during a camping trip in the 1950s, as well as abusing a child seeking help with his reading skills.

The Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse is this week examining the Archdiocese of Birmingham’s response to historic allegations made against several priests, including Tolkien.

The inquiry was established by the British Home Office - which oversees similar areas as the U.S. Departments of Justice and Homeland Security - but is independent and does not answer to the government.

READ THE COMPLAINT: Class action 
abuse lawsuit 
names bishops 
and Vatican

JOHNSTOWN (PA)
The Tribune-Democrat

November 14, 2018

By Dave Sutor

A Westmont resident is one of six named plaintiffs in a federal class action civil suit filed Tuesday against the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and the Holy See.

Shaun Dougherty, an alleged victim of childhood sexual abuse at the hands of a priest within the Roman Catholic Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown, has joined the lawsuit that is about the alleged “endemic, systemic, rampant, and pervasive rape and sexual abuse of Plaintiffs and Class Members” perpetrated by cardinals, bishops, monsignors, priests, sisters, lay leaders and members of church orders, according to the document, obtained late Tuesday by The Tribune-Democrat.

Plaintiffs also argue that the alleged abuse and coverup constitutes a Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act case, because multiple alleged violations involved the federal mail and wire fraud.

Our Opinion: Worrisome stoppage of bishops' conference

PITTSFIELD (MA)
The Berkshire Eagle

November 13, 2018

For the Roman Catholic Church in America, this week was to have been a time of self-realization, confrontation and admission of past sins, and the development of concrete action to resurrect an institution in crisis. As the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops opened its meeting in Baltimore on Monday, attendees were determined to address the 16-year-old abuse scandal that had been re-energized over the summer by a Pennsylvania grand jury's allegations that at least 1,000 children had been abused by 301 priests over the past 70 years. The underlying sentiment was that only a thorough process wherein even bishops would be held accountable for sexual misconduct and/or covering up such acts within their dioceses would return disillusioned former faithful to the church's flock.

As the bishops learned to their shock and dismay at the conclave's opening, orders had arrived from Pope Francis to stand down until a worldwide meeting of senior clergy had an opportunity to meet next February. While the American church has a tradition of following its own procedural path within certain guidelines, the assembled bishops, whether they liked it or not, acknowledged that they owed their fealty first and foremost to the Pope, regardless of how expectant and hopeful victims and laity might greet the news.

In a speech in Estonia in September, Pope Francis acknowledged that the clergy abuse scandal was eroding the faith of Catholics and chasing many from the church. The speech, in which the Pope said the church must change, coincided with a stinging report on clergy abuse of children in Germany. Unfortunately, the Pope's request of the American bishops feeds cynicism that the church does not intend to go beyond words to action.

Bishops weigh anti-abuse strategy after delay set by Vatican

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Associated Press

November 14, 2018

Several Roman Catholic bishops on Tuesday urged colleagues at their national meeting to take some sort of action on the clergy sex abuse crisis despite a Vatican order to delay voting on key proposals.

Bishop Thomas Paprocki of Springfield, Illinois, suggested a nonbinding vote to convey a sense of the bishops' aspirations regarding anti-abuse efforts.
"We are not branch managers of the Vatican," he said. "Our people are crying out for some action."

Bishop George Murry of Youngstown, Ohio, echoed Paprocki's call, saying parishioners and priests in his diocese are "very, very angry."

The three-day assembly opened Monday with a surprise announcement by Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. The Vatican, he said, was ordering the bishops to delay votes on two anti-abuse proposals until after a Vatican-convened global meeting on sex abuse in February.

DiNardo indicated there were two principal reasons for the Vatican order: to ensure that steps taken by the U.S. bishops would be in harmony with steps decided at the February meeting, and to provide more time for vetting aspects of the U.S. proposals that might conflict with church law.

Even without the option of a formal vote this week, the U.S. bishops proceeded with discussion of the two key proposals. One would establish a new code of conduct of individual bishops; the other would create a nine-member special commission, including six lay experts and three members of the clergy, to review complaints against the bishops.

Diocese of Gaylord Releases List of Priests Accused of Sexual Abuse

GAYLORD (MI)
9and10 News

November 14, 2018

By David Lyden

The investigation into clergy sex abuse in the Catholic Church is now reaching into Northern Michigan.

The Diocese of Gaylord has published the names of all priests accused of misconduct dating back to 1971.

That list includes 10 names and has been made public on the diocese’s website.

Some of the priests have passed away, but others are simply listed as removed from public ministry.

The list does not include what they were accused of or their assignment history.

We should also note the diocese did not make any formal announcement that the list had been published.

US bishops meeting to debate sex abuse crisis, accountability

UNITED STATES
La Croix International (with Catholic News Service)

November 12, 2018

They will also include some other agenda items, such as a statement on racism and election of chairmen for several committees

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) will gather for the 2018 Fall General Assembly in Baltimore today when top of the agenda will be the sex abuse crisis and accountability for bishops.

The Nov. 12-14 meeting will also include some other agenda items, such as a statement on racism and election of chairmen for several committees.

Vienna priest placed on leave amidst allegation of misconduct; faced previous allegation

VIENNA TWP. (OH)
WFMJ

November 12, 2018

By Cristen Manion and J. Breen Mitchell

A Vienna pastor placed on administrative leave pending an allegation into inappropriate behavior with a minor has faced a similar allegation in the past.

According to the Youngstown Catholic Diocese, Reverend Denis G. Bouchard, F.S.S.P., is on administrative leave following allegations of "inappropriate behavior with a minor," which came to light in September.

The victim was between the ages of 9 and 11 at the time of the alleged abuse.

Bouchard is currently the pastor of Queen of the Holy Rosary Parish, Vienna, Ohio.

21 News has learned this is not the first time there has been an allegation of misconduct against Bouchard. Casey told 21 News a previous allegation had been made against him, but the alleged victim, in that case, was not cooperative with investigators at the time, so the allegation was never deemed to be credible. Casey said she has also reached out to that alleged victim but has also encountered the same reluctance to cooperate. Bouchard was not on a list of priests deemed to have been credibly accused of sexual abuse released last month by the Diocese.

The diocese says the Diocesan Review Board met and recommended to Bishop George V. Murry, S.J., further investigation to determine its credibility and substantiation.

The Diocese of Youngstown says their policy dictates that Father Bouchard be placed on administrative leave while a thorough investigation proceeds.

The Victim Assistance Coordinator for the Diocese, retired police Sergeant Delphine Baldwin-Casey, says the allegation is within the statute of limitations and they are conferring with the Trumbull County Prosecutor's Office about potential charges, but said it will likely be up to the victim whether they want to pursue charges, since they are of legal age now.

Women and men religious in France discuss 'change' in the Church

LOURDES (FRANCE)
La Croix International

November 12, 2018

By Bruno Bouvet

Religious appear to agree on the importance of a balanced community life to prevent abuse, including the correct use of speech and authority

French religious communities, whose leaders are meeting in Lourdes until Nov.13, have not been immune from the problems and abuses highlighted by Pope Francis in his Letter to the People of God. Many now view these difficulties as an opportunity for renewal, particularly in Church governance.

What did Father Jean-Pierre Longeat, a monk from Ligugé and former president of the Conference of Men and Women Religious in France (CORREF), mean when he spoke of “beneficial situations that are forcing us to take a stand”?

What will the Vatican do with China’s underground bishops?

CHINA
La Croix International

November 12, 2018

By Michael Sainsbury

Their fate was not included in the recent deal with Beijing and remains under discussion

On the face of it, one of the more curious issues about the recent "temporary" deal between the Vatican and Beijing on the appointment of bishops, as described in the official state-run Chinese media, was the lack of any resolution of the status of bishops appointed by the Vatican but not recognized by Communist Party-run Catholic groups.

It would seem to have been a logical quid pro quo — something granted or expected in return for something given — for the Vatican's forgiveness and recognition of seven bishops (including one recently deceased bishop) appointed by the Chinese Communist Party's twinset of Catholic apparatus. These are the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association and the Bishops' Conference of the Chinese Catholic Church (BCCCC). This meant their de facto excommunications were also revoked.

Gil Tamayo asume un “silencio cómplice” de la Iglesia con la pederastia pero lo extiende a toda la sociedad

[Episcopal Conference leader Gil Tamayo admits Church's "complicit silence" but extends it to the whole society]

MADRID (SPAIN)
El País

November 14, 2018

El secretario general de la Conferencia Episcopal Española pide al resto de la sociedad que no se calle y que asuma "su cuota de responsabilidad"

El secretario general y portavoz de la Conferencia Episcopal Española, José María Gil Tamayo, ha admitido que durante años la Iglesia ha guardado un "silencio cómplice" ante los casos de pederastia en el seno de esta institución, que ha enmarcado en un contexto de "inacción de toda la sociedad española" ante estos delitos.

French religious unite to combat sexual abuse

LOURDES (FRANCE)
La Croix International

November 13, 2018

By Bruno Bouvet

Work groups and dedicated study days being organized to help inform decisions; open new avenues of investigation and action

Following directly from measures outlined by the French bishops in the conclusion of their autumn plenary assembly in Lourdes, representatives of men and women religious have confirmed their engagement in the fight against sexual abuse.

Iglesia de Santiago: en qué se usó el dinero recibido en 2017

[Church of Santiago: how money received in 2017 was used]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 13, 2018

By M. Navarrete and S. Rodríguez

Arzobispado publicó el balance de su última gestión, con ingresos por $ 11 mil millones. El trabajo pastoral y social de sus vicarías se lleva más de la mitad de los recursos.

En estos días en que se desarrolla en Santiago la Asamblea Plenaria de la Conferencia Episcopal, donde, entre otros temas, se abordarán los casos de abusos por parte del clero, la Arquidiócesis de Santiago transparentó este martes sus ingresos y gastos de 2017, año en que se anunció la visita del Papa Francisco a Chile y que antecedió a la actual crisis eclesial.

Juan Barros tras declarar por caso de encubrimiento: “Espero que todo se vaya aclarando”

[Juan Barros after testifying in cover-up case: "I hope everything will be clarified for good"]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 14, 2018

By Claudia Soto

El obispo emérito de Osorno declaró como imputado ante el fiscal Sergio Moya, en el marco de las indagatorias por los presuntos delitos sexuales cometidos por el ex capellán de la Fach Pedro Quiroz.

Hasta la fiscalía de O’Higgins llegó esta mañana el obispo emérito de Osorno, Juan Barros, para declarar en calidad de imputado por el eventual encubrimiento de los presuntos delitos sexuales cometidos por el ex capellán de la Fach, Pedro Quiroz.

Cardenal Errázuriz se despide del Papa y cierra su participación en el C9

[Cardinal Errázuriz says goodbye to the Pope and ends his C9 participation]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 14, 2018

By Sergio Rodríguez and María José Navarrete

El encuentro con el Pontífice ocurrió el fin de semana reciente. “Fui a Roma a despedirme del Santo Padre y a agradecerle el fecundo trabajo que nos confió para reformar la Curia Romana”, ratificó el prelado chileno.

“No es un renuncia. Me despedí al término del período para el cual fui nombrado”, aclaró ayer a La Tercera PM el cardenal Francisco Javier Errázuriz, en relación al viaje que efectuó el fin de semana último al Vaticano, para cerrar su trabajo en el Consejo de Cardenales, también conocido como C9.

As Others See It: Vatican officials still don’t get it

WASHINGTON (DC)
The Washington Post

November 14, 2018

AN EDITORIAL FROM THE WASHINGTON POST

The Catholic Church proves incapable of exorcising clergy sex abuse — again

It is evident that the Catholic Church is incapable on its own of exorcising the scourge of clergy sex abuse. The scandal raged unchecked for decades and, even after it was exposed in 2002 by the Boston Globe, has been met by the church hierarchy with denial, temporizing, stonewalling and half-measures.

Even as the bishops of America’s 196 Catholic dioceses and archdioceses gathered in Baltimore on Monday to grapple with the latest major revelations — a Pennsylvania grand jury’s report from August detailing decades of abuse involving more than 1,000 victims and at least 300 clergy members — they were stopped in their tracks by an abrupt message from the Vatican, which asked them to hold off. That intercession arrived along with a warning from Pope Francis’ ambassador in the United States, Archbishop Christophe Pierre, who seemed to scoff at the proposal, which the bishops had been set to vote on, to establish a lay commission that would assess bishops’ misconduct — “as if we were no longer capable of reforming or trusting ourselves,” as he put it.

That remark crystallized the arrogance that has often characterized the church’s stance even as countless exposes have laid bare the culpability of its leaders. From high and low, the church has broadcast its conviction that its own transgressions are no worse than that of other institutions; that state statutes of limitations that shield dioceses from lawsuits should be preserved; and that no foothold may be allowed for mechanisms to discipline bishops who have enabled abuse by transferring pedophile priests from parish to parish.

Seattle Archdiocese pays nearly $7 million to settle men’s claims that six priests abused them as boys

SEATTLE (WA)
The Seattle Times

November 13, 2018

By Lewis Kamb

Jim Hauer and the five other men each claim they were victimized as children decades ago by priests assigned to churches and schools throughout Western Washington. In addition to receiving settlements, several expressed a demand that the church reveal its infamous "secret files" that for years protected and enabled abusers.

He’d just finished the eighth grade and was pursuing a plan to devote his life to God when Jim Hauer met the priest who he says introduced him to evil.

Back then, in 1976, Hauer said he “didn’t understand” how Father Theodore Marmo — a supervisor of the Seattle Archdiocese’s seminary studies program at John F. Kennedy High School in Burien — allegedly groomed him for abuse.

“I was innocent of thought,” Hauer recalled this week.

But now, some four decades later, Hauer can plainly recognize the tactics his alleged rapist employed: How Marmo separated him from the other boys his age; how the priest took him skiing and to movies; how he hired Hauer for jobs that kept the boy at St. Edwards Hall, the live-in seminary, over weekends and otherwise “enabled him to take advantage of me.”

Decades later, memories of what Marmo did to him mostly remained buried deep in Hauer’s mind until two years ago. That’s when the then-53-year-old San Francisco-based technology sales executive and married father of two sons received an unexpected call. A legal investigator in Seattle was on the line, checking into another man’s abuse claims about the priest.

Lamenting Clergy Sex Abuse, Pa. Bishops Announce Victim-Compensation Funds

HARRISBURG (PA)
Catholic News Agency

November 13, 2018

Seven of the eight Roman Catholic dioceses of Pennsylvania will create compensation funds for victims of clergy sex abuse.

Seven of the eight Roman Catholic dioceses of Pennsylvania will create compensation funds for victims of clergy sex abuse, following a grand jury inquiry into abuse of minors by Catholic priests in the state.

“The damage done to innocent young people and their families by sexual abuse in the past is profound. It can’t be erased by apologies, no matter how sincere. And money can’t buy back a wounded person’s wholeness,” Archbishop Charles Chaput of Philadelphia said in a Nov. 8 column for CatholicPhilly.com.

“But what compensation can do is acknowledge the evil done and meaningfully assist survivors as they work to find greater peace in their lives,” he said.

The archdiocese-funded reparations effort will pay “the amounts that independent claims administrators deem appropriate,” he said.

4 more allege sexual abuse at Marrero youth homes in new church abuse lawsuit

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The New Orleans Advocate

November 13, 2018

By Ramon Antonio Vargas

Four more men have come forward with detailed claims of being abused both sexually and physically while living at two troubled Catholic-run youth homes in Marrero in the 1970s and ’80s, according to a new lawsuit filed Tuesday.

The 24-page suit appears to be the first aimed at the Archdiocese of New Orleans since, earlier this month, it revealed the names of 57 clergy members considered to have been credibly accused of sexually abusing children within the last 50 years.

That list included eight clergymen who worked at the two homes, Hope Haven and Madonna Manor, which have been the focus of earlier lawsuits settled by the archdiocese. The homes are largely vacant these days.

By design, the list of fallen priests and deacons released Nov. 2 did not include the names of any lay staff or religious brothers and nuns working at archdiocese facilities. Those omissions, the lawsuit claims, run counter to the archdiocese's stated aim of being completely transparent in the wake of the child sex abuse crisis that has dogged the Catholic Church for decades.

The lawsuit says that along with priests of the Salesian order, lay staffers and a religious brother were among the victims' tormentors. The victims don’t provide their names in the suit, which describes numerous acts of molestation.

Allentown Diocese, former bishop, former priest and treatment center sued

ALLENTOWN (PA)
The Morning Call

November 13, 2018

By Tim Darragh and Peter Hall

A 29-year-old man is suing Allentown Diocese Bishop Alfred Schlert, former Bishop Edward Cullen, a former diocesan priest and a treatment center for priests in a complaint alleging he was sexually molested between the ages of 10 and 12.

The lawsuit, filed Monday in Lehigh County Court, alleges that former priest Bruno Tucci groped the man, identified in the lawsuit as “John Doe,” when he was an altar boy at Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Nesquehoning between 1999-2001.

Attorneys Gerald J. Williams of Philadelphia, Michelle Simpson Tuegel of Dallas and Muhammad S. Aziz of Houston, who represent John Doe, said during a news conference in Philadelphia the suit is the first seeking monetary damages that is based on information contained in the Pennsylvania grand jury report on clergy abuse released this summer.

New lawsuit filed against Catholic Church in N.O. details alleged sexual abuse at orphanage

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
WVUE

November 13, 2018

By Kimberly Curth

There are disturbing allegations in a new lawsuit against the Catholic Church in New Orleans. Four men have come forward claiming they endured sexual and physical abuse at the orphanage and youth home, Madonna Manor and Hope Haven, when they were boys in the late 1970s and 80s.

The men are only identified as John Roes. They’re suing the Archdiocese of New Orleans, Catholic Charities and the Salesian Society.

One alleged victim says when he was 9, he was selected to be an altar boy for Masses that were performed at the Madonna Manor Chapel. And, “during numerous different occasions at these masses, the priests took John Roe I to the chapel sacristy where he would be raped by certain visiting priests.”

He also says he was sexually assaulted on a field trip to St. Joseph’s Abbey in Covington by an unknown cleric.

The lawsuit says the sexual and physical abuse continued until he was admitted to a mental institution where he stayed for more than two years because of a severe emotional collapse.

The DOJ is finally investigating Catholic Church sex crimes, and it could catalyze other lawsuits

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Jurist

November 13, 2018

By Professor SpearIt; Edited by Jessica Lasky

JURIST Guest Columnist Professor SpearIt of the Jesuit-affiliated Gonzaga University School of Law discusses critical questions and possible implications of the DOJ investigation into the Catholic Church...

The Department of Justice (DOJ) recently launched an investigation into the Catholic Church in Pennsylvania. The central focus of the inquiry seeks to determine whether there have been violations of federal child sex-crimes and related crimes among Church leaders. This investigation raises a number of critical issues, including the potential impacts on American law and society. For the Church, there are no certainties about what the investigation portends for clergy or congregation. In the best-case scenario for church leadership, the investigation could be concluded quickly and painlessly, with little or no legal consequence; more menacingly, the investigation could lead to indictments and trigger investigations far and wide.

The catalyst for the federal investigation was a report released by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in August 2018, detailing its own investigation into the Church. The twenty-three grand jurors who helped compile the report included practicing Catholics who based their reporting on internal documents surrendered by six Dioceses and on testimony from victims. The findings indicated that more than 300 priests in Pennsylvania had sexually abused children over seven decades, and the priests were protected by a hierarchy of church leadership. The findings stated:

OTHERS SAY: Catholic Church waves red flag

WASHINGTON (DC)
The Washington Post

November 14, 2018

It is evident that the Catholic Church is incapable on its own of exorcising the scourge of clergy sex abuse. The scandal raged unchecked for decades and, even after it was exposed in 2002 by the Boston Globe, has been met by the church hierarchy with denial, temporizing, stonewalling and half-measures.

Even as the bishops of America's 196 Catholic dioceses and archdioceses gathered in Baltimore Monday to grapple with the latest major revelations - a Pennsylvania grand jury's report from August detailing decades of abuse involving more than 1,000 victims and at least 300 priests - they were stopped in their tracks by an abrupt message from the Vatican, which asked them to hold off. That intercession arrived along with a warning from Pope Francis' ambassador in the United States, Archbishop Christophe Pierre, who seemed to scoff at the proposal, which the bishops had been set to vote on, to establish a lay commission that would assess bishops' misconduct - "as if we were no longer capable of reforming or trusting ourselves," as he put it.

How Chicago Catholics are responding to the church sex abuse crisis

CHICAGO (IL)
FOX 32

November 13, 2018

In a FOX 32 special report: losing the faith.

After decades of clergy abuse allegations in the catholic church, new revelations are coming to life. But what keeps parishioners coming back week after week?

For John Prezzia, the Catholic church is where he was raised. It's part of his identity and where he continues to find solace.

“There's nowhere else to go for true joy, true peace, and true love,” Prezzia said.

“I grew up on the south side of Chicago. A cradle Catholic, very religious family,” said Therese Albrecht-Key.

But while some found true joy, others found pure hell. Therese Albrecht-Key says her priest began abusing her -- in the church -- when she was only 8 years old.

“The touching started, and then it escalated to rape and sodomy over a desk in the classroom,” Albrecht-Key said.

She said it lasted for years and when she finally got the courage to speak up, she was dismissed.

“What he did to me, killed my spirit, murdered my soul. I'm hanging on, by the skin of my teeth,” Albrecht-Key said.

Claims process begins for clergy abuse victims; nearly 350 submitted credible allegations

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
KYW Newsradio

November 13, 2018

By Steve Tawa

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia's independent compensation program for victims of clergy abuse has begun to provide support for survivors.

Members on the panel for the Independent Reconciliation and Reparations Program (IRRP) will begin to hear claims, regardless of when victims were harmed.

The panel disclosed for the first time that its initial mailing of packets went to 342 known survivors within the Archdiocese of Philadelphia who submitted credible allegations. The work will be monitored by an Independent Oversight Committee, chaired by former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell.

"Sexual abuse of minors by members of the Catholic Church clergy is a tragedy," Mitchell said. "It seriously and adversely affected many innocent victims that mars the church's considerable contribution to the fabric of American life. Also of great concern, are the failures of many archdioceses to prevent these unspeakable acts from occurring."

Catholic priests at Hope Haven orphanage in Marrero accused of molestation in new lawsuit

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

November 13, 2018

By Drew Broach

Pedophile priests accused of molesting children at the former Hope Haven and Madonna Manor orphanages are targets of a new lawsuit filed Tuesday (Nov. 13) against the Archdiocese of New Orleans and the Salesian order to which the priests belonged. Two lawyers filed the suit in Orleans Parish Civil District Court on behalf of four unnamed adults who as children lived at the Marrero orphanages in the 1970s and 1980s.

The suit comes 11 days after the archdiocese disclosed the names of 55 priests and two deacons whom it said had been “credibly accused” of sexually abusing children in its jurisdiction since 1917. Eight of those priests, six of them now dead, worked at Hope Haven.

Ogdensburg diocese releases names of priests implicated in abuse

OGDENSBURG (NY)
Watertown Daily Times

November 14, 2018

By Larry Robinson

The Diocese of Ogdensburg has released a statement and a list of priests implicated in the church’s sexual abuse scandal on the diocesan website.

The posting comes following a Sunday statement from Bishop Terry R. LaValley promising to make the names public.

“Diocesan Priests removed from ministry and those who were deceased or left ministry prior to a finding of reasonable grounds by the Diocesan Review Board and/or the Diocesan Bishop due to sexual misconduct with a minor or vulnerable adult,” the statement reads.

Eight of the 28 priests on the list, John Fallon, Theodore Gillette, John Hunt, Liam O’Doherty, Robert Shurtleff, Clark White, David Wisniewski and Paul Worczak were named by a Minnesota-based law firm representing victims of child abuse in March.

“The Diocese of Ogdensburg can be viewed as a microcosm of the national problem of priests sexually assaulting minors because the diocese fails to fully disclose its knowledge of sexually abusive priests,” the law firm’s report stated.

Alleged sex abuse survivors look to sue bishops for "knowingly concealing" accused priests

BALTIMORE (MD)
WKBW

November 14, 2018

Survivors of alleged sexual abuse at the hands of priests nationwide are set to announce a federal class-action lawsuit aimed at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

In the lawsuit, the group and their attorneys say the Conference "knowingly concealed" the identities and actions of known abusers. So they're calling for the bishops to release the names and files of every known accused priest in the country.

They're due to make the announcement at 1:00 Wednesday afternoon in Baltimore, where those bishops are for the final day of their annual meeting.

This pattern of abuse is preventable

HAMDEN (CT)
The Quinnipiac Chronicle

November 13, 2018

By Garret Reich

Waterbury priest sued for sexual abuse

“If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one,” Mitchell Garabedian said in the 2015 movie “Spotlight.”

I watched this movie last week for the third time. Even then, I did not realize how relevant the issue of sexual abuse in the Catholic church still is today.

Nor did I think that it would hit so close to home.

Last Wednesday, it was revealed that a former Connecticut priest is being accused of sexual abuse toward Kevin Distasio, an altar boy at the Waterbury Blessed Sacrament Church in 1980.

The Waterbury Church is only half an hour away from Quinnipiac.

Now, 38 years later, 46-year-old Distasio is suing.

Sexual abuse victims file class action lawsuit against Vatican, Catholic bishops

WASHINGTON (DC)
The Washington Times

November 13, 2018

By Stephen Dinan

Six men filed a class action and racketeering lawsuit Tuesday against the Vatican and America’s Catholic bishops, arguing they were aware of but ignored evidence of rape and sexual abuse within the clergy.

The 80-page complaint, filed in federal district court in Washington, D.C., asks a judge to order a personal apology from the church hierarchy to abuse victims, to demand a full public accounting of all cases dating back to 1940, and to compensate victims and create a medical monitoring fund to help in recovery.

The plaintiffs all say they were abused when they were children attending churches from Mississippi to Iowa, and California to Pennsylvania.

November 13, 2018

“La Conferencia Episcopal Española debe dar justicia a las víctimas”

[Expert: "The Spanish Episcopal Conference must give justice to the victims"]

SPAIN
El País

November 13, 2018

By Daniel Verdú

Hans Zollner, miembro de la comisión para la prevención de abusos a menores del Vaticano y experto en la materia, cree que España puede hacer mucho más en esta cuestión

El jesuita Hans Zollner es uno de los principales expertos en prevención y tratamiento de casos de abusos a menores por parte del clero. Hombre de la máxima confianza del Papa en este asunto, psicólogo, presidente del Child Protection Center en la Universidad Gregoriana y miembro de la comisión que Francisco creó a su llegada para tratar una cuestión que se ha convertido en un asunto principal de este pontificado. Prueba de ello es la histórica reunión convocada en febrero en el Vaticano con todos los presidentes de las conferencias episcopales del mundo. Zollner, que recientemente ha liderado el proyecto de creación de un máster para la prevención de abusos, no pone paños calientes: algunos países han avanzado mucho y otros, como España, pueden hacer “mucho más”.

Laicos de Osorno destacan nuevo cargo de Scicluna y llaman a cambiar las leyes canónicas

[Osorno laity highlight Scicluna's new position and call for changes in canon law]

CHILE
BioBioChile

November 13, 2018

By Manuel Stuardo and Pedro Abarzúa

La Organización de Laicos de Osorno destacó el nombramiento de Charles Scicluna, como nuevo secretario adjunto de la Congregación para la Doctrina de la Fe, pero aseguraron que hay que cambiar las leyes canónicas.

Corte de Apelaciones desecha posibilidad de revertir la expulsión de Precht del sacerdocio

[Court of Appeals dismisses possibility of reversing Precht's expulsion from the priesthood]

CHILE
BioBioChile

November 12, 2018

By Valentina González and Erik López

La Corte de Apelaciones de Santiago desechó la posibilidad de revertir la expulsión del sacerdocio del ex Vicario de la Solidaridad, Cristián Precht, investigado por presuntos abusos sexuales.

Arzobispo que investigó a Iglesia chilena asume cargo clave en el Vaticano

[Archbishop who investigated the Chilean Church assumes key Vatican position]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 14, 2018

By Juan Paulo Iglesias

El Papa nombró a Charles Scicluna, actual titular de la arquidiócesis de Malta, secretario adjunto de la Congregación para la Doctrina de la Fe.

La primera señal fue a fines de enero pasado. Tras la polémica desatada por sus dichos sobre el obispo Juan Barros al concluir su viaje a Chile, el Papa designó al arzobispo Charles Scicluna enviado especial para recabar antecedentes sobre la situación del entonces obispo de Osorno. El llamado “007 del Vaticano”, como lo califican algunos medios italianos, volvía así a la primera línea de la lucha contra los abusos en la Iglesia. Sin embargo, hoy el regreso fue completo. El Papa lo nombró “secretario adjunto de la Congregación para la Doctrina de la Fe”, es decir número tres del organismo encargado de velar por la doctrina y llevar a cabo las investigaciones ante las denuncias de abusos contra religiosos.

Corte de Apelaciones rechaza recurso de protección de Precht contra Arzobispado de Santiago

[Appeals court rejects Precht's appeal against the Archbishop of Santiago]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 12, 2018

By Claudia Soto

El tribunal de alzada descartó un actuar arbitrario de parte de la institución religiosa al aplicar cautelares al exsacerdote en proceso de investigación previa, según la ley canónica.

En un fallo unánime, la Séptima Sala de la Corte de Apelaciones de Santiago rechazó el recurso de protección que el ex sacerdote Cristián Precht interpuso contra el Arzobispado de Santiago, tras descartar un actuar arbitrario de parte de la institución religiosa al aplicar cautelares al exsacerdote en proceso de investigación previa, según la ley canónica.

Bishops delay votes on combating church sex abuse crisis

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Associated Press

November 12, 2018

By David McFadden and David Crary

At the Vatican's insistence, U.S. Catholic bishops abruptly postponed plans Monday to vote on proposed new steps to address the clergy sex abuse crisis roiling the church.

Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said he was told on the eve of the bishop's national meeting to delay action until after a Vatican-convened global meeting on sex abuse in February.

"We are not ourselves happy about this," DiNardo told reporters in an unusual public display of frustration at a Vatican pronouncement.

"We are working very hard to move to action — and we'll do it," he said. "I think people in the church have a right to be skeptical. I think they also have a right to be hopeful."

Sexual abuse claim against deceased Metro Detroit priest credible, says Detroit Archdiocese

DETROIT (MI)
Click on Detroit

November 11, 2018

By Dane Sager Kelly

An allegation that a priest who died in 1994 sexually abused a child has been found to be credible, the Archdiocese of Detroit said.

The archdiocese said in a news release Sunday that the complaint against Monsignor Thaddeus Ozog was brought to a review board and shared with prosecutors.

Ozog served as pastor or associate pastor at parishes in Detroit, Birmingham, Wayne, Waterford, Flat Rock and Hamtramck.

It is unknown if the allegation against Ozog was found in documents turned over by Roman Catholic dioceses across Michigan in a state investigation of sexual abuse by priests.

The "Gold Standard" Returns – Amid Abuse Mess, Pope Restores Scicluna To CDF

VATICAN CITY
Whispers in the Loggia

November 13, 2018

By Rocco Palmo

Especially as yesterday's Vatican move to nix the US bishops' votes on several crisis-spurred reforms had the effect of detonating an ecclesial bomb of confusion and outrage, this Tuesday's latest salvo from Rome is all the more significant: six years since "The Most Dangerous Man in the Vatican" was quietly slipped out of town, Archbishop Charles Scicluna is coming home to the "Holy Office."

At Roman Noon, the Pope named the 59 year-old Maltese (above right) as adjunct secretary of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith – a second #3 official, joining the Bronx-born Archbishop Gus DiNoia OP, another Ratzinger favorite alongside whom Scicluna worked closely during his first CDF tour. In a unique arrangement not seen for the Curia in a half-century, however, the announcement added that Scicluna "will remain archbishop of Malta," where he was recently given an auxiliary to help balance his already increased Roman workload.

(Correcting an earlier part of this piece, while DiNoia reached the retirement age of 75 in July – and has already voiced a hope to return to the US upon its acceptance – earlier this year, Francis asked the Yale-trained theologian to remain in post for the time being. Considering CDF's vastly expanded role as the global church's clearinghouse of abuse cases – now including accusations against bishops – on top of its traditional role as guardian of doctrine, the provision of two additional top officers tracks with the rapid growth of the caseload and related issues.)

Philadelphia Archdiocese Lay Out Reparations Plan for Victims of Clergy Sex Abuse

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
NBC 10

November 13, 2018

By Dan Stamm

The creation of an independent commission to review church policies will be led by former U.S. Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell.

A week after the Archdiocese of Philadelphia said that it would pay financial reparations to victims of clergy sex abuse, even from years ago, the Church is revealing how it will carry out the compensation program.

The Independent Reconciliation and Reparations effort will be funded by the archdiocese, which said it was not sure how much money would be required but that the financial commitment was "significant."

Protests expected as church leaders gather to discuss sexual abuse crisis

BALTIMORE (MD)
ABC News

November 13, 2018

By Meghan Keneally and Pete Madden

Protests are slated to take place in Baltimore this week as church leaders gather at the annual General Assembly of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops to discuss the ongoing sexual abuse crisis.

Several prominent groups advocating for the rights of survivors of sexual abuse by clergy have planned demonstrations outside the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront as U.S. bishops contemplate their response to the widening scandal, described by one observer as "The Catholic Church's biggest crisis since the Reformation."

An event that was expected to culminate in steps toward increased transparency and accountability took a sudden turn on Monday morning when Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, announced in his opening remarks that a pair of votes on proposed policy changes to address the abuse crisis would be delayed "at the insistence" of the Vatican.

DiNardo, who told the assembled church leaders he was informed of the order late Sunday, said he was "disappointed" but remained "hopeful" progress could be made.

'Punished' for being sexually abused in York County: Jehovah's Witnesses' culture of cover-up

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

November 13, 2018

By Mike Argento

THE CHURCH ISOLATES ITS MEMBERS, SHAMES AND SHUNS VICTIMS WHO COME FORTH AND INSTRUCTS ELDERS TO KEEP REPORTS SECRET. AND CHILDREN ARE BEING ABUSED.

Sarah Brooks was 17, riding in her dad’s pickup, when she told him.

She had always been a daddy’s girl, she said. She was a tomboy growing up, playing with the boys, and later, when she could wield a wrench, working on cars with her dad. After some detours in life, she would work as a welder. She liked working with her hands, and she and her dad were close.

It was hard to tell her dad. She knew what had been happening to her was wrong. She knew that it needed to stop. She felt deep shame and deep guilt. She was the victim, but still, she felt that what had happened to her was her fault, that she was a horrible, dirty person. She knew there would be consequences. The people who did those things to her had warned her not to tell, they said that if she did, she would be ruining lives and that nobody would believe her and that she would be the one to suffer in the end.

Still, she needed to tell. It was wrong. Something had to be done. So, she told.

Sarah told her dad that Joshua and Jennifer had sexually abused her over a period of months, starting when she was 15. Joshua was Joshua Caldwell, a friend from church. Jennifer was Jennifer McVey, married to Sarah’s brother and having an affair with Caldwell. Caldwell was 12 years older than Sarah; McVey, six. Sarah had been working for the couple cleaning out houses that were in foreclosure.

She had met them through their church, the Yorkana Kingdom Hall of the Jehovah’s Witnesses, and thought that working for them would be safe and good, the church being a close and cloistered community.

Baton Rouge list of clergy members ‘credibly accused’ of abuse coming before end of January, diocese says

BATON ROUGE (LA)
NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

November 12, 2018

By Kim Chatelain

The diocese of Baton Rouge hopes to release the names of Roman Catholic clergy members under its auspices who have been “credibly accused” of abusing minors before the end of January, Bishop Michael G. Duca said.

In a letter Duca asked priests to read at weekend Masses, the bishop said last week researchers began an independent review of personnel files of priests and deacons who have served the diocese since it was carved out of the Archdiocese of New Orleans in 1961.

The Baton Rouge law firm Hebert, Spencer & Fry has been hired to perform the review. The lawyers have employed the accounting and consulting firm Postlethwaite & Netterville to assist. It will take a minimum of four to six weeks to complete the review, after which a comprehensive report will be turned over to the diocese, the letter said.

“Neither I nor any of my staff is involved in this review, and the auditors will have full access to clergy personnel files while they are on site,” Duca said in the letter. “From this information, I will compile a list of credibly and substantially accused clergy to be publish hopefully before the end of January.”

Michigan lay group releases clergy sex abuse reader for US bishops

LANSING (MI)
Religion News Service

November 12, 2018

“No More Victims,” a group of laypeople located in the diocese of Lansing, MI, has prepared a sweeping collection of accounts drawn from national and local headlines concerning the clergy sexual misconduct with respect to adults. The reader, titled “What We the Laity are Reading that has Shaken us to the Core,” is 32 pages long; it includes excerpts from some of the most shattering articles published on the subject in recent months and information about additional resources. The full reader is available here, and will be available online at nomorevictimsMI.org.

Copies of the reader have been sent to all U.S. Bishops in advance of their Fall Meeting, which begins today, Monday, Nov. 12. No More Victims hopes the bishops will regard the document as a vital resource and a tool in confronting the full problem of clergy sexual abuse in all its complexity and scope. It is not just Archbishop McCarrick who is the problem or clergy who abuse minors, but also clergy who engage in sexual misconduct with adults.

In the letter they wrote to the Bishops that accompanied the reader, No More Victims member Al Kresta writes, “As you deal with the scandal of McCarrick and abuse committed by bishops, we urge you to include in your concerns efforts to rid seminaries, dioceses and all Church institutions and structures of those who are involved in sexual misconduct with adults. We believe clergy sexual misconduct with adults is at the core of so many of the problems of the Church in the last many decades.”

Ex-priest in Pennsylvania was named, sued in sex abuse case, along with treatment center

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

November 12, 2018

By Jasmine Vaughn-Hall

In a news conference on Monday, a man named Allentown Diocese Bishop Alfred Schlert and former Bishop Edward Cullen in a lawsuit suing a former priest and a treatment center for priests, according to The Morning Call.

The man, now 29, alleges he was sexually molested by former priest Bruno Tucci between the ages of 10 and 12.

Church to name Alabama, Mississippi clergy accused of abuse

MOBILE (AL)
The Associated Press

November 12, 2018

Roman Catholic church offices in Alabama and Mississippi will publicly release the names of clergy members accused of sexually abusing minors over decades, church leaders said.

A statement from Archbishop Thomas J. Rodi of Mobile said each of the four Catholic dioceses in the two states will report the names of people who were removed from ministry after being accused of abuse.

Diocese offices are in Birmingham, Alabama, plus Jackson and Biloxi in Mississippi, and the archdiocese is in Mobile.

The Mobile office will release names involved in accusations dating back to 1950, Rodi said. He did not say when the list would be made public.

"It is a time-consuming effort to examine each clergy personnel file from the last almost seven decades. This effort is under way and will be completed as quickly as possible," Rodi said in the statement released Thursday.

The Biloxi diocese said it would forward any of its names to the office in Jackson should cases predate its 1977 founding.

Survivors of clergy child sex abuse tell U.S. bishops of rejection, pain

BALTIMORE (MD)
Catholic News Service

November 12, 2018

By Rhina Guidos

Luis A. Torres Jr. stood before a group of U.S. bishops during one of the most publicly watched of their fall annual meetings Nov. 12 in Baltimore and in doing so revealed to the world the reality that he has lived with since childhood: that he was abused by a priest.

"I'm not private anymore. Everyone knows," said Torres, a lawyer and member of the Lay Review Board of the Diocese of Brooklyn, New York, which examines policies for removing priests who have abused.

It was unclear but it seemed that the moment marked the first time he revealed the truth publicly. He also spoke of what he witnessed toward those who have come forward in the Catholic Church when they revealed what had happened to them at the hands of clergy.

"I witnessed a church that didn't understand or didn't seem to care, or worse, a church that was actively hostile to the children who had trusted and suffered under its care," he said. "A church that professed faith but acted shrewdly, a church that seemed to listen less to Christ's teachings and more to the advice of lawyers, a church that seemed less interested in those it had harmed."

He spoke of a church more concerned with the protection of assets than its people.

Ex-altar boy is first in Penn. to file lawsuit against Catholic Church since bombshell AG report

PENNSYLVANIA
NBC News

November 12, 2018

By Corky Siemaszko

The Allentown Diocese did not tell parishioners there was an admitted molesting priest in their flock

A former altar boy claimed in a lawsuit Monday that he was molested repeatedly by a Pennsylvania priest who had admitted sexually abusing another boy a decade earlier — and who had been cleared to work with kids by a New Mexico clinic for troubled clergy that was derided in Catholic circles as "Camp Ped."

Bruno Tucci, now 76, allegedly abused the altar boy — who is identified in court papers only as a 29-year-old "John Doe" — between 1999 and 2001 at the Our Lady of Mount Carmel parish in Nesquehoning, a small town 30 miles north of Allentown, Pennsylvania.

On one occasion, Tucci allegedly told the then pre-teen boy to "put his arms out like Jesus on the cross" while he fondled his exposed genitals, the lawsuit states.

"He is a broken young man," the accuser’s chief lawyer, Gerald Williams, said during a press conference in Philadelphia. "He veers from anger to despair to depression."

Bishop addresses clergy abuse in letter to Catholic Diocese of Baton Rouge

BATON ROUGE (LA)
WBRZ

November 11, 2018

By Trey Couvillion

In a letter read in all Baton Rouge Catholic parish masses today, Bishop Michael Duca said the church has hired a legal firm to fully investigate all personnel files that could shed more light on diocesan abuses in recent decades.

"This week an independent review was begun of all the personnel files of the priests and deacons who have served in our diocese since we were created out of the Archdiocese of New Orleans over a half century ago. The outside law firm of Hebert, Spencer & Fry, L.L.P. has been engaged to do the work, and it has hired the highly-respected accounting and consulting firm of Postlethwaite & Netterville, APLC to assist in performing this independent review," the letter said in part.

LC Catholic Diocese releases list of priests accused of sexual misconduct with minors

LAS CRUCES (NM)
KVIA

November 8, 2018

By Kate Bieri

On Thursday, the Diocese of Las Cruces released the names of 28 priests and religious "credibly accused" of sexual misconduct with minors.

Of the 28 priests on the list, 12 of them have died, according to the Diocese. Four of the priests have been "laicized," meaning they have been dismissed from their clerical state.

Some of the accusations were before the Diocese of Las Cruces was established in 1982, however, "the individuals are included because they served in the Diocese of Las Cruces at some point," according to the Diocese.

“By publishing this list, the Diocese of Las Cruces is seeking to be transparent and accountable," Bishop Gerald Kicanas wrote in a news release. "We invite anyone who may have been abused by church personnel to come forward and report that abuse to the proper authorities."

Vatican tells U.S. bishops not to vote on proposals to address sex abuse

CHARLOTTE (NC)
WSOC TV

November 12, 2018

By Allison Latos

The Vatican is ordering bishops in the U.S. to delay guidance on how to address sexual abuse allegations, which means it could be even longer before we learn which local priests have been accused.

Eyewitness News anchor Allison Latos has been investigating allegations in local churches for years and has questioned the Charlotte Diocese about when parishioners and the public will get answers.

Our View: Compensation fund for clergy-abuse victims is easy way out

WILKES-BARRE (PA)
Times Leader

November 12, 2018

We found it welcome news when it was recently revealed that most of the Roman Catholic dioceses in Pennsylvania — including Scranton — are now setting up victim compensation funds.

Those who suffered heinous crimes at the hands of priests deserve compensation for the trauma that not only destroyed the innocence of childhood but will be with them for the rest of their lives.

But we remain somewhat concerned the Catholic hierarchy is still intent on making a last-ditch effort to protect its own, a habit well-documented in this summer’s shocking grand jury report.

Some have suggested the funds could just be another device employed by church leaders to make problems go away without having to go through the pain of full transparency.

“The biggest drawback in a fund like this is that it does not force the institution to come clean with all the information that it has regarding the abuse,” lawyer Ben Andreozzi, who represents dozens of Pennsylvanians who claim abuse by priests, told the Associated Press.

It’s obvious what’s going on here.

Clergy recast ‘privilege’ for peers accused of sex abuse

BUFFALO (NY)
UBNow

November 8, 2018

By Charles Anzalone

When UB law professor Christine Pedigo Bartholomew studied “clergy privilege” — the legal rule shielding confidential communications of priests and clergy — she found priests often recast communications to make them fall outside this testimonial protection.

Clerics often wanted to divulge information concerning such sensitive encounters as people confessing to crimes, says Bartholomew. The clergy wanted to do the right thing, she says, and help the courts’ search for justice.

But something happened when it came to accusations of sexual abuse, according to Bartholomew’s extensive, comprehensive review of cases from the early 1800s to 2016 — the first time a legal scholar has reviewed and recorded every opinion on clergy privilege during that time.

Where otherwise forthcoming priests tried to find ways to divulge what they knew to law enforcement officials, they did the opposite — they “pushed for their clergy privilege” — when their fellow priests were targets of sexual abuse accusations, according to research Bartholomew published in October 2017 in the Virginia Law Review.

“It is as if clergy are saying, ‘We want to divulge and to help, except when clergy are accused of sexual misconduct,’” says Bartholomew, associate professor and director of law review. “When it comes to sexual accusations, clergy act to protect themselves.”

Clergy Abuse Survivor Says Names To Be Released "Step In The Right Direction"

OGDENSBURG (NY)
WWNYTV

November 11, 2018

"It's a step in the right direction."

As the Catholic Diocese of Ogdensburg plans to release the names of the remaining clergy members accused of being involved in its sex abuse scandal, it's something Jim Cummings, a survivor of clergy abuse, has been waiting for.

"I've talked to quite a few of the survivors and that's what they wanted also," said Cummings. "It was very clear."

Eight clergy members from the Diocese of Ogdensburg have already been named over the years. There are still at least 15 more who have yet to be revealed.

In a letter read at masses over the weekend, Bishop Terry LaValley writes that 'recent controversies in the Church make it necessary to release the rest of the names.

Greensburg, Pittsburgh Catholic dioceses to launch compensation fund for clergy abuse victims

PENNSYLVANIA
Trib Live

November 8, 2018

By Deb Erdley

In an apparent move to counter calls for new legislation to permit victims of clergy child sexual abuse to sue the Catholic church outside statute of limitations, diocesan officials across Pennsylvania announced they will create accounts to pay victims.

One by one, church leaders from Pittsburgh to Philadelphia on Thursday said each would establish its own victims’ compensation fund to be underwritten by resources of that diocese or archdiocese.

The announcements come in the wake of a bitter fight in the Pennsylvania General Assembly over legislation that would create a two-year window for adults who were sexually abused as children and can no longer seek recourse in the courts to file suit against their abusers and those involved in covering up such acts. The law is among four recommendations from a statewide grand jurythat found rampant clergy sexual abuse and cover-ups by church officials in dioceses across Pennsylvania over the last seven decades.

This fall, the state House approved the bill by a wide margin. But it stalled in the state Senate, where President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati, R-Jefferson County, proposed victims compensation funds as an alternative plan. The alternative, supported by the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference and the insurance industry, would operate outside of the courts.

Diocese of Allentown and Bishops Sued by Victim Alleging Sexual Abuse by Former Priest

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
NBC 10

November 12, 2018

By Dan Stamm

A 29-year-old man is suing a former priest and the Diocese of Allentown, alleging the priest abused him as a child, according to a Philadelphia law firm that filed the lawsuit.

The alleged victim, who is not named, claims Bruno Tucci, a former priest, sexually assaulted him when he was an altar boy at Mount Carmel Church in Nesquehoning in the late 1990s and early 2000s, according to the lawsuit, a copy of which was provided to NBC10.

As bishops meet on sex abuse, Vienna priest placed on leave

VIENNA
Tribune Chronicle

November 13, 2018

By Bob Coupland

Diocese investigates new allegation of inappropriate behavior with a minor

A priest who serves a parish in Vienna has been placed on administrative leave while an investigation takes place on an allegation of inappropriate behavior with a minor.

The Rev. John Jerek, vicar for clergy with the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown, said in a news release Monday the Diocese received an allegation against the Rev. Denis G. Bouchard, pastor of Queen of the Holy Rosary Parish.

Jerek said the Diocesan Review Board recommended to Youngstown Bishop George V. Murry that further investigation be done to determine its credibility and substantiation. The board includes a psychologist, representatives of the Trumbull and Mahoning County Children Services Board, attorneys, medical doctors, the dean of the college of health and human services at Youngstown State University, a Lutheran pastor, a Catholic priest and a parent.

Jerek said it is diocesan policy to place Bouchard on leave while the investigation takes place. The Rev. Carlos Casavantes has been appointed administrator of Queen of the Holy Rosary Parish.

Queen of the Holy Rosary Parish is staffed by the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter, which celebrates the liturgy in the “Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite used before the reforms of the Second Vatican Council,” according to its website. The Vienna location also has a school, St. Joseph the Protector Learning Center.

Jerek said because this is an ongoing investigation, additional comments cannot be made at this time.

New allegations emerge against DC priest charged with abusing teen girl in 2015

WASHINGTON (DC)
WTOP

November 10, 2018

By Liz Anderson

A D.C. priest who was arrested and charged with sexually abusing a teenage girl in May of 2015 is also being accused of inappropriately touching two other girls during the same month and year, court documents say.

Urbano Vasquez, 46, was arrested on Wednesday on charges of second degree child sexual abuse.

According to court documents, a girl who is now 17 accused Vasquez of inappropriately touching her chest area after she and her family helped sell food and snow cones at a cookout at the Shrine of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church. She was 13 at the time.

The second victim, who was 16 at the time of the alleged abuse, said Vasquez kissed her on the mouth while they were in the rectory dining area. The girl’s mother had left the room to prepare food, but walked back into the dining room as it happened. The mom confronted him, and Vasquez apologized, saying he didn’t know what came over him.

Ignore the Vatican: Bishops can forge ahead on stopping abuse, cover-up

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter

November 13, 2018

By David Clohessy

Speculation can be fun. But it's not helpful, at least not in the short run. And few would dispute that the U.S. church can't afford the luxury of "taking the long view" when it come to the safety of kids right about now.

So let's stop guessing why Vatican officials nixed the nearly meaningless measures U.S. bishops had planned to discuss this week in Baltimore.

Instead, let's get practical and ask: What should U.S. bishops do now to protect kids, expose wrongdoers and heal the wounded?

The answer is actually fairly straightforward. Bishops must use their already vast powers to help stop more abuse and cover-up.

Let's start with two steps that are already being done across many U.S. dioceses sporadically but should be expanded, steps that do not require Vatican approval or new U.S. church policies:

President of U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Delivers Opening Address at Start of 2018 General Assembly in Baltimore, Nov. 12-14

BALTIMORE (MD)
USCCB

November 12, 2018

Baltimore—Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops addressed the body of bishops at the opening sessions today in Baltimore for the General Assembly taking place in Baltimore.

Cardinal DiNardo’s full address follows:

“Saint Augustine wrote, ‘In order that weakness might become strong, strength became weak.’ My dear brothers, in light of this morning’s news, the nature of my address changes. We remain committed to the specific program of greater episcopal accountability that we will discuss these days. Consultations will take place. Votes will not this week. But we will prepare ourselves to move forward.

Allow me to now address the survivors of abuse directly.

Where I have not been watchful or alert to your needs, wherever I have failed, I am deeply sorry. The command of our Lord and Savior was clear. ‘What I say to you, I say to all: watch!’ In our weakness, we fell asleep. Now, we must humbly beg God’s strength for the vigil ahead.

About Those ‘Gay Clergy Networks’

UNITED STATES
National Catholic Register

November 12, 2018

By Jennifer Roback Morse

COMMENTARY: Church leadership won’t solve this current crisis unless it confronts homosexual practice among the clergy and especially the networks of homosexually oriented clergy operating to protect each other.

I hesitate to wade into areas in which I have no direct information. But I feel compelled to point out the illogic of continuing to claim that the current clergy sex abuse and cover-up scandal is unrelated to homosexual activity among Catholic priests.

At this late date, too much circumstantial evidence has emerged to ignore: This crisis would not exist, but for homosexual practice among the clergy and especially the networks of homosexually oriented clergy operating to protect each other.

The most recent denial of the obvious comes to us from longtime Vaticanista and editor of La Stampa, Andrea Tornielli. In an underreported article from Sept. 14, he asks: “Is the root, the origin of the problem of abuse really to be found in the homosexuality of priests?” He replies:

No priest abuse in Shreveport Diocese since '86, administrator says

SHREVEPORT (LA)
The Shreveport Times

November 9, 2018

The top administrator for the Catholic Diocese of Shreveport announced late Friday that the diocese had received no reports of clerical abuse of children since at least 1986.

The Rev. Peter B. Mangum, diocesan administrator, made the announcement in a prepared statement just before 5 p.m.

Mangum said the announcement was based on a review of the files of all priests, living and dead, who served the diocese since its creation in 1986. Before then, the diocese was constituted differently as the Diocese of Alexandria-Shreveport.

Mangum said the review included priests in the diocese and those in religious orders, whether native or foreign born. The review included priests, bishops and deacons, he said.

Mangum was named diocesan administrator in August following the departure of Bishop Michael Duca for the Diocese of Baton Rouge. A new bishop has not been appointed.

Syracuse priest named as child sex abuser by Buffalo diocese

SYRACUSE (NY)
syracuse.com

November 12, 2018

By Julie McMahon

A Syracuse priest has been named by the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo as a clergyman with substantiated allegations of child sex abuse against him.

The Rev. James Smyka, 74, was in residence at Assumption of Blessed Virgin Mary Church on Syracuse's North Side until recently.

He was listed on the Diocese of Syracuse website as a member of the clergy until today. He was also listed as a chaplain at St. Joseph's Hospital. A spokesman for St. Joe's said Smyka had not worked at the hospital since Oct. 8.

The Buffalo diocese identified Smyka one week ago as a priest with "substantiated claims of sexual abuse of a minor."

Buffalo woman's alleged abuser's name added to Diocese list of clergy sex abuse

BUFFALO (NY)
WIVB

November 8, 2018

By Marissa Perlman

We shared with you Evelyn Safe's story in May.

She claimed Buffalo Priest, Father Robert D. Moss sexually abused her more than 25 years ago

She was an adult at the time, and never expected to see his name on that clergy sex abuse list, because the Buffalo Diocese was only revealing cases involving minors.

But all that changed on Monday. "Seeing him smoking outside the Church, he would kiss everybody on the lips."

Evelyn Safe says something seemed off about Father Robert Moss, or "Father Bob."

She first met him at age 12 at Queen of Heaven Church in West Seneca. He became friends with her family.

Albany measure would compel clergy members to report child abuse

ALBANY (NY)
CNHI

November 8, 2018

By Joe Mahoney

ALBANY: Measure would compel clergy members to report child abuse.

With New York's Catholic bishops grappling with a clergy sexual abuse crisis, an influential GOP state senator from Western New York is calling on fellow lawmakers to repeal the statute of limitations for offenses involving the sexual attack of children and offer whisteblower protections to those who report molestations.

“This legislation will ensure that those in positions of authority are held accountable and will give victims the ability to seek prosecution of their abuser," Sen. Patrick Gallivan, R-Elma, said in a statement.

Gallivan said his bill would extend the statute of limitation under the civil practice law to recover damages for physical and psychological injuries caused by child molesters.

The bill, filed while lawmakers are scheduled to remain on recess until January, would also add clergy members to the list of those who are mandated to report suspected child abuse to law enforcement.

But Gallivan's legislation is expected to face a hurdle, erected by the outcome of this week's elections that concluded with Democrats winning enough Senate seats to take control of Albany's upper chamber in less than eight weeks.

Priest on EWTN: Church won’t link sex abuse crisis to homosexuality over fear of gay lobby

WASHINGTON (DC)
LifeSiteNews

November 12, 2018

By Lisa Bourne

The Catholic Church’s sex abuse crisis is about the culture of homosexuality in the priesthood, Mgsr. Charles Pope told EWTN’s Raymond Arroyo on the World Over program Thursday night (Nov. 8).

It’s also about the bishops’ failure to impart the Church’s moral teaching, he said, and is not rooted in clericalism.

“We have to be clear, I think, that this is about homosexuality,” Pope stated, adding that that is “a big culture of that in the priesthood.”

“It’s also about not preaching and teaching moral teachings of the Church, not insisting upon them, allowing for dissent to go unchecked,” Pope said. “I think again it comes back to teaching, governing and sanctifying.”

The blogger and priest of the Archdiocese of Washington had broached these three duties conferred upon bishops and priests in his recent National Catholic Register column in which he implored the bishops of the U.S. to restore order in the Church. Arroyo brought Pope on to the program to discuss the content of the column and to discuss the abuse crisis as the U.S. Bishops’ meeting approaches November 12-14.

Pope taps sex abuse reformer for key Vatican role

DENVER (CO)
Crux

November 13, 2018

By Inés San Martín

Amidst a growing global concern over the Church’s handling of abuse cases and cover-up, Pope Francis has appointed the Vatican’s former top prosecutor on cases of clerical sexual abuse, Maltese Archbishop Charles Scicluna, back in his former office, though the prelate will continue heading the Church in Malta.

The decision to name Scicluna adjunct secretary, meaning the third most important official, of the Vatican’s Congregation of the Faith (CDF) was announced on Tuesday, and it follows a year in which the prelate was tapped by Francis to lead a thorough investigation of the situation of the Church in Chile.

Among other things, the CDF handles accusations of abuse against clergy, and Scicluna also serves as president of a board of review for abuse cases in the office. He had been a full-time member of the CDF until 2014, when Pope Benedict XVI appointed him to Malta.

At the CDF Scicluna worked under then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, and the two are credited with the sentencing of thousands of abuser priests, including the late Mexican Father Marcial Maciel Degollado, founder of the Legionaries of Christ, in 2006.

Vatican cancels U.S. bishops’ vote on sex abuse reform measures

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Associated Press

November 12, 2018

At the Vatican's insistence, U.S. Catholic bishops abruptly postponed plans Monday to vote on proposed new steps to address the clergy sex abuse crisis roiling the church.

Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said he was told on the eve of the bishop's national meeting to delay action until after a Vatican-convened global meeting on sex abuse in February.

"We are not ourselves happy about this," DiNardo told reporters in an unusual public display of frustration at a Vatican pronouncement.

"We are working very hard to move to action — and we'll do it," he said. "I think people in the church have a right to be skeptical. I think they also have a right to be hopeful."

The bishops are meeting through Wednesday in Baltimore and had been expected to consider several steps to combat abuse, including a new code of conduct for themselves and the creation of a special commission, including lay experts, to review complaints against the bishops.

WDSU Editorial: The Archdiocese of New Orleans clergy sex abuse list released, more must be done

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
WDSU

November 10, 2018

WDSU President and General Manager Joel Vilmenay issues an editorial after the release of the Archdiocese of New Orleans clergy sex abuse list.

Pittsburgh diocese announces another priest accused of sex abuse

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Trib Live

November 12, 2018

By Chuck Biedka

Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh announced Monday that another priest accused of sex abuse was placed on administrative leave in September.

Bishop David Zubik said the Rev. Richard M. Lelonis, 73, was placed on leave pending further investigation into two allegations of sexual abuse of minors.

Diocesan officials said they “spoke with two individuals in early September. One alleged abuse by Father Lelonis in the early 1970’s. The second individual alleged that Father Lelonis attempted abuse around 1980,” according to a statement from diocese spokesman the Rev. Ronald Lengwin.

Following that meeting, the diocese immediately reported the allegations to the District Attorney of Allegheny County.

At the same time, Lelonis was removed from his assignment in the diocesan tribunal, where he had served full-time since 1995. According to the statement, Lelonis denied both allegations.

Pope gives Vatican's sex abuse expert new role amid crisis

VATICAN CITY
The Associated Press

November 13, 2018

By Nicole Winfield

Pope Francis is giving a prominent new role to the Vatican's most trusted sex crimes investigator as he seeks to improve the Holy See's response to abuse at a time when the church and papacy are facing a credibility crisis.

Francis on Tuesday named Archbishop Charles Scicluna as a deputy, or adjunct secretary, at the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the Vatican office that processes sex abuse cases globally.

Scicluna had been the congregation's chief prosecutor for a decade and was credited with pushing through measures making it easier to defrock pedophiles. But Pope Benedict XVI sent him to his native Malta in 2012 as bishop after Scicluna's tough line ruffled too many feathers in the Vatican.

Scicluna's new appointment is symbolically significant and will also give him greater say in the day-to-day running of the congregation, even though he technically retains his post in Malta.

On Vatican order, U.S. bishops halt plans to vote on reforms in wake of sex abuse scandal

BALTIMORE (MD)
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

November 12, 2018

By Peter Smith

A much-anticipated gathering of Roman Catholic bishops began with a sudden, anticlimactic announcement that they would not be voting on proposals responding to the crisis of sexual abuse in the church.

Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said Monday morning that the Vatican Congregation for Bishops insisted the bishops wait until after Pope Francis convenes a February Vatican summit of top bishops on the worldwide crisis before adopting any policies. Cardinal DiNardo said he did not know what role Pope Francis had personally in the directive.

"At the insistence of the Holy See, we will not be voting on the two action items in our docket regarding the abuse crisis," said Cardinal DiNardo, archbishop of Galveston-Houston. One was a set of "standards of accountability for bishops," the other the establishment of a special commission for handling complaints against bishops.

"The Holy See has asked that we delay voting on these so that our deliberations can inform and be informed by the global meeting," said Cardinal DiNardo.

Cardinal DiNardo apologized for the late announcement, saying the Vatican conveyed its message only late Sunday.

At Vatican's behest, bishops postpone votes on clergy abuse measures

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Buffalo News

November 12, 2018

By Jay Tokasz

U.S. bishops meeting here this week were directed by the Vatican not to vote on two measures aimed at disciplining themselves in sexual misconduct cases.

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston said Monday that he received word from the Vatican telling the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops to delay their votes until the measures could be considered by all bishops worldwide at a special council planned for February.

“Consultations will take place; votes will not take place this week,” said DiNardo, president of the USCCB, in his opening address to more than 250 colleague bishops.

DiNardo said at a news conference later that the bishops were disappointed about the Vatican directive. But he called it a bump in the road to reforms, as the bishops seek to address a sex abuse scandal that has rocked the Buffalo Diocese and many others across the country.

"We have not lessened any of our resolve for actions," he said.

The 2018 Catholic clergy sex abuse crisis brings new energy — and anti-gay activists — into the survivors' movement

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Washington Post

November 13, 2018

By Michelle Boorstein

For nearly two decades, to be an advocate for survivors of Catholic clergy sex abuse was often to be a lonely protester, frequently ignored or sometimes even maligned as disrespectful by some Catholics and clergy.

That has changed dramatically since June, when clergy abuse scandals surfaced again in the American church. Enormous energy has been pumped into the movement, with parishes around the country holding crowded listening sessions on the topic, bishops making abuse the focus of their annual fall meeting this week and legislators finding new support for measures to expand statutes of limitation for child sexual abuse.

But the victims’ advocacy movement is also being transformed by bitter ideological divides among Catholics. That chasm is on display at the meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops in Baltimore.

Monday’s two public events were dominated by the older groups — research site BishopAccountability and SNAP — whose leaders focus on oversight and justice and participate less in the controversial debates over the perceived roles of celibacy and homosexuality in the crisis. Tuesday promised the first mainstream prominent appearance of Church Militant, a right-wing advocacy group and news site that routinely blames the scandals on homosexual priests and, since the crisis blew up this summer, has hammered Pope Francis and more liberal bishops, accusing them of being part of an elaborate coverup to shield gay clergy.

“I feel like they’re using victims for a political agenda and I’m concerned about that. They’re using this to kind of get to where they want to be,” SNAP’s regional director, Becky Ianni, said of Church Militant. “And I hate when someone uses victims. Victims aren’t conservative or liberal. We’re victims. And that’s what people need to focus on.”

Erie’s Persico ‘disappointed’ with delay on abuse votes

ERIE (PA)
GoErie.com

November 13, 2018

By Ed Palattella

Bishop is at national meeting of U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which planned to vote on new measures until the Vatican said to wait.

Erie Catholic Bishop Lawrence Persico said he was ready to act on the clergy abuse crisis when he met with his colleagues at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ national meeting in Baltimore this week.

On Monday, those efforts slowed — the result of action from the Vatican rather than from Persico and his American counterparts.

“I was disappointed when we were told this morning that we are not to vote on several items we had on our agenda,” Persico said in a statement that the Catholic Diocese of Erie released.

The Vatican Prevents US Bishops from Voting on Measures Designed to Prevent Clergy Abuse

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

November 12 2018

Today, the US Conference of Catholic Bishops met to discuss, among other things, their response to the clergy sex abuse crisis. Instead, the Vatican kicked the can down the road.

The measures that Cardinal Daniel DiNardo had put on the agenda for the American bishops to discuss and vote on were, at best, half-measures. Yet they still were steps forward and were especially symbolic in representing that the USCCB was taking seriously the issue of bishop accountability. Given the waves of recent reports of bishops hiding files, protecting serially abusive priests, and releasing incomplete lists, how could they not?

We are disappointed that the Vatican has forced the USCCB to delay their vote. We hope that this means that, at the meeting between the pope and presidents of bishops’ conferences in February, concrete steps will be taken to ensure accountability for bishops who cover-up abuse. It is clear that a real response is needed in order to prevent future abuse, deter more cover-ups, and ensure accountability for bishops who fail to protect children and vulnerable adults. Today’s action by the Vatican makes us wary that such a real response will be taken.

Catholic Diocese of Savannah releases names of priests involved in sexual abuse cases

SAVANNAH (GA)
WTOC

November 13, 2018

By Sean Evans

The Catholic Diocese of Savannah is releasing a list of priests who the church says have been “credibly accused” of abusing minors.

It’s an action catholic churches across the country have taken.

Bishop Gregory Hartmayer released the list late last week. He says it’s in a spirit of transparency and the hope of continued healing for the survivors of abuse.

Out of the 16 priests on the list, 10 have died, one’s whereabouts are not known, three are no longer priests, and two are serving time in prison.

Former Savannah Priest Wayland Brown is on that list of 16. Brown pleaded guilty to sexual assault charges just last month in South Carolina and was sentenced to 20 years in prison.

According to a Diocese representative, priests on the list were investigated internally in cooperation with civil authorities. When credible evidence was found, it was presented to a Lay review board which affirmed the credibility.

The Bishop then made the final determination.

An abuse victim advocate we spoke to says while this is a step in the right direction, she believes the Church could do even more.

U.S. bishops delay action on sex abuse at Vatican request

WASHINGTON (DC)
Think Progress

November 12, 2018

By Joshua Eaton

The Vatican has delayed a vote by U.S. Catholic bishops this week that would have held church leaders accountable for clergy sex abuse.

At a meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, on Monday, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, told the heads of all 196 U.S. dioceses and archdioceses that Pope Francis wanted them to hold off on a vote until after a meeting of worldwide church leaders in Rome in February.

The bishops had planned to vote Wednesday on a code of conduct for bishops and a lay commission to investigate violations.

“At the insistence of the Holy See, we will not be voting on the two action items,” DiNardo, who is archbishop of Galveston-Houston, in Texas, told his fellow bishops, according to The Washington Post.

Advocates for survivors of clergy sexual abuse, who have long accused the church of being unwilling to hold senior leaders accountable, were quick to criticize the move.

“We’re dealing with the crisis, right here, right now,” Becky Ianni, D.C. regional head of the victims’ group SNAP, told The Washington Post. “Yes, it’s a global problem, and they need to discuss it there [in Rome], but the U.S. needs to come up with something right now.”

Malone among several U.S. bishops under fire for abuse complaints

BALTIMORE (MD)
Buffalo News

November 13, 2018

By Jay Tokasz

Buffalo Bishop Richard J. Malone is among several Catholic bishops gathered here this week who are under fire in their home dioceses or former dioceses over how they handled sexual misconduct complaints.

That list even includes Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo, the current president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, and Archbishop William E. Lori, the head of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, which is hosting the USCCB’s fall assembly.

“The evidence is abundant. Some of the men at this meeting this week, themselves, while speaking about transparency have failed to be transparent, have failed to rescue victims,” said Anne Barrett Doyle, co-founder of BishopAccountability.org, an advocacy group that since 2002 has chronicled cases of clergy sex abuse around the world.

Doyle specifically named Malone, who has resisted calls to resign by prominent Western New York Catholics.

The Buffalo Diocese has been roiling since late February with revelations of alleged sex abuse and cover-up that escalated in August with the leak of internal diocesan documents to a television station and again in October, when “60 Minutes” aired an episode that was highly critical of Malone’s handling of abuse claims.

But Doyle also said Malone has plenty of company among his brother bishops, and it’s one of the reasons bishops are reticent to criticize each other on their records of handling abuse cases.

She mentioned current Syracuse Bishop Robert J. Cunningham, who served as chancellor and vicar general in the Buffalo Diocese prior to being appointed as a bishop in Ogdensburg.

“In Buffalo, he controlled the management of accused clergy for many, many years. He was the point man for former Bishop Henry Mansell, and he did nothing to take those abusers out of ministry, as we now know,” said Doyle.

Cunningham continues to refuse to identify the names of accused Syracuse Diocese priests, she said.

'Geographic solution' for predators? Hide bad priests in parishes with lots of immigrants


GET RELIGION

November 12, 2018

By Terry Mattingly

Back in my Denver days in the late 1980s, I started work on a large project that, at first, was viewed with great favor by my editors at The Rocky Mountain News (RIP).

The starting point: The city included several growing Protestant churches, evangelical and Pentecostal, that were attracting many, many Hispanic believers. As you would expect, it didn’t take long to realize that most of them were former Roman Catholics or were the children of former Roman Catholics.

The goal was to report (a) why this was happening and (b) how this affected life inside large, extended families of Hispanics who now worshipped in radically different sanctuaries.

After a week or two of work, we dropped that first goal — because one of the most common answers was raising lots of questions that made editors uncomfortable.

Yes, many people were leaving the Catholic church for predictable reasons, from their point of view. They thought the preaching in evangelical/Pentecostal churches was stronger and “more biblical.” They liked the thriving Sunday schools for their children and youth programs for teens. They liked the contemporary church music, blending folk, pop and Latino themes.

National Catholic Reporter is simply right

NEW YORK (NY)
Patheos

November 13, 2018

By Mark Shea

So when the Right Wing Noise Machine (Catholic edition) has been so wrong about so much so many times for so long that only a fool would continue to unquestioningly trust their judgment, it is prudent to consider the possibility that the people who saw and reported accurately on the problem of priestly abuse nearly 30 year ago might, despite the denunciations of the Lie Machine, have something to say worth listening to. The National Catholic Reporter is exactly such a paper and, despite the reflexive booing and hissing from the Francis-hating, Trump adoring Cult of Wrong about Everything, I believe in prudence. Here is their recent, devastating, and spot on editorial to the bishops:

Dear brothers in Christ, shepherds, fellow pilgrims,

We address you as you approach this year’s national meeting in Baltimore because we know there is nowhere left to hide.

It’s over.

All the manipulations and contortions of the past 33 years, all the attempts to deflect and equivocate — all of it has brought the church, but especially you, to this moment.

It’s over.

Even the feds are now on the trail. They’ve ordered that you not destroy any documents. The Department of Justice is conducting a national criminal investigation of how you’ve handled the clergy sex abuse scandal. It is a point in our history without precedent. We want you to know that you aren’t alone in this moment, you’ve not been abandoned. But this time it must be different. This time it won’t be easy.

Charlotte diocese to delay releasing names of priests accused of sexual abuse

CHARLOTTE (NC)
WCNC TV

November 12, 2018

The Diocese of Charlotte is now expected to wait several more months before deciding whether to release the names of priests accused of past sex abuse.

The delay comes as Pope Francis intervened during a meeting of the most powerful Catholics in the country.

The nation's Catholic bishops started a week-long conference today in Baltimore with plans of voting on two sex abuse response proposals, but at the urging of the pope, the bishops postponed those votes.

Diocese of Charlotte Communications Director David Hains said the impact will be felt here as the diocese considers whether to publish the names of accused priests.

"We're waiting for input from the bishops as to the best way to go about this," Hains said. "It's a little disappointing. We had hoped to get that input this week and get to work making that decision."

Pope Francis' requested last-minute delay means the nation's bishops will hold off on any decisions until he and the world's bishops hold a special meeting to discuss clergy abuse in February.

"The American bishops will probably meet in March to act on whatever is decided at the February meeting," Hains said. "We will be using input from the March meeting on our decision on posting the list...So, it looks like it is going to take a bit longer but I have no doubt that the end result will be a policy that complements the steps we have already put in place to protect children."

Boston Archdiocese, Clerical Sex Abuse Advocates React To U.S. Bishops' Policy Change Delay

BOSTON (MA)
WBUR Radio

November 12, 2018

The Archdiocese of Boston said in a statement today that Cardinal Sean O'Malley will keep advocating for new steps to hold bishops accountable, and greater transparency when it comes to clerical sex abuse.

That reaction came after the Pope requested today that U.S. Bishops delay any votes on policy changes in the church until a global meeting of church leaders in February. Bishops including O'Malley are meeting this week in Maryland and had planned to consider a series of measures including a new code of conduct for bishops.

The Archdiocese says the delay was "unexpected."

"Cardinal O’Malley will continue to vigorously advocate for revising the Dallas Charter to hold bishops accountable, greater transparency including the release of names of clergy accused of abuse and increased lay involvement and leadership," it said in the statement.

But advocates for sexual abuse victims say the delay by the Pope shows a lack of concern on behalf of the Catholic Church, including Boston-based attorney for clergy sex abuse victims Mitchell Garabedian.

Catholic bishops’ missed opportunity on clergy sex abuse scandal

BOSTON (MA)
Boston Globe

November 12, 2018

By John L. Allen Jr.

Heading into this week’s fall meeting of the Catholic bishops of the United States in Baltimore, the forecast was for dramatic action on the clerical sexual abuse scandals that have rocked the Church for the last six months, during what some dubbed its “summer of shame.”

All that changed on Monday, when the president of the conference, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, announced that late Sunday the bishops were asked to stand down by the Vatican, awaiting a three-day summit in February in Rome convened by Pope Francis for the presidents of all the bishops’ conferences in the world to discuss the abuse crisis.

Some bishops are still pressing for non-binding votes on some of the action items, such as a new code of conduct subjecting themselves to the same “zero tolerance” policy as everyone else, as a way of sending a signal to Rome ahead of that February gathering. For right now, it remains to be seen what may result.

So, what gives? Could the Vatican actually be this tone-deaf, or is there some other explanation for the request for a delay?

The Catholic Church proves incapable of exorcising clergy sex abuse — again

WASHINGTON (DC)
]Washington Post

November 12, 2018

By Editorial Board

IT IS EVIDENT that the Catholic Church is incapable on its own of exorcising the scourge of clergy sex abuse. The scandal raged unchecked for decades and, even after it was exposed in 2002 by the Boston Globe , has been met by the church hierarchy with denial, temporizing, stone walling and half-measures.

Even as the bishops of America’s 196 Catholic dioceses and archdioceses gathered in Baltimore Monday to grapple with the latest major revelations — a Pennsylvania grand jury’s report from August detailing decades of abuse involving more than 1,000 victims and at least 300 priests — they were stopped in their tracks by an abrupt message from the Vatican, which asked them to hold off. That intercession arrived along with a warning from Pope Francis’s ambassador in the United States, Archbishop Christophe Pierre, who seemed to scoff at the proposal, which the bishops had been set to vote on, to establish a lay commission that would assess bishops’ misconduct — “as if we were no longer capable of reforming or trusting ourselves,” as he put it.

That remark crystallized the arrogance that has often characterized the church’s stance even as countless exposés have laid bare the culpability of its leaders. From high and low, the church has broadcast its conviction that its own transgressions are no worse than that of other institutions; that state statutes of limitations that shield dioceses from lawsuits should be preserved; that no foothold may be allowed for mechanisms to discipline bishops who have enabled abuse by transferring pedophile priests from parish to parish.

Voices of moral clarity have been heard from within the church, urging genuine change. “Brother bishops, to exempt ourselves from this high standard of accountability is unacceptable and cannot stand,” Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said in a speech to the gathered bishops Monday following that of Mr. Pierre. “Whether we will be regarded as guardians of the abused or the abuser will be determined by our actions.”

Yet, more often than not, those voices have been ignored.

The pontiff has summoned bishops from around the world to the Vatican for a meeting to address the scandal in February; this summit, we are urged to believe, will once and for all set the church on a path toward surmounting the blight of abuse. The fact of that pending event was the proffered pretext for the church’s request that the U.S. bishops put off two items on their agenda this week in Baltimore: establishing the lay commission to review complaints against bishops, and adopting a code of conduct for themselves — the first such codified ethical guidelines.

The agenda was modest, and Rome’s intervention is telling. Again and again, the Vatican pays lip service to the suffering of victims. Again and again, it undercuts its own assertions of contrition.

Advocacy groups blast Vatican delay of U.S. Catholic bishops' vote on sexual abuse scandal

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Tribune Review

November 12, 2018

By Stephen Huba

Catholics who were hoping for a substantive response from the U.S. bishops this week to the clergy sexual abuse crisis will have to wait a little longer.

The bishops, meeting in the 2018 General Assembly in Baltimore, learned Monday the Vatican had asked them to postpone a vote on a series of proposals addressing their part in the crisis. Pope Francis first wants to hold a summit on the scandal in February.

The two measures that were on the agenda were a code of conduct for bishops and the creation of a lay commission to review violations of the code.

Advocacy groups reacted angrily to the Vatican’s delay of the vote.

Survivors Call Vatican Telling US Bishops To Wait On Abuse ‘Totally Unacceptable’

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Tablet

November 12, 2018

By Christopher White

Following Monday’s shock announcement that the Vatican has requested the U.S. Catholic Bishops to delay voting on new standards for bishop accountability, survivors of sexual abuse and bishop accountability activists decried the move as a “totally unacceptable.”

Terence McKiernan, co-director of BishopAccountability.org, called the move a “preemptive strike” by the Vatican against U.S. bishops as they seek to respond to the current crisis of sexual abuse and its cover-up “in a modest way.”

Peter Isley, a survivor of clerical sexual abuse who now works with the organization Ending Clergy Abuse, said the decision from the Vatican effectively means, “We care more about our organization and our princely titles and positions” than enacting measures of accountability.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) is gathered in Baltimore this week for its General Assembly, in which they were expected to enact new standards of conduct and accountability for bishops engaged in sexual abuse or its cover-up. At the start on Monday’s meeting, however, USCCB president, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, announced that he had received a request on Sunday afternoon to postpone the vote until after a global summit on the crisis at the Vatican in February.

According to DiNardo, the request came from Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet, prefect of the Vatican’s Congregation for Bishops.

Diocese probes another claim of sexual abuse

YOUNGSTOWN (OH)
The Vindicator

November 12, 2018

By Justin Dennis

A month before the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown named 34 clergymen associated with the diocese who have been credibly accused of sexually abusing a minor, it received one new allegation that is now under investigation.

The diocese last week also amended that list of accused to include one more name: One of the former friar’s accusers, who traveled with him as an altar boy in the mid-1980s, said the man forced himself on him when he was a pre-teen in St. Aloysius Parish in East Liverpool.

Simultaneously, a former Youngstown diocese priest, John F. Warner of Louisville, said he has worked to clear his name after the diocese’s Oct. 30 release, which exposed another disgraced priest with the exact same name.

The diocese announced Monday it placed the Rev. Denis G. Bouchard, pastor of Queen of the Holy Rosary Parish in Vienna, on administrative leave while it investigates a sex-abuse allegation made against the priest.

Vatican tells U.S. bishops to delay votes on new sex abuse protocols

NEW YORK (NY)
America Magazine

November 12, 2018

By Michael J. O’Loughlin

Catholic bishops from the United States gathered in Baltimore this week for their annual fall meeting had planned to discuss and vote on new protocols aimed at holding bishops accountable for sexual abuse. But in a surprise announcement at the start of the meeting, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo told bishops that the Vatican has asked them to delay the vote until after a February meeting in Rome with the heads of bishops conferences from around the world to discuss sexual abuse.

“Although I am disappointed that we will not be taking these actions tomorrow,” said Cardinal DiNardo, the head of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, “I remain hopeful this additional consultation will ultimately improve our response to the crisis we face.”

Bishops had been scheduled to vote on three “action items” related to abuse: approving new “Standards of Episcopal Conduct” for bishops, the creation of a new commission to handle allegations of abuse against bishops, and new protocols for bishops who are removed or who resign from office due to sexual misconduct with adults or minors.

Pittsburgh diocese places another priest on leave following abuse accusations

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

November 12, 2018

By Kevin Flowers

Bishop David Zubik placed a 73-year-old priest on administrative leave Sept. 12 pending investigation of two allegations of sexual abuse of minors, the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh said Monday.

The diocese said in a news release that two people had spoken to diocesan officials in early September about alleged incidents involving the Rev. Richard M. Lelonis. One incident allegedly occurred in the early 1970s, and the second is alleged to have occurred about 1980.

The allegations subsequently were reported to the Allegheny County District Attorney's office, the diocese said. Father Lelonis, who has denied the allegations, according to the diocese, was removed from the diocesan tribunal, which he had served full time since 1995.

His suspension is at least the fifth the diocese has announced since the release in August of a statewide grand jury report on accusations of sexual abuse by priests over several decades.

Making sense of Vatican’s no-fly order to US bishops on abuse crisis

DENVER (CO)
Crux

November 13, 2018

By John L. Allen Jr.

In the run-up to the U.S. bishop’s fall meeting this week in Baltimore, the expectation - to be clear, the expectation of the bishops themselves - was that they’d be making some important decisions on the clerical sexual abuse crisis that’s rocked the Church for the last six months.

Instead, what unfolded Monday morning basically sucked all the oxygen out of the room, when Cardinal Daniel Dinardo of Galveston-Houston, president of the conference, announced that the Vatican has asked the bishops to delay doing anything until February, when Pope Francis plans to convene a summit of presidents of bishops’ conferences around the world to discuss child protection.

It’s worth noting that the action communicated to the U.S. bishops late Sunday came after Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet, Prefect of the Vatican’s Congregation for Bishops, and French Archbishop Christophe Pierre, the Vatican’s ambassador to the U.S., met Pope Francis in Rome on Saturday.

Priest Still Not Listed As Abuser Despite Old & New Allegations

PITTSBURGH (PA)
KDKA TV

November 12, 2018

By Andy Sheehan

Since the release of the grand jury report on clergy sex abuse, Bishop David Zubik has been steadfast that he has never protected predator priests or covered for their actions.

“I think I’ve done an awful lot of good and I can say honestly, absolutely I did not do anything that would be part of a cover-up,” Zubik said in August.

But KDKA-TV News has learned that more than two months ago, two people reported that they had been sexually abused by Fr. Richard Lelonis and that as of Monday, Lelonis was still not listed on the diocesan website as having a credible allegation against him.

A man who did not wish to be identified confirmed to KDKA-TV’s Andy Sheehan that both his uncle and cousin reported to the diocesan clergy abuse line that Lelonis abused them while a pastor at Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton Parish in the late 1990s, but despite its own policies, the diocese has taken no action.

Sheehan: “The diocese says now when they have a credible allegation, they report it to the District Attorney, they remove the priest from ministry and they make that name public. Have those things happened?”
Victim’s relative: “They have to make it known publicly and then also treat the victims or the accusers pastorally as well and reach out to them and neither of those things have been done.”

KDKA has also learned that Lelonis is one of several dozen priests accused in the past of sexually abusing a minor but who have successfully had their names redacted from the grand jury report.

November 12, 2018

Grand Jury Fallout: Lawsuit Filed Against Catholic Church

PENNSYLVANIA
WBRE/WYOU-TV

November 12, 2018

More fallout from the "Pennsylvania Grand Jury Investigation".. into sexual misconduct in the Catholic Church. During a news conference in Philadelphia -- lawyers announced a new lawsuit aimed at a former priest with ties to our area. The Allentown Morning Call" is reporting "Father Bruno Tucci" -- formerly of Nesquehoning in Carbon County -- was charged with molesting a boy in 1981. Investigators say it happened in Ocean City, Maryland.

The reports goes on to say Tucci was first investigated here in 2002 --- and was later de-frocked and removed from service.

No charges were ever brought in Pennsylvania.. because the statute of limitations had expired.

Hot Seat: Church sex abuse and unanimous jury verdicts

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
WDSU News

November 12, 2018

By Travers Mackel

The WDSU Hot Seat focuses on two big topics in the area.

The first revolving around the Catholic Church sex abuse. A list of 57 priests and clergy members accused of sexual abuse was released by the New Orleans Archdiocese.

The second topic is the unanimous jury verdict that is now state law.

Widened inquiry 'may not go far enough'

NEW ZEALAND
Otago Daily News

November 13, 2018

By Chris Morris

The Roman Catholic Bishop of Dunedin says an expanded royal commission into the abuse of children may not go far enough.

Bishop Michael Dooley said yesterday he was "relieved'' to hear children abused while in the care of faith-based institutions would now be included.

The decision was announced by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Internal Affairs Minister Tracey Martin yesterday.

But the terms of reference specifically excluded private settings for abuse involving faith-based institutions, and it remained unclear whether others - like a church presbytery or a priest's car - were included.

That meant the victims of a paedophile priest like Fr Magnus Murray, convicted of abusing four Dunedin boys in family homes, the presbytery and on trips, could yet miss out. Bishop Dooley said if that was so, the inquiry needed to go further.

All parishioners were in the pastoral care of their priest, so any abused by clergy needed to be heard, he believed.

Let's Talk Accountability and Healing In The NM Catholic Church

ALBUQUERQUE (NM)
KUNM

November 12, 2018

By Hannah Colton

Let's Talk New Mexico 11/15 8a: Survivors of clergy sexual abuse continue to come forward in New Mexico, and many people are calling for the Catholic Church to come clean about what they knew and when. On the show, we'll explore what accountability could look like for crimes that happened years or decades ago. What are the effects of Church secrecy around clergy abuse? And how can communities heal from these kinds of trauma?

We’d like to hear from you. Email LetsTalk@KUNM.org or call in live during the show, Thursday morning at 8 here on 89.9 KUNM.

Lawsuit: 2 priests raped same altar boy in Asan

GUAM
Pacific Daily News

November 8, 2018

By Haidee V. Eugenio

Two priests raped and molested the same Asan altar boy during different times in the 1970s, according to a $10 million clergy sex abuse lawsuit filed on Thursday.

Monsignor Jose Ada Leon Guerrero and Father Raymond Techaira, now both deceased, allegedly sexually abused, molested and raped plaintiff M.C.A. when he was an altar boy at the Nino Perdido y Sagrada Familia Parish in Asan.

M.C.A., in his lawsuit, said Leon Guerrero abused him when he was around 8 years old, on several occasions throughout 1974 in the priest's upstairs bathroom.

"Guerrero would remind MCA not to tell anybody since MCA was a chosen child," the lawsuit says. Leon Guerrero was transferred to another parish in 1974.

Inclusion of churches in state abuse inquiry welcomed

NEW ZEALAND
Newstalk ZB

November 13, 2018

A victims advocate says including religious organisations in the inquiry into abuse in state care is a good start.

Following an outpouring of requests, the Government has decided to expand its inquiry to include faith-based institutions, and those who were victims of physical abuse.

Male Survivors Aotearoa chair, Phillip Chapman told Kate Hawkesby they're just one of the organisations which asked for the inquiry to be expanded.

"We did put in a submission, like many others, and asked for it to be expanded. The Prime Minister said they had heard, so I would be interested how many of those submissions must have said the same thing."

While the scope of the inquiry has been expanded, Chapman said it's still not as extensive as he would like.

"Abuse in this country happens in lots of places as we know. This is widespread in this country."

Schuylkill County man sues former Allentown Diocese priest for sexual abuse

READING (PA)
Reading Eagle

November 12, 2018

By Beth Brelje

The 29-year-old claims the priest, who had ties to Berks County churches, abused him at a Carbon County church between 1999 and 2001.

A 29-year-old Schuylkill County man is accusing a former Allentown Diocese priest with ties to six Berks County churches of sexually abusing him at a Carbon County church between 1999 and 2001.

The man, identified in the lawsuit as "John Doe," claims that when he was 10 to 12 years old, he was abused by the Rev. Bruno M. Tucci at Our Lady of Mount Carmel parish in Nesquehoning.

Tucci served in Berks County between 1971 and 1981.

The July state grand jury report detailing hundreds of abuse cases within the church mentions a victim reporting abuse by Tucci in 1977-78 but does not identify the location.

The suit was filed electronically Monday in Lehigh County Court, attorney Gerald J. Williams said.

The courthouse was closed Monday for Veterans Day, so the filing will not appear docketed until Tuesday.

Jehovah's Witness child sex abuse survivor urges examination of NZ church

NEW ZEALAND
Stuff

November 11, 2018

By Tom Hunt

It started with movies and bowls, but soon Luke Hollis was a young boy performing sexual acts on a Jehovah's Witness man four-times his age.

To hear Hollis, now 28 and living in Wellington, talk of the ordeal that tormented him for years during his childhood in England, it is remarkable how matter-of-fact he is.

But he is the first to admit he has a vendetta against his former church.

He wants to see Jehovah's Witnesses held accountable and he wants the church to apologise. But mostly, he wants it to fully shed its "two witness" rule – a policy he argues makes the church a beacon for child sexual predators.

Government expands state care abuse inquiry to include church abuse

NEW ZEALAND
NewsHub

November 12, 2018

By Megan Sutherland and Tova O'Brien

A proposed inquiry into the historical abuse of children in state care has been extended to include abuse within faith-based institutions.

The Royal Commission into state care abuse has been in a preliminary process since February, and on Monday Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern stated Cabinet agreed to expand the inquiry.

The newly named inquiry will now be known as the Royal Commission into Historical Abuse in State Care and in the Care of Faith-Based Institutions, which reflects the wide scope of the inquiry.

Britain's most senior Catholic faces questions over church's handling of child sex abuse claims

ENGLAND
The Telegraph

November 11, 2018

By Patrick Sawer

England's most senior Catholic clergyman faces embarrassment this week when he appears before an inquiry to answer claims he ignored child sex abuse allegations against his priests, including the son of JRR Tolkien.

Cardinal Vincent Nichols, the Archbishop of Westminster, is to give evidence in person to the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, which is investigating how a number of key institutions in Britain handled sex abuse claims.

The hearing will examine the Cardinal’s former Archdiocese of Birmingham, where he served as Archbishop from 2000 to 2009.

It will look into the handling of allegations against Father John Tolkien, the son of JRR Tolkien, author of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, who was questioned by police in 2002 over an abuse allegation, but was never charged.

Cardinal Nichols faces claims that senior church officials allowed Fr Tolkien, who died in 2003, to carry on working until around the time Cardinal Nichols took over at the Archdiocese, despite senior officials promising an alleged victim years earlier that he would be forced to retire.

Catholic Church in Guam to File for Bankruptcy

GUAM
Yahoo View

November 7, 2018

Archbishop Michael Byrnes made the announcement at a press conference Wednesday.

Lawsuit: Church Allowed Pedophile Priest to Return to Ministry

PENNSYLVANIA
Daily Beast

November 12, 2018

A 29-year-old man is suing former Pennsylvania priest Bruno Tucci, along with current and former Catholic Church officials, for alleged sexual abuse he endured between 1999 and 2001. Tucci is among the 301 priests named in a recent Pennsylvania grand-jury report that claims more than 1,000 victims were abused by priests over the past several decades. Unlike the vast majority of these cases, the alleged victim’s case falls within the statute of limitations for prosecution in Pennsylvania. The lawsuit—which also names the Allentown Diocese Bishop Alfred Schlert, former Bishop Edward Cullen, and a treatment center for priests—alleges that Tucci groped the man, identified as “John Doe,” when he was between the ages of 10 and 12 and an altar boy at Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Nesquehoning.

Church abuse victim: “He would talk with my parents, then come up to my room and touch me”

SPAIN
El Pais

November 12, 2018

By Oriol Guell

Manuel Vilar Herrero recounts the assaults he suffered as a child at the hands of a priest who was “worshiped” by his mother and father. The following testimony is one of several making up an EL PAÍS series exposing decades of offenses by the clergy

Artana in the province of Castellón is a deeply religious parish of 2,000 people, but for years it has been hiding a dark secret, one that Manuel Vilar Herrero decided to expose. “I was victimized by the priest,” says Manuel, 50, referring to Antonio Gil Gargallo. “It started with fondling and kisses on the neck. Then he went on to touch my behind and my genitals. You could see him getting excited. He would end up rubbing himself against me, fully dressed, until he came in small convulsions.”

The abuses began in 1982 when Manuel was 14. “We had finished EGB [primary school] and we had to leave the village for BUP [secondary school] in Nules. At that time, the priest chose a number of us to come to his home to speak about morality. They were informal meetings and we would watch a film, and we could smoke and drink a bit of alcohol. It was at these meetings that the abuse started,” he says.

Lawsuit: 2 priests raped same altar boy in Asan

ALLENTOWN (PA)
Pacific Daily News

November 8, 2018

By Haidee V. Eugenio

A Philadelphia-based law firm announced Monday that it will file a lawsuit against the Diocese of Allentown.

The law firm Williams Cedar will file a civil suit in Lehigh County against the diocese stemming from the alleged sexual abuse by a Catholic priest named in the Pennsylvania grand jury report released this summer, according to a news release.

The defendants will include former priest Bruno Tucci, the Diocese of Allentown, its current and immediate past bishops and the religious order the Congregation of the Servants of the Paraclete. The lawsuit alleges that Tucci abused a minor and alleges negligence on behalf of the diocese that allegedly failed to screen priests properly and properly investigate complaints, according to a news release.

Former Altar Boy Sues Church Over Alleged Sexual Abuse

WATERBURY (CT)
The Associated Press

November 8, 2018

A former Connecticut altar boy who says he was sexually abused by a now deceased Roman Catholic priest has sued the Archdiocese of Hartford.

A former Connecticut altar boy who says he was sexually abused by a now deceased Roman Catholic priest has sued the Archdiocese of Hartford.

The Republican American reports that the lawsuit filed Wednesday by 46-year-old Kevin Distasio alleges negligence and reckless and wanton conduct by the archdiocese.

Distasio says in the suit he was abused in 1980 by the Rev. Walter Vichas while an altar boy at Blessed Sacrament Church in Waterbury. Vichas died in 2008.

The suit says the archdiocese failed to supervise Vichas or remove him from his duties. It also says the archdiocese failed to investigate Vichas' suspicious conduct and failed to develop a policy for reporting clergy sexual abuse.

Nashville Diocese releases list of 13 former priests accused of sex abuse

NASHVILLE (TN)
Catholic News Service

November 9, 2018

The Diocese of Nashville, as part of its ongoing commitment to transparency, accountability and pastoral care, has published the names of the 13 former priests who served in the diocese who have been accused of sexually abusing a minor.

Of the 13, nine are dead and two are in prison. None are in active ministry.

The Tennessee Register, Nashville's diocesan newspaper, said the names were being released after consultation with the priests' council and Diocesan Review Board, which is made up almost entirely of laypeople not employed by the diocese.

The list is posted on the diocese's website and includes the priests' assignments based on official diocesan records.

Files on abuse cases were shared with the Davidson County district attorney general's office nearly 20 years ago.

The names are those of priests against whom an allegation of abuse was made either while an active priest or following his death. Following the report, an investigation was begun, followed by a review of the facts and information obtained.

Archdiocese of Santa Fe faces 5 new sex abuse suits

SANTA FE (NM)
Santa Fe New Mexican

November 9, 2018

By Phaedra Haywood

Five new lawsuits were filed against the Archdiocese of Santa Fe this week by people who say they suffered lifelong problems after being sexually assaulted as children by Catholic clergy in Central and Northern New Mexico.

Three of the suits involve people who allege they were assaulted by priests in Albuquerque, one involves allegations against an Abiquiú priest and one involves allegations against a priest formerly serving in Ranchos de Taos.

The archdiocese did not respond to a phone message and email seeking comment for this story.

“These men and women in our communities carried the secret of their sexual abuse by the priests around all their lives, having been shamed and warned about telling anyone, living with various levels of inexplicable anxiety or depression, and now for the first time are coming forward and getting professional help,” said Levi Monagle, an attorney in the Law Offices of Brad D. Hall, which filed the complaints Thursday in state District Court in Albuquerque.

The lawsuits allege abuses occurred as long ago as 1950 and as recently as the late 1980s.

Lawsuit accuses former Waterbury priest of sexual abuse

WATERBURY (CT)
Republican-American

November 7, 2018

By Jonathan Shugarts

The Archdiocese of Hartford was sued Wednesday by a former city man who is accusing a deceased priest of sexually abusing him when he was an altar boy in 1980.

Rev. Walter Vichas, who died in 2008 at the age of 83, is named in the suit as the abuser of Kevin Distasio who is now 46.

The suit was filed in Waterbury Superior Court and accuses the archdiocese of negligence and reckless and wanton conduct in connection to Vichas’ alleged sexual exploitation of the boy while Vichas served as a priest at Blessed Sacrament Church on Robbins Street.

The suit claims that Distasio’s parents were devout Catholics who enrolled their son at the Blessed Sacrament School, which was part of the church. Distasio placed “his faith and trust in his church, its clergy, and its priests, which included Rev. Walter A. Vichas, and placed his trust in the same for his moral and spiritual welfare,” the suit alleges.

Vichas heard Distasio’s confessions, according to the filing. Distasio was raised to believe that priests were to be “obeyed without question” and that priests “represented God and that priests were a form of Jesus Christ,” the suit alleges.

East Cobb Catholic priests respond to sexual abuse allegations

MARIETTA (GA)
East Cobb News

November 9, 2018

By Wendy Parker

A Catholic Church of St. Ann priest has responded to his parish’s membership this week after the Archdiocese of Atlanta published a list priests, deacons, seminarians and other religious workers it says have been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse of minors over many decade.

Two of those named in the report were a pastoral aide who was convicted of molesting two boys while working at St. Ann in 1999-2000, and a priest at a Canton parish who may have been at the East Cobb church on occasion in the early 1990s.

Rev. Wilton Gregory, the Atlanta Archbishop, said he was publicly identifying those on the list “in a spirit of transparency and the hope of continued healing for the survivors of abuse.”

On Friday, the Rev. Raymond Cadran, the St. Ann pastor, sent a letter to members of the Roswell Road parish, expressing “my deepest sorrow and anger and hurt over the actions of any LaSalette or anyone associated with our name who has caused hurt and pain to any of God’s precious children, young people and their families.”

He said that “all credible claims were handled in an appropriate and timely manner.”

Dioceses’ compensation funds shouldn’t end Pa. victims’ right to sue, advocates say

PENNSYLVANIA
WITF

November 9, 2018

By Katie Meyer

Seven of Pennsylvania’s eight Catholic dioceses have announced plans to create funds to compensate those abused by priests as children, for whom the statute of limitations has expired.

Some victim advocates said the funds are welcome; others said they give churches an easy out. But both camps agree, this shouldn’t be the end of the reforms.

The announcement of the funds came a few months after a landmark grand jury report documented decades of alleged child sexual abuse by clergy. It included a number of recommendations for dioceses and state lawmakers to fix longstanding problems that led to abuse going unreported.

One of those recommendations was a two-year window for retroactive lawsuits on old, statute-limited abuse cases against negligent institutions. In a bitter legislative battle, top lawmakers balked at passing a bill to create such a window.

They floated compensation funds as part of a replacement proposal. But the whole effort ultimately crashed.

Philadelphia archdiocese sets up victims’ reparation fund

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
Catholic News Service

November 2018

By Matthew Gambino

Acting on his promise to find new ways to support survivors of clerical sexual abuse, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput announced Nov. 8 that the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is creating a new reparations program open to anyone abused by clergy in the archdiocese.

Philadelphia’s archbishop made the announcement in his column on CatholicPhilly.com, explaining the archdiocese will fund the program and “pay the amounts that independent claims administrators deem appropriate.”

The Independent Reconciliation and Reparations Program seeks to compensate all victims but especially those whose claims are currently barred from civil lawsuits under Pennsylvania’s statute of limitations.

An effort in the state Legislature to allow a limited-time window on the statute for retroactive lawsuits against the Catholic dioceses in the state failed to come up for a vote in the Senate in October. The issue is thought to be dead because the current legislative session ends in mid-November.

Lawsuit: Priest abused 'chosen child'

GUAM
The Guam Daily Post

November 9, 2018

By Mindy Aguon

While the Archdiocese of Agana intends to file bankruptcy to resolve more than 180 sexual abuse lawsuits, another civil suit was filed in the Superior Court of Guam against the archdiocese seeking $10 million in damages.

Attorney David Lujan filed a lawsuit on behalf of his client M.C.A., who used initials to protect his identity.

The suit alleges M.C.A. was sexually abused by two priests when he served as an altar boy at the Niño Perdido y Sagrada Familia Catholic Church in Asan in the 1970s.

Francis put the brakes on Baltimore. Now what?

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Worthy Adversary

November 12, 2018

By Joelle Casteix

There is a lot to be said for being lazy.

I was going to write about the proposed Baltimore bishops’ meeting agenda yesterday, but put this blog post off until this morning. Good thing—because our pal Pope Francis made the whole meeting moot.

From the Washington Post:

Lawsuit filed against Archdiocese of Hartford over alleged sexual abuse

WATERBURY (CT)
WTNH

November 9, 2018

By Mario Boone

A lawsuit has been filed against the Archdiocese of Hartford over allegations of sexual abuse by a priest at a Waterbury church.

According to the lawsuit filed by Attorney Thomas McNamara Friday, the late Reverend Walter Vichas sexually assaulted then 10-year-old altar boy Kevin Distasio in 1980 at the Blessed Sacrament Church on Robbins Street in Waterbury.

"The sexual abuse was at the hands of Reverend Walter Vichas," McNamara told News 8 Friday.

Archdiocese: Sex abuse claim against late priest credible

DETROIT (MI)
The Detroit News

November 11, 2018

By Jennifer Chambers

The Detroit Archdiocese said Sunday it has determined that an allegation of sexual abuse of a minor by a monsignor to be credible and is asking anyone who has been abused to contact police.

Detroit Archdiocese spokesman Ned McGrath issued a statement saying an allegation involving Monsignor Thadddeus Ozog was brought to the archdiocesan review board and "has been deemed credible."

"The Detroit Archdiocese — as is its practice — shared the complaint against him with civil authorities," McGrath said in the statement dated Saturday. "The Review Board also commissioned an independent investigation of the allegation. When presented to the Review Board, the findings from that investigation were found to be credible, that is, having a 'semblance of truth.' "

McGrath declined to provide the age of the victim at the time of the alleged abuse, the year it is alleged to have happened, details or the current age of the person, other than to say he now is an adult.

The victim approached the archdiocese three years ago to report the abuse, McGrath said, but was unable to assist in an investigation at the time. The victim again contacted the archdiocese this summer and was able to assist the review board in its investigation, McGrath said.

Baton Rouge list of priests credibly accused of abuse to come within 'next few months'

BATON ROUGE (LA)
The Advocate

November 9, 2018

By Andrea Gallo

A list of Roman Catholic clergy credibly accused of sexual abuse within his diocese should be released within the next few months, Bishop of Baton Rouge Michael Duca said Friday in offering the greatest details yet of how he'll disclose information about problem priests.

Duca released his first column Friday for the diocese’s Catholic Commentator newspaper and wrote that “this moment in our lives” demanded reflection on the sexual abuse crisis that has pummeled the church for decades. He will head next week to Baltimore for an assembly of U.S. bishops, in which he and others will vote on a series of reforms to investigate abuse accusations against bishops.

Baton Rouge Catholic Diocese hires auditors to review clergy abuse files, list to come in 2019

BATON ROUGE (LA)
The Advocate

November 10, 2018

By Andrea Gallo

Baton Rouge Bishop Michael Duca has hired a law firm and an auditing firm to scrutinize clergy files and to help the Catholic Diocese complete a list of clerics who were credibly accused of sexual abuse, which should become public by the end of January 2019.

Catholic bishops across the state have announced intentions to release names of credibly accused clergy members, but Duca is the only one thus far who has announced a third-party review of files. Duca said in an interview Saturday that he wants the Diocese of Baton Rouge to receive the equivalent of a clean audit once all records have been inspected.

Catholic Diocese names 2 Carlsbad priests involved in sex abuse scandal

CARLSBAD (NM)
Carlsbad Current-Argus

November 9, 2018

By Jessica Onsurez

The alleged abuse occurred in the 1950s and 1970s.

Two Carlsbad Catholic priests were among the names of 28 clergy "credibly accused" of sexual misconduct with a minor.

Kerry Guillory and Casilda Pudei served as clergymen in Carlsbad in the 1970s and 1950s, respectively.

The names were released by the Catholic Diocese of Las Cruces Thursday, in response to Attorney General Hector Balderas who sought personnel files of priests accused of child abuse.

"By publishing this list, the Diocese of Las Cruces is seeking to be transparent and accountable, and we invite anyone who may have been abused by church personnel to come forward and report that abuse to the proper authorities," said Bishop Gerald Kicanas, the Apostolic Administrator of the Las Cruces diocese in a news release.

Pudei was noted by the diocese as deceased.

The diocese said Pudei was assigned to St. Edward School from 1956 to 1957.

The abuse allegedly occurred in 1957 and was reported to the diocese in 1993.

Philadelphia Archdiocese Opens Victims’ Compensation Fund, but What About Lawsuits?

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
The Legal Examiner

November 10, 2018

By Eric T. Chaffin

The Philadelphia Archdiocese recently announced the establishment of a new victims’ compensation fund for victims of child sexual abuse. Overseeing the fund is a team of former government officials, including a former Philadelphia district attorney, former Philadelphia judge, and former Senate majority leader. These officials are to make sure the compensation fund runs independently of the Catholic Church.

The fund’s purpose is to help compensate victims who cannot pursue financial compensation through the courts because their claims lay outside the statute of limitations.

So far there has been no indication as to what the maximum potential individual payouts will be, or the total dollar amount available in the fund for distribution. Seven other Roman Catholic dioceses in the state are also taking steps to establish similar funds.

Lawsuit alleges Diocese returned pedophile Carbon County priest to service

ALLENTOWN (PA)
69 News

November 12, 2018

Priest sent to New Mexico facility for 'treatment'

A Lehigh County man alleges he was sexually abused by a Carbon County priest years after the priest was sent to a New Mexico facility, where he was to receive treatment for allegedly assaulting at least one other child.

The Philadelphia-based law firm Williams Cedar on Monday announced that it filed a lawsuit in Lehigh County Court against retired priest Bruno M. Tucci and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Allentown. The victim alleges the abuse occurred between 1999 and 2001 while he served as an altar boy at the Our Lady of Mount Carmel parish in Nesquehoning, Carbon County.

The suit also names former Bishop Edward Cullen, curent Bishop Alfred Schlert and the Congregation of the Servants of the Paraclete.

Tucci, who now lives in Maryland, was a priest in the Allentown Diocese from April 1971 through March 2002 and served at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel from 1986 until his retirement in 2002. The Diocese includes Berks, Carbon, Lehigh, Northampton and Schulykill counties.

The lawsuit alleges that Diocese officials were notified in 1991 that Tucci allegedly sexually abused a 14-year-old boy years earlier. During a meeting with a Diocese official, Tucci allegeldy admitted that he had indeed molested the victim as reported, according to court papers. The lawsuit alleges that victim wasn't Tucci's only victim.

Vatican orders US bishops to delay taking action on sexual abuse crisis

BALTIMORE (MD)
CNN

November 12, 2018

By Daniel Burke

The Vatican has told the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to delay voting on measures to hold bishops accountable for failing to protect children from sexual abuse, the president of the conference said in a surprise announcement Monday morning.

In his announcement, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo said he was "disappointed" by the Vatican's decision, which he said he learned of on Sunday afternoon. Pope Francis met with his ambassador to the United States, Archbishop Christophe Pierre, on Saturday, according to the pope's public schedule.

Pierre is in Baltimore and addressed the body of bishops on Monday morning, though he did not mention the Vatican's insistence that the US bishops delay their vote. The US Conference of Catholic Bishops gathers about 200 bishops from around the country twice a year to debate and adopt new policies.

A Vatican spokesman did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Pope Francis will convene a meeting of bishops from around the world in February to address the sexual abuse crisis, which has roiled the church on several continents, including North America, South America and Australia.

Diocese investigating Vienna pastor after accusation of inappropriate behavior with minor

YOUNGSTOWN (OH)
WYTV

November 12, 2018

The Diocese of Youngstown is investigating an accusation against Rev. Bouchard

A Vienna pastor has been accused of inappropriate behavior with a minor.

The Diocese of Youngstown is investigating an accusation against Rev. Denis Bouchard, pastor of Queen of the Holy Rosary Parish.

The Diocesan Review Board will determine the allegation's credibility and substantiation.

Priest on leave as Y'town diocese investigates another claim

YOUNGSTOWN (OH)
The Vindicator

November 12, 2018

A priest at a Vienna church has been placed on administrative leave by the Catholic Diocese of Youngstown pending an investigation into a claim that he engaged in inappropriate contact with a minor.

Rev. Denis G. Bouchard, Pastor of Queen of the Holy Rosary Parish will be on leave as the diocese investigates the allegation, a news release said.

The leave comes after the Diocesan Review Board met and made a recommendation to Bishop George V. Murry, that further investigation take place.

The diocese said they will not comment any further because of the ongoing nature of the investigation.

Los focos de la tercera asamblea de la Conferencia Episcopal en un año

[Third Episcopal Conference to focus on abuse crisis]

SANTIAGO, CHILE
La Tercera

November 12, 2018

By Tomás Molina J.

El debut de los administradores apostólicos y la situación del obispo Silva, imputado por encubrimiento, marcarán la reunión que se realizará en Santiago y se prolongará hasta el viernes.

Generalmente son dos las asambleas plenarias que organiza la Conferencia Episcopal de Chile año a año, pero en medio de la crisis que afecta a la Iglesia católica chilena por los abusos de sexuales y de poder perpetrados por clérigos, hoy inicia el tercer encuentro entre los obispos nacionales durante este 2018.

La gestión de los abusos de la Iglesia española preocupa en el Vaticano

[Management of abuse crisis in Spanish Church worries the Vatican]

SPAIN
El País

November 11, 2018

By Daniel Verdú

Autoridades eclesiales en Roma y España critican el diseño de la comisión creada por la Conferencia Episcopal al considerarla un mero lavado de imagen

La Santa Sede mira desde hace tiempo de reojo hacia España. Los escándalos de abusos surgidos en Alemania, Irlanda o, incluso Francia no han tenido correspondencia hasta ahora en un país donde la Iglesia ha estado involucrada en todos los estamentos educativos desde hace décadas. Han pasado ocho años ya desde que el Vaticano, entonces bajo el mandato de Benedicto XVI, publicó las líneas guía para la prevención y tratamiento de los abusos en España (como en tantos países). Entre otras cosas, se emplazaba a trasladar los casos a la justicia civil, pero en España algunas denuncias no han llegado ni siquiera de mano de los obispos que las conocían. La realidad constatada en Roma es que casi ninguna diócesis española ha hecho nada para aplicar esas normas con seriedad y la comisión creada recientemente no cuenta con elementos para ser tomada en consideración.

“El cura que me violó era un depredador, un cazador de niños”

["The priest who raped me was a predator, a child hunter"]

MADRID, SPAIN
El País

November 12, 2018

By Joaquín Gil

Los claretianos mantuvieron a un sacerdote tras conocer sus agresiones sexuales en una escuela de Madrid entre 1975 y 1978. El religioso pasó por un colegio mayor

El guía turístico Fernando García-Salmones y el profesor Enrique Sacristán arrastran el mismo pasado. Ambos estudiaban en 1975 en el colegio Claret de Madrid. Y ambos fueron violados —según revelan a EL PAÍS— por el mismo sacerdote, J. P. V., un carismático cura que frisaba entonces la cincuentena y que falleció en octubre de 2009 tras recibir un homenaje de sus antiguos alumnos.

Archbishop’s view of accountability wanders far afield from US law

BOSTON (MA)
The Boston Globe

November 11, 2018

If the article “In abuse scandal, spotlight squarely on bishops” (Page A1, Nov. 4) had been published in a Catholic publication, it would be an authentic sign that there has been an institutional conversion of bishops’ accountability. For now, Catholics must rely on the secular media for in-depth investigative journalism of its church’s conduct.

Critics of Catholicism in the United States have charged that the Roman Catholic Church’s highest allegiance is to a foreign power: the pope and the state of Vatican City. This is substantiated in the article when Archbishop William Lori of Baltimore reveals, “I thought if I committed a crime against a young person or in any serious way violated my responsibilities that the Holy See would step in and take me out of office.”

It’s incredible that he would defer to the Holy See to determine whether he had violated any US law. In one sense, he abdicates personal responsibility for his actions. He reveals a deeper mind-set that doesn’t take seriously adherence to the laws of this country.

Critics of Sharia law, fearful of its practice here, are oblivious that the Roman Catholic Church’s canon law has trumped adherence to the American legal system by American Catholic bishops.

The Rev. Emmett Coyne

Ocala, Fla.

The writer is a retired priest with the Diocese of Manchester in New Hampshire.

Looking at Child Sexual Abuse Through a Two-Year Window

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
The Legal Intelligencer

November 10, 2018

By Christopher Munley

On Aug. 14, the Pennsylvania Attorney General’s office released a grand jury report (report) on Catholic clergy sexual abuse after a two-year investigation that revealed that more than 300 priests sexually abused more than 1,000 children over seven decades in six of the state’s eight Roman Catholic dioceses.

The report, which included Allentown, Erie, Greensburg, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh and Scranton (Pennsylvania’s two other dioceses, Philadelphia and Altoona-Johnstown had been the subjects of earlier grand jury reports that found similarly damaging information about clergy and bishops in those dioceses), painted a blistering picture of church officials routinely covering up crimes until the perpetrators were too old to prosecute or litigate.
This report has now reignited a debate about whether to eliminate the statute of limitations for future civil and criminal cases involving child sexual abuse as well as how to address the problem for older victims of past crimes. The issue for these sexual abuse victims is how do they seek justice?

Among other policy recommendations in the report, jurors specifically recommended that the state eliminate the criminal statute of limitations for child sexual abuse and give otherwise time-barred victims a “two-year window” to file civil lawsuits. The grand jury said that “no piece of legislation can predict the point at which a victim of child sexual abuse will find the strength to come forward.”

The grand jurors called for the suspension of the statute of limitations for civil suits to allow victims to seek justice because: “We saw victims; they are marked for life, and many of them wind up addicted, or impaired, or dead. Our proposal would open a limited window, offering them a chance, finally, to be heard in court.”

Religious institutions to be included in state abuse inquiry

NEW ZEALAND
Radio NZ

November 12, 2018

By Chris Bramwell

The Government's inquiry into the abuse of children in state care will be expanded to include the abuse of children in the care of religious institutions.

The Inquiry is to be called the Royal Commission into Historical Abuse in State Care and in the Care of Faith-Based Institutions, to reflect its expanded scope.

The Royal Commission was formally established in February to be chaired by the former Govenor-General Sir Anand Satyanand, with the terms of reference, budget and additional inquiry members to be announced after consultation and Cabinet approval.

Its initial scope was to cover circumstances where the state directly ran institutions like child welfare institutions, borstals or psychiatric hospitals, and where the government contracted services out to other institutions, but as of today that will be expanded to include children in the care of faith-based institutions

Religious groups and church abuse survivors have been lobbying to be included in the inquiry since it was announced.

It will begin hearing evidence from January next year with the first interim report, which will be focussed on state care, to be reported back by the end of 2020.

A final report containing the Royal Commission's findings and recommendations will be submitted to the Governor-General in January 2023.

The Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, said it was critical the Government got the Royal Commission right and the scope and purpose of the Inquiry has been carefully considered.

"Today paves the way for us to confront a dark chapter of our national history by acknowledging what happened to people in state care, and in the care of faith-based institutions, and to learn the lessons for the future."

Lawyers surprised by numbers still lodging civil claims in historical sexual abuse cases

AUSTRALIA
The Courier

November 9, 2018

By Leanne Younes

A lawyer, who was one of the first to represent historical sexual abuse victims, has noticed a rise in civil law suits since the National Apology on 22 October 2018 and the start of the Commonwealth Redress Scheme in July.

Angela Sdrinis, of Angela Sdrinis Legal, who was one of the first legal practices to represent historical child sexual abuse clients said her firm and many legal practices had experienced a significant increase in claims.

“We have noticed an increase, and frankly we are all surprised,” she said. “We didn’t really expect it, given the Royal Commission ran for five years … I mean where have these people been?”

“We do know that one of the significant obstacles to coming forward for survivors is the guilt and shame they feel, so perhaps it has taken all of this for these people to finally feel they can.”

“Perhaps with the apology at that level and the establishment of a national redress scheme, they finally feel as if they have permission to come forward.”

Ms Sdrinis said her firm was receiving about 20 new clients a month and the civil law claims were producing results, with the “most common range for civil historical abuse settlements between $200,000 and $500,000.”

The Women Who Took Down Larry Nassar on Life After the Ruling

UNITED STATES
Glamour

November 11, 2018

At the 2018 Women of the Year Summit, a group of women who helped take down former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar—accused of years of sexual abuse—came together on stage to discuss the extensive challenges they faced, before the trial and after his sentencing. As Glamour executive editor Wendy Naugle, who moderated the conversation, said in her introduction, "They've changed the way we talk about sexual assault and abuse in this country."

Rachael Denhollander, the first woman to publicly accuse Nassar of assault, joined Andrea Munford, the detective who led the investigation, and Angela Povilaitis, the assistant Attorney General who led the prosecution. These women reflect but a fraction of the army that came together to bring justice against Nassar: More than 140 people came forward to file civil lawsuits against the disgraced doctor, including Olympic gymnast Aly Raisman, alleging sexual abuse under the guise of treatment for injuries. Judge Rosemarie Aquilina, who presided over the case, came up after Denhollander, Munford, and Povilaitis left the stage. (Because Nassar has asked permission to repeal his sentencing, Judge Aquilina cannot speak to Denhollander, Munford, or the survivors, hence why they appeared separately.)

After hearing over 150 statements ranging two decades, Judge Aquilina sentenced Nassar to up to 175 years in prison. The response to the ruling was instantly huge, which surprised her at the time: "After it was over, I took a break and went and did four probation violations. I had no idea that the world was exploding," the judge told Glamour in her WOTY profile. "I just did what I always do."

In the panel titled The Collective Power of the Sister Army, Denhollander, Munford, and Povilaitis discussed how they banded together, prepared for a historic trial, and support survivors of sexual abuse. Then, Judge Aquilina spoke about why she allowed survivors to speak out in the courtroom. Below, the biggest moments of the panel.

The CA Attorney General potential investigation is picking up steam

UNITED STATES
The Worthy Adversary

November 7, 2018

By Joelle Casteix

While there has been no formal announcement of an investigation into clergy sex abuse and cover-up statewide, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra sent this shot across the Twitter bow earlier today:

Spokane bishop on Catholic Church abuse crisis: ‘How much more can the people of God put up with?’

SPOKANE (WA)
The Spokesman- Review

November 11, 2018

By Chad Sokol

Light streamed into Bishop Thomas Daly’s office one recent afternoon as he spoke, in sometimes blunt terms, about the widening scandal of sexual abuse by Catholic clergy in the United States.

“It’s a moral crisis,” Daly said. “We have degenerate behavior, hypocrisy and now cover-up. My thought is, ‘How much more can the people of God put up with?’ ”

As the leader of the Spokane diocese since 2015, Daly has the final say on some investigations into abuse by clergy. He talked to The Spokesman-Review in late October following a wave of headlines about sexual abuse in all ranks of the Roman Catholic Church.

It began anew in June, when allegations emerged that Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, the former archbishop of Washington, D.C., had sexually abused minors and adult seminarians over the course of decades. Pope Francis accepted McCarrick’s resignation in July. And then in August, the Pennsylvania attorney general’s office released a grand jury report finding that church leaders had covered up the abuse of more than 1,000 people over a 70-year period, prompting investigations in several other states.

Survivors group wants independent investigation into Catholic clergy abuse in Tennessee

KNOXVILLE (TN)
Knoxville News Sentinel

November 9, 2018

By Amy McRary

Tennessee or federal authorities should investigate allegations of Catholic "pedophile priests" in the state, a leader of a survivors organization said Friday.

Susan Vance, a former nun with Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), also called on Catholic authorities to support abolishing statutes of limitations on child sex abuse crimes.

Vance held a short news conference Friday in drizzling rain on the sidewalk outside the Roman Catholic Diocese of Knoxville offices on Northshore Drive. A similar news conference was held an hour later in Nashville.

"We would ask the state attorney general to impanel a grand jury or the district attorneys to ask the State Bureau of Investigation to investigate the church files," Vance said. "An independent investigation is needed, whatever that may be."

Some thoughts on this week’s Baltimore Bishops’ Meeting

UNITED STATES
The Worthy Adversary

November 11, 2018

By Joelle Casteix

Spoiler warning: The US Conference of Catholic Bishops is taking us for a bunch of rubes.

The bishops are relying upon two things: 1) the public’s lack of institutional memory; and 2) Catholics’ reliance upon the bishop’s artificial moral authority.

#1 Lack of Institutional Memory

Let’s start with #1. The best way to do this is to compare compare scandals: 2002 and 2018.

The 2002 Catholic clergy sex abuse and cover-up scandal was prompted by the Boston Globe Spotlight exposé and subsequent cover-up scandals nationwide. The 2018 meeting is prompted by the Pennsylvania AG report and subsequent AG investigation announcements across the country.

The bishops are in crisis, pure and simple.

Your average 30-year-old reporter was fourteen in 2002. And unless they had a family member who was abused, chances are that the story was nowhere near their radar screen. This is all new to them.

So let’s compare stories.

Three former Catholic clergy who served in Cobb face sexual abuse allegations

MARIETTA (GA)
Marietta Daily Journal

November 7, 2018

By Jon Gargis

Three clergy members who served in Catholic churches in Cobb County in years past have been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse of a minor, according to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta.

The three were among 15 priests, deacons, seminarians and other religious staff named Tuesday in a release by the diocese who are accused of sexual abuse within the archdiocese or elsewhere “in a spirit of transparency and the hope of continued healing for the survivors of abuse,” Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory wrote in a statement accompanying the list.

Tuesday’s release did not go into specific allegations against any of the named clergy, such as the number of incidents alleged, where they occurred or when, but says that the list covers the period from the establishment of the Diocese of Atlanta in 1956 — it became an archdiocese six years later — to the present.

Among the seven named priests was John Douglas Edwards, whose last listed place of service was St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Kennesaw from 1987 to 1989. Edwards also served in 13 other churches following his 1961 ordination, according to the archdiocese, which lists his year of death as 1997.

Parishioners Gather to Support Bronx Bishop Accused of Sexual Abuse

NEW YORK (NY)
The New York Times

November 11, 2018

By Emily Palmer

On Friday evening, inside Our Lady of Refuge church in the Bronx, a man tapped on his phone and then raised it high, so each of the approximately 250 people in attendance could see the screen.

Rushing toward the man with the phone, the crowd shouted out the name of John Jenik, an auxiliary bishop who was barred from the church on Oct. 29, following a recent allegation that he had an inappropriate relationship with a teenage boy in the 1980s.

Bishop Jenik has denied the accusation, but after an investigation by the Archdiocese of New York, Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan called the allegation “credible and substantiated.” An independent commission affiliated with the archdiocese is considering the claim for a cash settlement, and the case has moved to the Vatican for a review process that could take years.

Since his banishment, Bishop Jenik, 74, has been living at a rehabilitation center without access to his parish.

U.S. bishops delay action on sex abuse at Vatican request

WASHINGTON (DC)
Think Progress

November 12, 2018

By Joshua Eaton

The Vatican has delayed a vote by U.S. Catholic bishops this week that would have held church leaders accountable for clergy sex abuse.

At a meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, on Monday, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, told the heads of all 196 U.S. dioceses and archdioceses that Pope Francis wanted them to hold off on a vote until after a meeting of worldwide church leaders in Rome in February.

The bishops had planned to vote Wednesday on a code of conduct for bishops and a lay commission to investigate violations.

“At the insistence of the Holy See, we will not be voting on the two action items,” DiNardo, who is archbishop of Galveston-Houston, in Texas, told his fellow bishops, according to The Washington Post.

Advocates for survivors of clergy sexual abuse, who have long accused the church of being unwilling to hold senior leaders accountable, were quick to criticize the move.

“We’re dealing with the crisis, right here, right now,” Becky Ianni, D.C. regional head of the victims’ group SNAP, told The Washington Post. “Yes, it’s a global problem, and they need to discuss it there [in Rome], but the U.S. needs to come up with something right now.”

Parents object to possible release of accused priest

PIEDMONT (SD)
Associated Press

November 12, 2018

Some parents in Piedmont are objecting to the possible release of a Rapid City priest accused of sexually abusing a 13-year-old child.

A defense attorney for John Praveen has asked a judge to release the defendant to the supervision of Catholic diocese at Casa Maria, a property in Piedmont for retired priests.

KOTA-TV reports parents of children who attend Stagebarn Middle School and two day care centers across from Casa Maria say church officials are overlooking the location in the release plan.

Prosecutors last week objected to the release and asked the judge to continue John Praveen’s $100,000 bond. Seventh Circuit Judge Robert Mandel did not immediately rule on the defense request.

Clergy Sex Abuse Crisis Tops Agenda as US Catholic Bishops Convene

BALTIMORE (MD)
Associated Press

November 12, 2018

By David Crary

As U.S. Catholic bishops gather for their national assembly this week, the clergy sex abuse crisis dominates their agenda amid calls from critics that church leaders finally bring about meaningful reforms to root out misbehaving priests.

The three-day assembly that starts Monday in Baltimore comes after a series of abuse scandals this year that have been stunning in their magnitude and number.

Bishops have several reforms under consideration to craft a stronger response to the scandals, but some Catholic activists are demanding further steps, including releasing the names of all clergy accused of abuse and giving a greater voice to abuse victims. One coalition of concerned Catholics, the 5 Theses movement, planned to post its proposals for reform on church doors in Baltimore and elsewhere on Sunday.

The abuse crisis is foremost among several challenges confronting Catholic leaders, who face conflicting pressures on the role of women and LGBT people in the church. And even though the Catholic population in the U.S. has been growing, most Catholics attend Mass rarely, and the number of active priests and nuns continues to decline.

Setting the tone for the national assembly, the president of the bishops' conference, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, asked his fellow bishops to spend the preceding seven days in "intensified" prayer, fasting and reparation.

The bishops will consider new steps to police their own ranks during abuse cases, and will likely approve an investigation by lay law enforcement experts of the handling of the scandal surrounding the former cardinal in Washington, D.C.

"Bishops are under intense scrutiny and pressure to deliver on both of these items," said the Rev. Thomas Berg, admissions director at St. Joseph's Seminary in Yonkers, New York.

UK inquiry: Monks hid sex abuse to protect church reputation

LONDON (UK)
Glenwood Guardian

November 11, 2018

A British inquiry concluded on Thursday that sexual abuse at two leading Roman Catholic schools in Britain was considerably higher than is reflected by conviction figures, with monks hiding allegations to protect the church‘s reputation.

The Independent Inquiry into issued a scathing report saying that monks at Ampleforth in North Yorkshire and Downside in Somerset hid allegations of “appalling sexual abuse” against pupils as young as 7. Ten people linked to the schools have been cautioned over or convicted of sexual activity or pornography offenses involving a “large number of children.”

“The true scale of the abuse however is likely to be considerably higher,” said Professor Alexis Jay, the inquiry chair.

Ampleforth accepted responsibility for past failures and thanked Jay for her work.

What's left of bishops' moral authority is on the line this week

BALTIMORE (MD)
National Catholic Reporter

November 12, 2018

By Michael Sean Winters

Greetings from Baltimore! This morning, we are waiting for the address by the papal nuncio, Archbishop Christophe Pierre, as well as the presidential address of Cardinal Daniel DiNardo. After that, the bishops will be engaged in spiritual discernment for the rest of the day.

One of the main issues the bishops will be discerning is how to respond to the clergy sex abuse mess, which requires diagnosing how they got to this point. While there is general agreement on many aspects of what caused the crisis, there are two meta-narratives about causation that are not complementary. Some argue that the core problem is the spread of homosexuality among the clergy, which has been made possible because of lousy moral theology and weak episcopal leadership.

Proponents of this meta-narrative ignore both expert and common opinion. The 2011 John Jay study indicated homosexuality is not a risk factor. Common sense would tell you that priests had access to the boys' room and not the girls' room and that in many of the years surveyed, there were not yet even altar girls. Interestingly, if you consult the news articles published at the time the John Jay study was published in 2011 (for example, this article by Carol Zimmerman published by the bishops' own news service, CNS), even conservative bishops like Archbishops Robert Carlson, Timothy Dolan and Allen Vigneron affirmed the findings and did not question them. The people complaining about the report were SNAP and other victims' advocacy groups, and their complaint was not that the report let gays off the hook.

COLUMN: Stop blaming victims; hold sexual perpetrators accountable

MEADVILLE (PA)
Meadville Tribune

November 12, 2018

By Bruce Harlan

We live in tough times. Whether you’re watching TV, reading the newspaper or looking at your smart phone, the news is all around us and it’s usually the same thing: more examples of mass shootings and acts of terrorism, more reports of destructive weather, more divisive stories involving politics and more allegations of sexual violence.

In the last 12 months, consider all of the stories about sexual violence making headlines: Bill Cosby’s trial and conviction for three counts of sexual assault; Dr. Larry Nassar’s guilty plea for abusing hundreds of young women who attended sports camps at Michigan State University; the Pennsylvania grand jury’s report on six Catholic dioceses where more than 300 members of the clergy were named in connection to sex crimes against children; and, of course, the #MeToo movement that spread virally on social media to help demonstrate the widespread prevalence of sexual assault and harassment.


Only finalized at yesterday, full agenda for 3 public days of USCCB Plenary

BALTIMORE (MD)
US Conference of Catholic Bishops

November 12, 2018

http://bit.ly/2PkNdKY

Meeting to open 9am ET Monday with “Presidential Statement on the Crisis” from Cardinal DiNardo, followed by the usual Presidential Address, then Nuncio.

Catholics paid $200,000 to upgrade Bishop Malone's new home — and he wants it mostly to himself

BUFFALO (NY)
WKBW

November 12, 2018

By Charlie Specht

Those payouts will likely cost the diocese millions, and the bishop has since moved to a former convent at St. Stanislaus Church on Buffalo’s East Side.

But internal documents obtained by the 7 Eyewitness News I-Team show parishioners are already footing the bill for costly renovations to the bishop’s new home on Buffalo’s East Side, leading some to question how much of a sacrifice it will really be for the shepherd of Buffalo’s Catholics -- and whether he actually plans to live among his flock.

“He’s moving from a very large home to an even larger home that’s being set up to his specific tastes,” said Siobhan O’Connor, the bishop’s former secretary.

November 11, 2018

Some thoughts on this week’s Baltimore Bishops’ Meeting

UNITED STATES
The Worthy Adversary (blog)

November 11, 2018

By Joelle Casteix

Spoiler warning: The US Conference of Catholic Bishops is taking us for a bunch of rubes.

The bishops are relying upon two things: 1) the public’s lack of institutional memory; and 2) Catholics’ reliance upon the bishop’s artificial moral authority.

#1 Lack of Institutional Memory

Let’s start with #1. The best way to do this is to compare compare scandals: 2002 and 2018.

The 2002 Catholic clergy sex abuse and cover-up scandal was prompted by the Boston Globe Spotlight exposé and subsequent cover-up scandals nationwide. The 2018 meeting is prompted by the Pennsylvania AG report and subsequent AG investigation announcements across the country.

The bishops are in crisis, pure and simple.

A Letter from Cardinal Seán O’Malley and the Bishops of the Archdiocese of Boston

BOSTON (MA)
Archdiocese of Boston

November 10-11, 2018

My Dear Friends,

The annual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), which takes place from November 12-15 in Baltimore, will be of particularly great importance. The revelations of this past summer concerning Archbishop McCarrick and the Pennsylvania Grand Jury report make clear that the Catholic Church in the United States, at every level, must do all that is possible to prevent the abuse of children, young people and vulnerable adults in the Church and work to restore the trust lost through this scandal.

Since arriving in Boston in 2003, addressing the sexual abuse crisis has been my highest
priority. Our policies and programs seek to guarantee victim/survivors the means to report
claims of abuse and seek settlement, programs to provide professional care and support, and
our full cooperation with law enforcement in the Commonwealth. In June of 2002 the USCCB
embraced the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, which commits all
archdioceses to reporting any allegations of abuse of a minor to civil authorities, zero tolerance for the exercise of ministry by any member of the clergy against whom there is a credible allegation of abuse of a minor, and screenings and trainings for all Church personnel, clergy, lay employees and volunteers, who could have any ministry with a child or young person. Where the Charter has been enforced there have been dramatic improvements in safeguarding. Any bishop or religious superior who does not comply with the Charter should be removed.

Sex abuse crisis at highest levels of U.S. Catholic church to dominate agenda at bishops' meeting in Baltimore

BALTIMORE (MD)
The Baltimore Sun

November 12, 2018

By Jonathan M. Pitts

The nation’s Catholic bishops will gather in Baltimore this week against the backdrop of a sexual-abuse crisis that has reached the highest levels of the church in the United States.

After a year in which a Pennsylvania grand jury report revealed that hundreds of “predator priests” molested more than 1,000 children over seven decades and a U.S. cardinal resigned over sexual abuse allegations, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops is expected to set aside much of its traditionally staid policy-making agenda to address the scandal during three days of meetings that start Monday.

“This is going to be a very important meeting in terms of how they respond to the crisis and whether their response is going to be adequate to deal with the tremendous concerns everyone has,” said the Rev. Thomas J. Reese, a Jesuit priest and longtime religion writer.

The annual gathering, set to run through Wednesday at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront, will mark the first time the organization has met as a body since the latest round of sex abuse scandals broke.

The bishops — a group of about 300 clerics who head Catholic dioceses across the nation — traditionally use the Baltimore assembly to map out a broad direction for the American church over the coming year.

Child Victims Act top priority for new state Senate majority

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

November 8, 2018

By Jay Tokasz

A new Democratic majority in the state Senate means childhood victims of sex abuse might soon be able to sue the Catholic Church in clergy molestation cases that date back decades.

Senate Democrats said Wednesday that passing the Child Victims Act will be a top priority when they assume control in 2019. Democrats on Tuesday won at least 37 seats in the Senate, winning control of the 63-seat chamber for the first time in a decade.

“We’re looking forward to finally getting it passed with this new Democratic majority,” said Sen. Timothy M. Kennedy, D-Buffalo. “We have been calling for passage of the Child Victims Act for years. It has languished under the Republican majority. It is one of several initiatives we’re looking to fast-track.”

New York is among the most restrictive states in the nation when it comes to allowing victims of sexual abuse from years ago to file lawsuits against their alleged perpetrators.

La Iglesia se resiste a revisar su pasado

[The Spanish Church is reluctant to review its past]

MADRID, SPAIN
El País

November 11, 2018

By José Manuel Romero and Julio Núñez

La cúpula eclesiástica rechaza clarificar los abusos como ha hecho Alemania y anuncia Francia. Los jesuitas aseguran que investigarán sus casos de las últimas décadas

La Iglesia en España se resiste a revisar los casos de abusos sexuales del pasado. A diferencia de lo que está ocurriendo en otros países, como Alemania o Francia, la cúpula de la Iglesia española no ha encargado ni ha elaborado ningún informe ni creado ninguna comisión para investigar los abusos sexuales de sacerdotes a menores en las últimas décadas. El papa Francisco ha convocado en febrero a las conferencias episcopales de todo el mundo para tratar el caso de los abusos sexuales a menores en la Iglesia.

The USCCB Agenda and How to Improve It

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

November 10, 2018

On Monday, Bishops from across the country will gather at their headquarters in Baltimore to discuss, among other things, the current state of the clergy sex abuse crisis. Yesterday, a detailed piece from J.D. Flynn in the National Catholic Register has pointed out some significant issues with the proposed agenda.

As Cardinal DiNardo and his fellow bishops come together to discuss a path forward, special attention will be paid to the issue of accountability for bishops who conceal sex crimes. According to the Register, the bishops plan to discuss a proposed Code of Conduct as well as changes to their internal reporting and investigative commissions.

Regarding the former, it is difficult to understand why the simple moral imperative of “do not sexually harass or abuse other adults or children” must be codified to be understood. Similarly, it is impossible to believe that adding such language to a code of conduct will result in real change. Bishops are intelligent men with massive power and influence. It stands to reason that the vast majority of these men already know that sexual abuse is wrong, but history shows that they also prefer to protect the reputations of their institution and themselves, first. It is also critical to point out that breaking the code of conduct may have consequences that sound good on paper but are unlikely to be enforceable. If the Vatican has so far failed to properly adjudicate any bishop who has concealed sex crimes, such Cardinal Bernard Law, then how are we to expect that a new code of conduct would make a difference? The answer is we cannot.

Turning points on abuse crisis loom in US, Italy

DENVER (CO)
Crux

November 11, 2018

By John L. Allen Jr.

Two potential turning points loom this week in the Catholic Church’s fight against clerical sexual abuse, one in the “gets it” part of the world and another in the “jury’s still out” zone.

One should come from the fall meeting of the U.S. bishops in Baltimore opening Monday, and the other with the release of a long-awaited new set of anti-abuse guidelines from the powerful Episcopal Conference of Italy, known by its Italian acronym CEI.

In the U.S., the bishops are expected to vote to amend norms adopted at the 2002 meeting in Dallas to place bishops under the same protocols as other clergy when it comes to the “zero tolerance” standard, meaning automatic removal from ministry after a credible charge of abuse.

Though the bishops have already announced their intention to do that in some form, they’ll need to work out exactly how. Under canon law the only superior of a bishop is the pope, not the bishops’ conference, so they’ll have to decide if they want to appeal to Rome to amend their norms, voluntarily submit themselves to a lay review group, or some other mechanism.

The bishops are also expected to take up the thornier matter of how to get to the bottom of the scandals surrounding ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, including who facilitated his rise up the ladder despite concerns over sexual misconduct stretching back at least to the 1990s.

El contraataque de la “Cofradía”

[The counterattack of the "Brotherhood:" two priests resume their parish duties]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 10, 2018

By Leyla Zapata

Dos sacerdotes sobreseídos por la justicia retomaron sus funciones en las parroquias de La Compañía y Pumanque. La Defensoría Penal Pública solicitará la misma acción en favor de otros dos presbíteros imputados.

“Bien, bien, gracias, pero no doy entrevistas!”. Eso fue lo único que dijo el sacerdote Aquiles Correa, antes de cerrar la puerta de la sala en la que lo esperaban los feligreses de La Compañía, en la Región de O’Higgins, para iniciar la reunión de coordinación pastoral.

Catholic Diocese of Shreveport issues statement on sexual abuse of juveniles

SHREVEPORT (LA)
ArkLaTex.com

November 10, 2018

By Nancy Cook

In a statement issued Friday, the Very Rev. Peter Mangum, administrator of the Catholic Diocese of Shreveport, said no allegation of sexual abuse of a minor by a clergy member has been received since the diocese was formed in 1986.

In the statement, Mangum stressed that is consistent with the findings of many dioceses, as most of the accusations nationwide are from incidents that occurred decades ago.

That's not to say there weren’t area priests accused of sexual misconduct, only that if there were, the accusations came prior to Shreveport becoming a stand-alone diocese.

Prior to 1986, Shreveport and Monroe were part of the Alexandria-Shreveport Catholic Diocese, meaning any local allegations would have been submitted to the bishop in Alexandria.

After the diocese split, many of the priests serving in churches that became part of the Shreveport Diocese became a part of the new diocese.

More work needed in healing process

ASHTABULA (OH)
Ashtabula Star Beacon

November 11, 2018

Years into the sexual abuse scandal that has rocked the Catholic Church, we still see signs that some in the Church’s institutional leadership still don’t get it.

Earlier this month, Bishop George V. Murry of the Youngstown Catholic Diocese released a list of about two dozen priests who have been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse of a minor in the Youngstown Diocese. Of those, almost one third spent time in Ashtabula County. But that fact was not known until several days after the names were released, which is an unfortunate microcosm for how the Church as an organization has handled the entire scandal.

Murry seems a genuine, sincere leader. Multiple times during the news conference on the subject he talked about how angry and embarrassed he was this issue had not been resolved. He had harsh words for some of his fellow bishops, saying any who helped in the cover up should be removed and calling out those who still fail to understand the damage sexual assault does to children.

But Church lawyers did him no favors with how they advised Murry and the diocese to handle the release of the names. The news conference took place on a Tuesday and only after a barrage of media members, including the Star Beacon, requested the priest’s assignments did Murry overrule the Church lawyers — who had told Murry to release only the names, whether they were alive or dead and whether they were alive or dead at the time accusations were made against them — and promise to release a full career background for each priest.

Aumentan en 15 los casos de abuso sexual por parte de miembros de la Iglesia: Víctimas suman 245

[Church of Chile: 15 new cases of clergy sexual abuse, victims total 245]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 11, 2018

Este lunes comienza una asamblea plenaria de la Conferencia Episcopal de Chile (CECh) que reunirá a sus obispos para analizar las políticas de reparación y prevención que anunciaron hace dos meses ante la oleada de escándalos en los que está inmersa la Iglesia católica del país.

Las causas abiertas por abusos sexuales en el seno de la Iglesia de Chile alcanzan ya las 139, que implican a 245 víctimas y 190 personas son investigadas, según informaron hoy a Efe fuentes fiscales.

Clarification on accused priest given

YOUNGSTOWN (OH)
Youngstown Tribune

November 11, 2018

On Saturday, Diocese of Youngstown Bishop George V. Murry clarified a name on the list of 31 clergy removed from ministry because of a credible allegation of sexual abuse of a minor.

Named on the list was John F. Warner. There are two persons named John F. Warner who served as priests in the Diocese of Youngstown. The John F. (Jack) Warner listed is not the John F. Warner of Louisville, Ohio, who was ordained in 1972 and resigned from ministry in 1978 after service in Kent and at Walsh University.

The John F. Warner mentioned in the list was ordained in 1970 and was from Girard. John F. Warner of Louisville is in complete compliance with the Child Protection Policy of the Diocese of Youngstown.

From defrocking to lawsuits: Allegations against priests can take many turns

STATEN ISLAND (NY)
Staten Island Advance

November 11, 2018

By Maura Grunlund

Sex allegations against a priest are complicated matters that can take several turns.

In some cases, criminal charges are filed. In others, punishments are decided by the church and not prosecutors.

Some priests have admitted guilt. Others have put up fierce legal fights to clear their name.

Some have resulted in settlements. Others have resulted in lawsuits filed against the church or even the accuser.

At least 15 priests with ties to Staten Island have been the subject of sex or pornography-related accusations over the years.

This slideshow highlights some of those cases and their outcomes.

Monsignor Charles Coen is one of four monsignors and a priest "who had an allegation of sexual abuse of minors brought against them in the Archdiocese's Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program," according to Catholic New York, the official newspaper of the Archdiocese of New York.

A native of Dublin, Ireland, Coen was assigned to St. Joseph-St. Thomas R.C. Parish in Pleasant Plains for about 10 years beginning in 1975. Previously, he served at St. Paul's R.C. Church in New Brighton, according to Advance records.

Coen taught and conducted Irish music for children during his time on the Island, according to Advance records.

Las razones de Ezzati para no declarar en la fiscalía

[Ezzati explains why he did not to testify in cover-up investigation]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 10, 2018

By Javiera Matus

El arzobispo de Santiago, tras una misa en Recoleta, dijo que espera acceder al expediente del caso.

Con una misa a cargo del arzobispo de Santiago, Ricardo Ezzati, y el sacerdote Nicolás Vial, presidente de la Fundación Paternitas, se celebró hoy la reapertura de la emblemática iglesia La Viñita, ubicada en Recoleta, tras su séptimo proceso de reparación. Sus obras de restauración comenzaron en 2017.

When work and faith collide for an editor

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Times-Picayune

November 11, 2018

By Mark Lorando

As I write this I am preparing to make one last run through my inbox before making the hourlong drive to Convent, La., where I will park my car, turn off my laptop and cellphone, and attempt to leave the world – and the newsroom – behind.

It’s my annual four-day silent retreat at Manresa, the Jesuit retreat center surrounded by 130 acres of majestic, moss-draped oaks on River Road in St. James Parish. I began making this trek in the fall of 2003 and have more or less scheduled my life around it every November since. Given the high-stress, round-the-clock nature of the news business, my mental, physical and spiritual health pretty much depend on it.

The goal is always to set thoughts of work aside for a few days and re-center body and soul through reflection and prayer. Some years, that’s easier said than done. And it will be particularly difficult this year given the timing of the retreat, one week after the Archdiocese of New Orleans released the names of 55 priests and two deacons it said had been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse of minors dating as far back as the 1910s.

O'burg Diocese To Release Priest Names In Sex Abuse Scandal

CARTHAGE (NY)
WWNY TV

November 10, 2018

The Catholic Diocese of Ogdensburg has decided to release the names of the remaining priests implicated in the long-running sex abuse scandal by members of the Catholic clergy.

In a letter distributed at weekend masses, Bishop Terry LaValley writes "While there are strong arguments for releasing the names and strong arguments for not releasing the names, recent controversies in the Church make it necessary for us to now release the names.

"The recent controversies and scandals have produced righteous anger, discouragement and frustration among the people of God. Increasingly, the faithful have called for the release of the names of those removed from ministry..."

The names will be posted to the Diocese web site, LaValley notes. No names were posted as of early Saturday evening. A report from the diocese in October disclosed that the diocese - which is the Catholic Church in northern New York - has paid out nearly $5.5 million to 37 victims of clergy sex abuse.

Although the names of several priests in the Diocese of Ogdensburg implicated in sex abuse have surfaced over the years, there have always been more names that have not been made public, despite pleas from some victims. It's not known how many more names there are, but church officials have said no new cases of abuse have surfaced in the last 20 years.

in his letter, Bishop LaValley notes "I know the release of names will cause pain for those on the list, their families, former parishioners and friends. There will be a need for compassion and understanding among all of us. While our main concern is the safety of our your people and helping victims find healing and peace, we must also strive to uphold the dignity of those removed from ministry."

A case revisited: 3 women vs. Erie diocese

ERIE (PA)
GoErie.com

November 11, 2018

By Ed Palattella

Former bishops challenged women’s accounts that they spoke up about a priest and child pornography. Grand jury report supports the women, though wounds run deep.

The grand jury report on the Roman Catholic Church in Pennsylvania, including the Catholic Diocese of Erie, has vindicated victims of child sexual abuse.

The report has also supported three women who once had strong connections to the church.

The women are not abuse victims.

They were, according to the grand jury report, whistleblowers in the Erie diocese.

As the 884-page report, released in August, continues to reverberate — it prompted a response from Pope Francis and calls for changes in state legislation — the experience of the three women offers another example of the report’s wide-reaching effects.

For the victims, the report provides proof that their complaints of abuse by clergy, though unheeded for years, were valid.

“We have heard them,” the grand jurors, in their report, said of the victims.

For the three women — Sally Beres, Ann Caro and Helen Rusnak— the report provides more public affirmation that, nearly 40 years ago, they acted appropriately when they expressed concerns about a priest.

The three said they alerted the Catholic Diocese of Erie to child pornography and other pornography found in the early 1980s in the office of the Rev. Robert F. Bower, of Edinboro — only to have the diocese reject their concerns and later publicly dispute that they had even raised them.

The ramifications were lasting. Beres said she lost her job as a church secretary, and she and Caro and Rusnak said they were ostracized for speaking up about Bower. All three said they remain estranged from the church they embraced for much of their lives.

“I lost my religion,” Beres, 70, said in a recent interview.

The Pennsylvania Senate continues to fail child sexual abuse victims

LANCASTER (PA)
Lancaster OnLine

November 11, 2018

Associated Press

As we noted last month, the Pennsylvania Senate so far has failed to act on Senate Bill 261, which would eliminate the criminal statute of limitations for child sexual abuse, and give future victims until age 50 to press civil claims. The House approved a version of Senate Bill 261 in September that included an amendment from Democratic state Rep. Mark Rozzi, which would provide a two-year retroactive window during which victims of past child sexual abuse could seek justice in civil court. But senators, led by Republican Senate Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati, balked at passing the bill with that amendment.

The state Senate has just one more scheduled session day this year, and that’s Wednesday.

The final session day generally is reserved for unofficial matters, but Republican state Sen. Ryan Aument, of Landisville, has said he sees no reason why a vote on Senate Bill 261 couldn’t be taken on that day.

And either chamber of the General Assembly can meet before midnight Nov. 30, when the two-year legislative session formally ends.en to voices of reason. They seem utterly lacking in compassion — and any sense of shame.

Catholic church's sex abuse crisis requires a shift in power

JERSEY CITY (NJ)
Jersey Journal

November 11, 2018

By Rev. Alexander Santora

This week, the Catholic bishops of the U.S. will gather in Baltimore for their first semi-annual conference since the summer of sexual abuse allegations, including former Newark Archbishop Theodore McCarrick.

How I wish I could be a fly on the wall of their closed sessions as they will, according to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, "discuss and vote on a series of concrete measures to respond to the abuse crisis, including ... a third-party reporting mechanism, standards of conduct for bishops, and protocols for bishops resigned or removed because of abuse."

I am too limiting. It should be more than flies allowed into that room if they are truly to engage and enlighten the laity of the church, the major stakeholder in its future.

November 10, 2018

I-Team exclusive: Archbishop Lori addresses church sex abuse scandal

BALTIMORE (MD)
WBAL-TV

November 9, 2018

'We have to be held to the same high standard,' Archbishop William Lori says

By Barry Simms

Catholic bishops will gather in Baltimore next week for their annual meeting, and because of the sex abuse scandal involving priests and bishops, some consider this an intense moment in crisis for the church.

Baltimore Archbishop William Lori spoke exclusively Friday with the 11 News I-Team on reform efforts and renewing trust. Lori said he and other bishops are deeply horrified by the sex abuse scandal that has plagued the Catholic Church and hurt children and adults.

"I can tell you this resonates very deeply in my mind and heart," Lori said.

The archbishop said there is a sickness involved on the part of the people who commit abuse, calling it a crime and also a moral crime.

Much attention has been focused on handling priests accused of wrongdoing following the release of an attorney general's report in Pennsylvania and former Washington Archbishop Theodore McCarrick's decision to step down because of sexual allegations against him.

"If any bishop has harmed a minor or harassed an adult, that bishop should resign," Lori said. "We have to be held to the same high standard we hold our priests and lay employees and volunteers to. We should have the same standards and the same consequence."

Louisville lawmaker pushes for investigation into Catholic church sex abuse allegations

LOUISVILLE (KY)
WLKY-TV

November 9, 2018

By Kevin Trager

A state lawmaker is working with the local archdiocese to promote transparency regarding priests accused of child sex abuse.

Rep. Jim Wayne is sponsoring legislation that would make it easier for the attorney general to investigate sex abuse allegations against priests statewide.

Wayne is a lifelong Catholic who is retiring in January. He is encouraging Louisville Archbishop Joseph Kurtz to endorse the proposed law and future investigation.

U.S. bishops will debate enforcing a code of conduct, in response to sexual abuse scandals

WASHINGTON D.C.
Washington Post

November 9, 2018

By Julie Zauzmer

After months of outcry from American Catholics this year, demanding that bishops — the highest-ranking Catholic leaders in the United States — be held accountable for decades of child abuse by priests, the bishops will meet in person for the first time for a days-long reckoning about how to address the crisis.

In a highly unusual move, the bishops will put aside almost everything else on their agenda for the annual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops next week to focus solely on rectifying their policies on abuse. The leaders of all 196 U.S. archdioceses and dioceses are invited to attend the Baltimore event.

Many bishops and lay leaders hope they will emerge from the meeting with sweeping new procedures in place, including a lay commission empowered to investigate abuse by bishops, a new code of conduct and a plan for bishops removed from office because of their handling of abuse.

“When we come out of the meeting and are able to communicate what will be different moving forward, it’s my hope that all those who’ve been asking for such concrete steps will recognize: The bishops heard us,” said Bishop Michael Burbidge, who leads Virginia’s Diocese of Arlington. “We hear what you said. And we share those concerns. And we’re doing something about it.”

Alleged clergy sex abuse and coverup at a prominent D.C. parish puts spotlight on Catholic religious orders

WASHINGTON D.C.
Washington Post

November 9, 2018

By Samantha Schmidt , Marisa Iati and Michelle Boorstein

An alleged clergy sex-abuse coverup case unfolding this week at one of the Washington region’s most prominent Latino parishes is putting a spotlight on a segment of the Catholic Church seen as uniquely opaque when it comes to misconduct: religious orders.

Three parish leaders at the Shrine of the Sacred Heart, a bustling, heavily Salvadoran church in Columbia Heights, were removed this week following reports that three teenage girls were groped or kissed by the Rev. Urbano Vazquez, a gregarious and popular priest.

The arrest and child sex-abuse charge against Vazquez and removal of the lead priest and the chief child-protection coordinator have stunned Sacred Heart parishioners, with many circling the church protectively or taking a wait-and-see attitude toward the charges. Sacred Heart is large and central to the area’s Hispanic community, with many ministries — a school, English literacy classes and an immigration resource center, among other services.

Top Catholic bishop to be questioned over child abuse scandal

ENGLAND
The Guardian

November 11, 2018

By Harriet Sherwood

Cardinal Vincent Nichols will be first leader of English church to testify under oath

The Roman Catholic church in England will come under intense scrutiny this week over its handling of child sexual abuse and the cover-up of predatory priests by bishops and other senior figures.

Survivors of rape and assault will testify over five days at an independent inquiry into child sexual abuse, along with church leaders, officials and child protection experts in a case study examining the archdiocese of Birmingham.

Cardinal Vincent Nichols, the archbishop of Westminster, will give evidence in person on Tuesday – the first time that the most senior Catholic in England has been cross-examined under oath. He was archbishop of Birmingham from 2000 to 2009. Bernard Longley, the current archbishop of Birmingham, will also be cross-examined. All other earlier archbishops of the diocese have died.

El exreligioso de La Salle asume 130 años de prisión por abusar de menores

[Former La Salle priest sentenced to 130 years in prison for abusing minors]

MADRID, SPAIN
El País

November 5, 2018

By Aurora Intxausti

Pedro Ramos Lominchar pide perdón a sus víctimas por su actividad delictiva

Pedro Antonio Ramos Lominchar, exreligioso de La Salle y exprofesor del Colegio Maravillas de Madrid, ha asumido esta mañana la condena de 130 años de prisión al reconocer en el juicio, celebrado en la Audiencia Provincial de Madrid, que abusó de varios menores y de cuatro adultos cuando estaban dormidos, entre 2013 y 2016. El condenado, que en 2016 era coordinador de Educación Infantil y Primaria del citado colegio, pidió perdón a las víctimas, a sus familias, al centro escolar y a la congregación religiosa a la que pertenecía, una vez que asumió que había cometido los delitos de los que le acusaba la fiscalía.

Un “depredador sexual” expulsado de Miami abusó de menores durante años en Salamanca

["Sexual predator" priest expelled from Miami abused minors for years in Salamanca]

BARCELONA AND SALAMANCA, SPAIN
El País

November 9, 2018

By Oriol Güell and Íñigo Domínguez

El obispado ignoró el aviso de EE UU y destinó al sacerdote a una decena de pueblos de la provincia entre 1981 y 2004, donde EL PAÍS ha localizado a tres víctimas

El obispado de Salamanca ignoró un aviso de la archidiócesis de Miami, que expulsó en 1981 de su jurisdicción a Francisco Carreras tras un caso de abusos a un menor, y mantuvo a este sacerdote durante más de dos décadas, entre 1981 y 2004, al frente de una decena de parroquias rurales de la provincia. En sus nuevos destinos, Carreras dejó un reguero de nuevas agresiones sexuales, según han denunciado ahora tres víctimas a EL PAÍS.

El obispado de Salamanca ignoró durante décadas denuncias contra el cura apartado en 2014

[For decades, Bishop of Salamanca ignored accusations against priest condemned in 2014]

MADRID, SPAIN
El País

November 1, 2018

By Íñigo Domínguez

El obispo recibió acusaciones al menos desde los noventa sin tomar medidas porque no las consideró “verosímiles”. Todavía en 2011 alegó “la buena fama” del acusado para no actuar

El obispado de Salamanca ignoró durante décadas, sin informar a la policía, las denuncias contra un cura condenado finalmente en el Vaticano por abusos sexuales a menores en 2014, Isidro López Santos, de 77 años. La sentencia canónica solo llegó después de la denuncia en la diócesis de una de sus víctimas, Javier Paz, en 2011, y de que sacara su caso a la luz pública tres años más tarde. Le acusó de abusos entre 1982 y 1992. Después también se sumaron a la denuncia otras dos personas, aunque el obispado lo silenció y nunca mencionó en sus notas de prensa que había más de una víctima. Solo usó un plural genérico, por lo que el de Javier Paz parecía un caso aislado.

“Ahora la Iglesia es culpable de ocultar. ¿Y las víctimas, por qué se han callado?”

[Recordings of Salamanca Bishop reveal the arguments and tactics to silence abuse complaints]

MADRID, SPAIN
El País

November 8, 2018

By Íñigo Domínguez

Las grabaciones al obispo de Salamanca revelan los argumentos y las tácticas de la jerarquía eclesiástica para acallar a los denunciantes de abusos

Las conversaciones grabadas en 2013 entre el obispo de Salamanca, Carlos López, y una víctima de abusos Javier Paz, a las que ha tenido acceso EL PAÍS, son reveladoras de los argumentos de la Iglesia para silenciar el escándalo y de su falta de empatía con quienes denuncian. Uno de los momentos más llamativos de los audios es cuando el prelado responde a las quejas de su interlocutor sobre la actitud de la Iglesia. El obispo pregunta por otras víctimas que conoce Paz, para saber si se quieren unir a su denuncia contra Isidro López, el cura de Salamanca que fue finalmente condenado por el Vaticano en 2014.

“Me siento profundamente ofendido por el obispo de Salamanca”

[Clergy abuse victim: "I feel deeply offended by the Bishop of Salamanca"]

MADRID, SPAIN
El País

November 9, 2018

By Íñigo Domínguez

Una víctima del cura apartado en 2014 replica a los reproches del jefe de la diócesis a los abusados por tardar años en denunciar

Una de las víctimas de abusos de Isidro López Santos, el cura de Salamanca condenado por el Vaticano en 2014, ha salido al paso de las afirmaciones que el obispo de la ciudad, Carlos López, manifiesta en las grabaciones publicadas por EL PAÍS. En ellas, el responsable de la diócesis, reprochaba a las víctimas que la culpa de que los abusos quedaran impunes también era suya, por no haberlo denunciado antes. “Después de escuchar la grabación, me siento profundamente ofendido por el obispo. ¿Cómo pretenden que un chaval de 12 o 14 años, en los años noventa, que no se hablaba de estos temas o al menos yo, que solo pensaba en jugar con mis amigos, quiera que hubiéramos tomado medidas legales? ¡Si yo sólo quería jugar con mis amigos!”, lamenta.

Giménez Barriocanal: “El porcentaje [de pederastia en la Iglesia] es irrelevante”

[Spanish Church official says: "The percentage (of pedophilia in the Church) is irrelevant"]

MADRID, SPAIN
El País

November 10, 2018

By Maribel Marín Yarza and Carmen Morán Breña

El jefe de las finanzas de la Conferencia Episcopal Española lamenta que se ponga el foco solo en la Iglesia cuando se habla de abusos sexuales

Fernando Giménez Barriocanal (Madrid, 50 años), casado y con cinco hijos, es el jefe de finanzas de la Conferencia Episcopal Española y el único de la institución que ha accedido a ser entrevistado por EL PAÍS —tras numerosas peticiones— en un momento en el que la Iglesia española se encuentra en el centro de todas las miradas y no solo por la polémica exhumación de los restos del dictador Franco. En su austero despacho, bajo un retrato del papa Francisco y la atenta mirada de su jefe de prensa —que interviene para frenar preguntas sobre los abusos sexuales de algunos miembros del clero—, Barriocanal, también presidente de la cadena COPE, trata de ceñirse a un guion económico y de eludir los temas más espinosos con un “no sé”, “lo desconozco”. El porcentaje de pederastia en la Iglesia española, dice, “es irrelevante”.

Diácono queda con medidas cautelares por presunto abuso sexual a un menor en Linares

[Deacon accused of sexually abusing a minor in Linares]

CHILE
BioBioChile

November 9, 2018

By Ariela Muñoz

Este jueves, el Obispado de Linares acogió una denuncia sobre un presunto abuso sexual de un menor, ocurrida hace unos 25 años, en contra del diácono permanente Óscar Villagra. Ante esto, se inició una investigación que durará 60 días, según dicta el protocolo de la Conferencia Episcopal.

Ezzati defiende decisión de guardar silencio y asegura que declarará cuando la fiscalía tenga sus antecedentes

[Ezzati defends decision to remain silent and says he will testify when the prosecution has the correct records]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 10, 2018

By Angélica Vera

De acuerdo al arzobispo de Santiago, el pasado 3 de octubre optó por no hablar debido a que "los antecedentes que habían entregados no eran los míos, habían entregado los antecedentes de la diócesis de Rancagua".

En el marco de la reinauguración de la iglesia La Viñita en Recoleta, el arzobispo de Santiago Ricardo Ezzati se refirió al silencio que ha guardado cuando fue citado declarar como imputado por presunto encubrimiento de casos de abusos de parte de miembros de la Iglesia Católica, asegurando que cuando fue a la Fiscalía de Rancagua los antecedentes presentados no correspondían a los suyos.

Diocese outlines latest policy reactions to sexual abuse allegations

JEFFERSON CITY (MO)
Jefferson City Tribune

By Phillip Sitter

November 11, 2018

The Diocese of Jefferson City is demanding increased transparency from the religious communities operating within it, and would like increased accountability over clergy in its care who have been removed from ministry over credible allegations of sexual abuse or concern for children's safety.

The diocese's Bishop Shawn McKnight announced Thursday a list of 33 non-active clergy men and religious brothers who have worked in the diocese after its establishment in 1956, who one way or another have been removed from service and who more likely than not sexually abused children or were found not fit to work around children. The list includes 14 clergy men or religious brothers who are dead; 15 living who have been permanently removed from ministry; two more who have been essentially defrocked; another one who has been expelled from the diocese; and one who has been criminally convicted and imprisoned.

The full list of names of the credibly accused men and resources for victims will be included at or near the end of this story. McKnight did not know Thursday how many children or then-children had been victimized by the clergy who were named because many alleged perpetrators of abuse had multiple victims, and not all victims have come forward — though McKnight hoped they would with the publication of the names of the accused abusers.

McKnight, who read from a lengthy statement, said Thursday "In the past 12 days, I have participated in six listening sessions across our diocese regarding the sexual abuse crisis in our Church. Consistently, I heard the message: 'Get it all out and deal with it. Don't hold any more secrets. We heal better when we all know what the problem is.'"

McKnight said he is doing more.

"In addition, I have contacted the superiors of our religious communities of priest in inform them of my new policy, effective Jan. 1, 2020, that any religious community serving in the Diocese of Jefferson City must commit to the release of names of all their credibly accused members in order to continue serving in our diocese."

The Archdiocese of New Orleans clergy sex abuse list has been released but more must be done

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
WDSU TV

November 9, 2018

WDSU President and General Manager Joel Vilmenay issues an editorial after the release of the Archdiocese of New Orleans clergy sex abuse list.

U.S. Catholic Bishops Meet in the Shadow, Still, of Clergy Sex Abuse

NEW YORK (NY)
National Review

By Ed Condon

November 10, 2018

This weekend, the Catholic bishops of the United States gather in Baltimore ahead of their three-day annual general assembly, which opens Monday. By coincidence, it will be 16 years exactly since their session in 2002, when they met to amend and adopt two measures, now known as the Dallas Charter and the Essential Norms, in response to the last great eruption of the Church’s sex-abuse crisis in the United States.

On November 13, 2002, Cardinal Bernard Law of Boston, Cardinal Theodore McCarrick of Washington, and other luminaries took to the microphone to praise the “significant progress” that had been made. “Thank God we are where we are today,” Law told the bishops as they nodded along. “We’ve got to get past this,” McCarrick said. “We can’t have Dallas 2 and Dallas 3 and Dallas 4.”

Thanks in large measure to “Uncle Ted,” Dallas 2 is very much what the bishops are now facing: a comprehensive and codified response to a national moral crisis of credibility. Many Catholics report that, while they continue to trust their local priest, they consider the episcopate suspect.

Many of the country’s senior prelates are looking forward to Baltimore as the moment when they can begin to move past the scandals of the past few months. Many concede that sacrifices will have to be offered, and publicly. A binding code of conduct for bishops has been circulated, as has a detailed proposal for a new independent commission to investigate accusations against bishops.

The bishops will be desperate to leave Baltimore with a tangible result; votes will be cast and measures adopte

Catholic church to ID clergy accused of child sex abuse in Mobile and Birmingham

BIRMINGHAM (AL)
ABC 33 News

November 9, 2018

By Brian Pia & Stephen Gallien

The Archdiocese of Mobile says it’ll release a list of clergy removed from the ministry following accusations of child sex abuse.

Those accusations date back to the 1950s.

The Catholic dioceses in Birmingham, Biloxi and Jackson, Mississippi will also release lists of accused clergy.

There’s no word on a timeline.

These local developments come three months after a Pennsylvania grand jury alleged that hundreds of priests molested more than 1,000 children since the 1940s.

At the time, Birmingham Bishop Robert Baker referred to it as “ a gut-wrenching betrayal by those in ordained ministry."

Following Bishop's Press Conference, Fr. Zilliox Speaks Out to Clarify Comments

BUFFALO (NY)
Spectrum News

November 9, 2018

A priest who brought national attention to the clergy sex abuse scandal in the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo is speaking out to clarify some statements he made during a 60 Minutes interview.

Father Robert Zilliox serves at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Swormville. He told 60 Minutes he was disgusted by how the cases he saw were handled.

He released a statement Friday saying some comments made during the interview have been misunderstood by some and mischaracterized or falsely contradicted by others.

During the interview, he referred to “eight or nine” accused priests in the diocese who remain in the priesthood but he believes should have been removed.

Medley says Diocese will be more transparent when reviewing abuse allegations

OWENSBORO (KY)
Messenger-Inquirer

November 11, 2018

By James Mayse

The bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Owensboro said Friday the diocese will work to be more open and transparent about how it handles allegations of sexual abuse by priests.

The Most Rev. William Medley told reporters at a Friday morning news conference he will have former members of the Diocesan Review Board, which investigates reports of sexual abuse, review the list of 27 priests who have been accused of abuse in the Diocese since 1937 to determine if those names should be made public.

Medley called the press conference the day after he held the last of four "listening sessions" across the diocese to hear concerns about reports of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church. Medley referenced the Pennsylvania grand jury report released in August where, according to the New York Times, a grand jury found church officials in that state knew of more than 300 priests who had abused more than 1,000 victims over a 70-year period.

Medley says Diocese will be more transparent when reviewing abuse allegations

OWENSBORO (KY)
Messenger-Inquirer

November 11, 2018

By James Mayse

The bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Owensboro said Friday the diocese will work to be more open and transparent about how it handles allegations of sexual abuse by priests.

The Most Rev. William Medley told reporters at a Friday morning news conference he will have former members of the Diocesan Review Board, which investigates reports of sexual abuse, review the list of 27 priests who have been accused of abuse in the Diocese since 1937 to determine if those names should be made public.

Medley called the press conference the day after he held the last of four "listening sessions" across the diocese to hear concerns about reports of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church. Medley referenced the Pennsylvania grand jury report released in August where, according to the New York Times, a grand jury found church officials in that state knew of more than 300 priests who had abused more than 1,000 victims over a 70-year period.

New York parishioners are using the collection basket to ask embattled Catholic bishop to resign

BUFFALO (NY)
CNN

November 10, 2018

By Rosa Flores

In the deeply Catholic Rust Belt community of Buffalo, New York, some parishioners are using the Sunday collection basket to ask embattled Bishop Richard Malone to resign. Instead of giving money, some faithful are leaving handwritten messages giving the church an ultimatum.

"We will resume our weekly offering when the Bishop resigns or is removed," read one handwritten note that was placed in a Sunday collection basket and shared with CNN.

The source who provided the notes to CNN asked not to be identified for fear of retaliation. In an email, the diocese said it was aware of a few such notes received months ago.

Malone came under fire after his former executive assistant, Siobhan O'Connor, leaked documents to CNN and other media outlets suggesting the bishop did not sanction priests accused of sexual abuse and concealed the identities of alleged predator priests.

Bishop-Elect Encourages Chicago Priests to Address Abuse Crisis

CHICAGO (IL)
The Oracle

November 9, 2018

Chicago Catholic priests are being encouraged to discuss the priest sex abuse crisis this weekend, according to a letter from a high-ranking member of the Chicago Archdiocese obtained by NBC 5.

The latest letter follows one published by Cardinal Blase Cupich last week, expressing his “anger, shock, grief and shame” following the explosive grand jury report that detailed hundreds of “predator priests.”

Vicar General Ron Hicks, a Bishop-elect, sent a second letter to the priests, telling them “I encourage you to publish the Cardinal’s letter in your bulletin and put it on your parish’s website.”

Hicks tells the priests “we should not be afraid to touch these wounds.”

While not every priest addressed the issue last week, it’s now very clear the Archdiocese wants the topic addressed. There are reports that parishioners applauded — and in some cases offered standing ovations — to those priests who did speak last Sunday about the crisis.

Springfield bishop: No 'specific local requests' to reopen clergy sex abuse cases, documents being preserved

SPRINGFIELD (MA)
The Republican

November 9, 2018

By Anne-Gerard Flynn

Bishop Mitchell Rozanski, who will attend next week's bishops meeting in Baltimore, said his Springfield diocese has not had any "specific local requests" to reopen investigations here into clergy sex abuse cases.

Rozanski said his diocese, which covers the four counties of Western Massachusetts, has been asked by the U.S. Department of Justice, as all dioceses have in the wake of a Pennsylvania report, to "preserve" its related documents.

"To date while we have not had any specific local requests, like all U.S. dioceses, we have been asked to preserve documents as part of the U.S. Attorney's investigation focusing on the Pennsylvania dioceses," Rozanski said.

"I have expanded this request to include all our parishes and schools."

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will gather Monday through Wednesday for its 2018 Fall General Assembly in Baltimore.

Rozanski will be among the attendees who will vote on proposals approved by the USCCB's administrative committee to address clergy sex abuse issues that continue to impact dioceses around country.

Diocese of San Diego's List of Abusive Priests 'Incomplete', Attorney Claims

SAN DIEGO (CA)
NBC 7 News

November 9, 2018

By R. Stickney

A San Diego law firm is requesting the California Attorney General investigate a list of priests accused of child abuse and misconduct recently released by the Catholic Diocese of San Diego.

The Diocese recently released a list of more than 50 abusive priests in San Diego and San Bernardino of whom the diocese said it had received a credible allegation involving sexual abuse of a minor.

The reverends on the list served within the diocese for decades. Some served as far back as the 1940s.

Attorney Irwin Zalkin and victims of sexual abuse said Thursday that the list is far from complete.

Plan to house accused priest near a middle school questioned

PIEDMONT (SD)
KOTA TV

November 9, 2018

By Stewart Huntington

Some Piedmont parents are questioning why Catholic authorities want to house an accused priest at a church residence across the street from a middle school.

Father John Praveen was arrested on Oct. 22 following a joint Rapid City Police and Pennington County Sheriff's Office investigation. He is accused of having sexual contact with a 13-year-old girl on two occasions. He is being held in the Pennington County Jail pending trial. His bail has been set at $100,000 cash only.

On Tuesday a lawyer for Praveen asked a judge to release Praveen from jail before trial. Attorney John Murphy said the Diocese of Rapid City would put Praveen under its supervision at Casa Maria, a church property in Piedmont for retired priests. "Father John will be monitored," Murphy said adding that no children are present at Casa Maria.

KOTA Territory News received calls from concerned parents almost immediately.

Casa Maria sits along Sturgis Road in Piedmont and is directly across the street from the Stagebarn Middle School -- and two day care centers.

Trust, safety don’t come from church silence

STORM LAKE (IA)
Storm Lake Times

November 9, 2018

By Randy Evans

David prevailed over Goliath in the famous tale from long ago using an unconventional weapon, his sling and a few stones.

These days, river rocks aren’t a potent weapon. Now, it might just be the spotlight.

And the spotlight was shining brightly last week in Iowa when an Associated Press reporter cracked open 32 years of cover-up by the Roman Catholic Church’s Sioux City Diocese.

The AP report motivated church leaders in Sioux City to do something they had resisted for decades. They admitted that one of their priests was a sexual deviant, although they did not choose that blunt word. Nor did they use the term “criminal,” although he certainly is that.

Until the disclosures by the AP’s Ryan Foley made headlines across the nation, the diocese had successfully concealed from its 100,000 unsuspecting members, from law enforcement officers and from the unsuspecting public the despicable conduct by one of its priests.

Father Jerome Coyle, now 85, admitted to church leaders in 1986 that he was sexually attracted to and had “victimized” about 50 boys over the span of about 20 years. During that time, Coyle had served in 10 Iowa communities.

Bishops obliged to make ‘real changes’ amid crisis

INDIANAPOLIS (IN)
Indianapolis Archdiocese

By Archbishop Charles C. Thompson

Every November, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) meets for our annual fall gathering in Baltimore.

As described in its mission statement (cf. www.usccb.org), the USCCB exists to: 1) help the bishops of the United States “act collaboratively and consistently on vital issues confronting the Church and society; 2) foster communion with the Church in other nations, within the Church Universal, under the leadership of its supreme pastor, the Roman Pontiff; and 3) offer appropriate assistance to each bishop in fulfilling his particular ministry in the local Church.”

When we gather as brother bishops, we address a wide variety of topics and concerns, but we pay special attention to priority goals established for a three-year period. The five priority areas identified for the period 2017-2020 are: 1) Evangelization; 2) Family and marriage; 3) Human life and dignity; 4) Vocations and ongoing formation and 5) Religious freedom.

These are vital issues, and they will be addressed at our meeting in Baltimore next week as time permits, but obviously, in this climate dominated by allegations of sexual abuse and cover-up by Church leaders, there can be no “business as usual.”

In response to abuse scandals, bishops to debate code of conduct

WASHINGTON (DC)
Washington Post

November 9, 2018

By Julie Zauzmer

After months of outcry from American Catholics this year, demanding that bishops be held accountable for decades of child abuse by priests, the bishops will meet in person for the first time for a dayslong reckoning about how to address the crisis.

In a highly unusual move, the bishops will put aside almost everything else on their agenda for the annual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops next week in order to focus solely on rectifying their policies on abuse. The leaders of all 196 U.S. archdioceses and dioceses are invited to attend the Baltimore event.

Many bishops and lay leaders hope that they will emerge from the meeting with sweeping new procedures in place, including a lay commission empowered to investigate abuse by bishops, a new code of conduct and a plan for bishops removed from office due to their handling of abuse.

“When we come out of the meeting and are able to communicate what will be different moving forward, it’s my hope that all those who’ve been asking for such concrete steps will recognize: The bishops heard us,” said Bishop Michael Burbidge, who leads Virginia’s Diocese of Arlington. “We hear what you said, and we share those concerns. And we’re doing something about it.”

That’s a lot to get done in one meeting. But before the work begins, they will devote almost an entire day of the three-day session in Baltimore purely to prayer.

“All prayer. No agenda items. It’s just a day of prayer from morning until night. I think that shows the importance, that we recognize that we need some divine assistance here,” Burbidge said.

The bishops have been a primary focus of Catholics’ anger this summer and fall, starting with the release of a major grand jury report in Pennsylvania in August. That report, which probed seven decades of church history and found more than 300 priests had abused more than 1,000 children, drew attention to the conduct of bishops in the state’s Catholic dioceses, who sometimes moved an abusive priest to another parish or let him return to his ministry rather than removing him or reporting him to police.

Local clergy abuse victims call for an investigation

NASHVILLE (TN)
Fox 13 TV

November 9, 2018

By Siobhan Riley

Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests or SNAP is putting pressure on the Catholic diocese to tell the truth about former priests from across the state accused of sexually abusing minors.

FOX13 traveled to Nashville where that group suggested the TBI and other outlets investigate.

SNAP leaders met outside the courthouse in downtown Nashville.

Brown who has Memphis ties showed FOX13 a picture when from his childhood which he said brings back painful memories from 1961.

That’s the year he says he was sexually abused by a priest in Nashville.

“In rural area out there, he would pick me up, take me off in his car, which is out highway 100, quite a ways away and that’s where he raped me,” he explained.

Brown along with other leaders of Survivors Network of those abused by Priests told FOX13 the Diocese of Nashville isn’t capable of handling the investigation

November 9, 2018

Clergy Child-Abuse Film in Catholic Poland Breaks Box Office Records

POLAND
Bloomberg

November 9, 2018

By Dorota Bartyzel

A Polish movie about pedophilia among the clergy has triggered a spike in negative attitude toward the church in one of Europe’s most Catholic nations.

Titled “Kler,” the Polish word for “clergy,” the film has broken box-office records in the country of 38 million people, attracting more than a tenth of the population to watch it in theaters. It explores child abuse, romantic liaisons, corruption, greed and alcoholism among clerics and has drawn condemnation from the nationalist ruling party, which has vowed to “re-Christianize” the European Union.

Since the movie’s debut, the number of Poles who disapprove of the church has jumped to 29 percent, from a consistent 20 percent in the past, according to an October survey by the CBOS pollster.

Mobile, Birmingham Catholic clergy accused of child sex abuse to be identified

MOBILE (AL)
AL.com

November 9, 2018

By Christopher Harress

The Archdiocese of Mobile announced Friday that it will publish a list of clergy removed from the ministry due to accusations of child sex abuse dating back to the 1950s.

The dioceses of Birmingham, Biloxi, and Jackson (MS) will also produce lists of clergy accused of similar abuses, according to the press release.

“It is a time-consuming effort to examine each clergy personnel file from the last almost 7 decades,” said the Archbishop of Mobile Thomas J. Rodi. “This effort is underway and will be completed as quickly as possible.”

The announcement comes a week after the Archdiocese of New Orleans released the names of 57 priests and other clergy that faced “credible” accusations of child sex abuse. All of those accused have since died or been removed from the clergy, according to the Archbishop of New Orleans Gregory Aymond.

Of the total, 20 priests named by Aymond were also responsible for investigating the child sex abuse accusations.

Deceased St. Bonaventure University friar was named in Los Angeles Archdiocese sex abuse report

ST. BONAVENTURE (NY)
Olean Times Herald

November 9, 2018

By Tom Dinki

Alleged abuse occurred in 1948

A longtime and now-deceased St. Bonaventure University friar had a child sexual abuse allegation against him stemming out of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

The Rev. Maurice Scheier, who worked at St. Bonaventure for nearly 60 years prior to his death in 1991, was among the 36 additional priests identified Monday by the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo as being credibly accused of child sex abuse.

While Buffalo Diocese did not specify the allegations, a claim against Scheier was detailed in a 2004 Los Angeles Archdiocese report on clergy sex abuse.

The Los Angeles Archdiocese has since removed the names of accused priests from the online version of this report, citing the list as “outdated.” But both Jeff Anderson & Associates, a Minnesota law firm that represents clergy sex abuse victims, and BishopAccountability.org, which tracks clergy sex abuse, report on their websites that the 2004 report previously stated one person accused Scheier of abuse and the alleged abuse occurred in 1948.

A St. Bonaventure official told the Olean Times Herald Thursday the claim against Scheier was not made until 2004 — 13 years after Scheier’s death. The official said the university was still gathering information, but planned to release a full statement today on Scheier’s inclusion in the Los Angeles report.

Church faces another allegation of clergy sex abuse

GUAM
Kuam News

November 8, 2018

By Krystal Paco

While the Archdiocese of Agana prepares to file bankruptcy, yet another victim of clergy sexual abuse files suit against the Church. Only identified by his initials to protect his identity, former 54-year-old Asan resident M.C.A. alleges he was sexually molested and abused by Monsignor Jose Ada Leon Guerrero and Father Raymond Techaira.

According to the complaint filed in the Superior Court of Guam, M.C.A was an altar boy at the Asan Parish. He was only 8-years-old when he alleges Guerrero raped him and performed sexual acts on him on parish grounds.

With hopes renewed for Child Victims Act passage, Gallivan introduces own version

BUFFALO (NY)
WBFO

November 8, 2018

By Michael Mroziak

With a pending change in political leadership in the New York State Senate, hopes are renewed for passage of a proposal which would ease statutes of limitation for adults seeking criminal or civil justice in childhood sexual abuse cases. On Thursday, a Republican State Senator introduced his own version of such legislation, while advocates for victims of alleged abuse by clergy suggest the church may seek to limit liability if such a bill is passed next year.

Senator Patrick Gallivan announced his version of a child victim bill, known as the Child Victims Protection and Accountability Act. It would eliminate any statute of limitation for criminal child sex abuse cases. For adults seeking civil action for offenses against them as a child, the age limit to pursue litigation would be extended to age 50. Current state law gives them up to the age of 23 to sue but critics argue many adults do not fully comprehend or process the trauma of their childhood ordeal until well into their adulthood.

A few settlements in nearly 200 clergy sex abuse cases

GUAM
Pacific Daily News

November 8, 2018

By Haidee V. Eugenio

Only about eight of the nearly 200 clergy sex abuse cases filed on Guam were settled during September's mediation, and parties in the lawsuits on Thursday asked the courts to give them until mid-January to continue negotiations.

Lawyers for plaintiffs and defendants gave U.S. District Court Chief Judge Frances Tydingco-Gatewood and Superior Court Judge Michael Bordallo an update about the ongoing mediation.

The Archdiocese of Agana's counsel also informed the courts of the church's planned filing of reorganization bankruptcy by mid-December to mid-January, to help settle the clergy abuse cases by using a combination of non-essential asset sale and insurance money.

The judges said they want another update about the negotiations by 8:30 a.m. on Jan. 18, 2019.

Update: Catholic agencies closely monitor giving after clergy sex abuse shock

WASHINGTON (DC)
Catholic News Service

November 8, 2018

By Dennis Sadowski

Leaders and fundraisers at Catholic organizations are cautiously monitoring the level of donations and gifts as the end-of-the-year giving season approaches, hoping that the clergy sexual abuse scandal won't negatively affect their bottom line.

While most of the professionals contacted by Catholic News Service said it is too early yet to see what effect, if any, the abuse crisis may have on giving, some are taking steps to reassure donors that money contributed to vital ministries is not going for settlements to abuse victims or payments to attorneys.

The crisis is just one factor that concerns the leaders. There's also the 2017 Tax Cut and Jobs Act. It's effect on giving remains a question mark. "People remain confused about it," said Franciscan Sister Georgette Lehmuth, president and CEO of the National Catholic Development Conference.

"The main thing is no one knows. It's way too early," Patrick Markey, executive director of the Diocesan Fiscal Management Conference, told CNS.

Philly's Catholic Church will borrow and sell to pay priest sex abuse victims

HARRISBURG (PA)
The Associated Press

November 8, 2018

Pennsylvania's Roman Catholic dioceses are starting to announce details about victim compensation funds they're setting up, nearly three months after a sweeping grand jury report documented decades of child sexual abuse by priests in the state.

The archdiocese of Philadelphia and the dioceses of Harrisburg, Scranton and Allentown on Thursday disclosed some information. The Erie Diocese says it's setting up a fund, but isn't ready to disclose details.

The announcements don't mention a total dollar amount or maximum individual payout.

Guam's Catholic Church To File Bankruptcy Amid Deluge Of Sex Abuse Lawsuits

GUAM
NPR

November 7, 2018

By Colin Dwyer

The Catholic Church in Guam has announced plans to file Chapter 11 bankruptcy, in an attempt to cope with the scores of sexual abuse claims against clergy in the U.S. territory. Archbishop Michael Byrnes said the Archdiocese of Agana settled on the move as the most expedient way to support the alleged victims.

"Over the last two years, we've done our best. We've strengthened our policies for a safe environment. We've educated over 2,000 people in the practices of safe environment protection of minors. We've made a lot of great strides," Byrnes said at a news conference Wednesday.

"But our biggest issue is the almost 200 victim survivors of sexual abuse."

Byrnes took over as archbishop on the West Pacific island in 2016, shortly after his predecessor, Anthony Apuron, was suspended under a cloud of suspicion. Apuron has been accused of sexually abusing minors — including his own nephew -- and helping to cover up similar abuses by priests and other Catholic authority figures in Guam. The allegations date back decades.

Earlier this year the Vatican convicted Apuron of unspecified charges, removed him from office and forbade him from returning to the territory, according to the Catholic News Agency. Apuron has flatly denied the allegations; the news service notes that Pope Francis is personally considering his appeal.

Meanwhile, back in Guam, the Catholic Church has been buried under a mound of lawsuits connected to the accusations. Keith Talbot, an attorney for the Church, said the decision to file bankruptcy grew out of information gleaned from mediation sessions beginning in September.

Parishioners invited to voice concerns about priest abuse with Bishop Zubik

ALLEGHENY (PA)
Trib Live

November 7, 2018

By Madasyn Czebiniak

Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh parishioners are invited to attend four sessions to express their thoughts and concerns in the wake of child sexual abuse accusations against priests.

Bishop David Zubik will host the sessions, the Diocese said.

Survivors of child sexual abuse by clergy and their family members, as well as parishioners, are invited to share their feelings and struggles.

Once all four listening sessions have been held, Zubik will prepare a pastoral response with the help of the facilitators, the release said.

“Over the course of the last weeks I have received many e-mails, text messages and letters from folks,” Zubik said in a statement. “I look forward to these opportunities to hear directly from people about what they expect of the Church so that I can best respond to their needs. Survivors of abuse and their families need not be silent about what they suffer and the faithful need an opportunity to express their feelings, concerns and questions.”

Priest-Sociologist Examines Data on Clergy Sex Abuse

IRONDALE (AL)
National Catholic Register

November 6, 2018

By Kevin Jones

Father Paul Sullins says links between abuse involve disproportionate number of homosexual clergy, ‘homosexual subculture’ in seminaries.

After years in decline, Catholic clergy sex abuse could be on the rise again, warns a professor-priest’s analysis of relevant data.

The professor’s report sees a rising trend in abuse and argues that the evidence strongly suggests links between sexual abuse of minors and two factors: a disproportionate number of homosexual clergy and the manifestation of a “homosexual subculture” in seminaries.

“The thing we’ve been told about the sex abuse — that it is somehow very rare and declined to almost nothing today — is really not true,” Father D. Paul Sullins, a Catholic priest and retired Catholic University of America sociology professor, told a Nov. 2 news conference.

“I found that clergy sex abuse did drop to almost nothing after 2002, but then it started to creep up,” he continued. “It’s been increasing. And there are signs that the bishops or the dioceses have gotten complacent about that.”

Spanish Church abuse victim: “He didn’t stop until he saw that we were on the verge of tears”

SPAIN
El Pais

November 5, 2018

By Joaquin Gil

The Salesian religious order has stood by Father López Luna, who is under investigation for abusing a 13-year-old. The following testimony is one of several making up an EL PAÍS series exposing decades of offenses by the clergy

The Salesian religious order still has a priest within its ranks who is under investigation for abusing a 13-year-old child in 2013. As confirmed by EL PAÍS, Father Francisco Javier López Luna maintains an office at the National Center for Youth Pastoral Care on Calle Alcalá, in Madrid.

“López Luna this year took charge of the Salesian community, and he is a member of the Youth Pastoral Care, a body that brings together the various groups within the order,” says one of its members.

The prosecution is seeking more than four years behind bars for López Luna, who is accused of a crime against the sexual integrity of a minor as well as degrading treatment.

During the school year 2012-2013, Manolo – a pseudonym – was studying his second year of high school at the Salesian School in Cádiz. He was then 13 and going three times a week to the principal’s office. The principal at the time was Francisco Javier López Luna. “When he touched me, he would bite his lip; he enjoyed it,” Manolo says, speaking out for the first time after two years in therapy.

Catholic priest charged with sex abuse at church

WASHINGTON (DC)
The Washington Post

November 7, 2018

By Clarence Williams and Julie Zauzmer

District of Columbia police arrested a priest from a Washington Catholic Church on Wednesday on charges that he sexually abused a teenager at the parish in 2015, officials said.

Urbano Vazquez, 46, of Washington was charged with second-degree child sexual abuse in connection with an incident at the Shrine of the Sacred Heart in May of that year.

According to a District police report, a 13-year-old girl told police that Vasquez put his hand down her shirt on two occasions on her bare skin. Vazquez was identified as a "pastor of that church that abuse occurred at," the police report said.

Pa. Catholic churches offer fund for victims of priest sex abuse, but there's a catch

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

November 8, 2018

By Candy Woodall

This could be a big help for people who can't wait for a lengthy court case or cannot emotionally endure that. But it restricts access to information that could help prevent more abuse.

People who were sexually abused by priests as children have a new avenue for justice in settlement funds being set up by Roman Catholic Dioceses in Pennsylvania, but taking the money now means they can never sue the church in court.

The Survivors’ Compensation Program will begin providing financial resources and other assistance to abuse survivors in January, according to Harrisburg diocese spokesman Mike Barley.

It's unclear how much money will be in the fund or how many people will be helped.

Information for how to apply for funds will be shared by the lawyers overseeing the fund, Kenneth Feinberg and Camille Biros. Feinberg previously administered a victims' fund for the Archdiocese of New York, the 9/11 Victim Compensation fund and others.

The Archdiocese of New York paid about $40 million to 189 victims of clergy sex abuse victims, according to an Associated Press report in December 2017.

Bishop Hartmayer releases list of those credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors

SAVANNAH (GA)
Diocese of Savannah

November 9, 2018

The Diocese of Savannah is committed to the protection of minors, as well as to compliance with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People. In a spirit of transparency and the hope of continued healing for the survivors of abuse, I have decided to release the list of the priests credibly accused of sexual abuse of a minor. The list below was compiled from the best information available to us at this time and covers the period from 1950 until now.

The list is divided into three parts:

Gallivan Proposes New Protections for Child Sex Abuse Victims

BUFFALO (NY)
Spectrum Local News

November 8, 2018

By Andy Young

In the midst of the clergy sex abuse scandal that's rocked the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo, State Senator Patrick Gallivan is proposing a new law to help protect children from those crimes in the future.

"When you see the names that the diocese has released, many of my constituents, me personally, I know a number of these priests and I'm very troubled," he said.

Gallivan has introduced the Child Victims and Protection and Accountability Act. It would require priests and other church officials report suspicions of abuse against a minor to law enforcement, just as many others are legally obligated to do.

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford Joins the Ranks of Women We’ve Failed in the Name of Justice

UNITED STATES
BRIT + CO

November 8, 2018

By Elizabeth King

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford made international waves for her bravery earlier this fall when she testified against Brett Kavanaugh during his Supreme Court confirmation hearings. Before Trump even selected Kavanaugh as the nominee to fill Antonin Scalia’s seat on the SCOTUS bench, Ford reached out to her political representatives to tell them she was concerned about Kavanaugh’s fitness for the role given her allegation that he had sexually assaulted her when both were in high school. Ford, now a professor of psychology, eventually gave a moving testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee that detailed the allegation and the effect of the memory.

Unfortunately, for carrying out what she described as her civic duty, Dr. Ford has been relentlessly attacked for months without reprieve.

According to a new NPR report, Ford’s lawyers say that she and her family have had to move homes four different times since Ford first came forward publicly with her accusations against Kavanaugh; the relocations, the lawyer says, are due to credible threats on her life. Kavanaugh, meanwhile, has since started his work as a Supreme Court justice.

Kavanaugh supporters attacked Ford’s motivations for testifying during the judge’s confirmation hearings, frequently suggesting that she was a paid liberal operative, or was merely seeking fame and fortune by testifying. Funds were in fact given to Ford, not for book deals or TV appearances as malicious opponents predicted (Ford’s lawyers say she has no interest in profiting from this experience), but for security detail.

Google outlines steps to tackle workplace harassment

SAN FRANCISCO (CA)
AFP

November 8, 2018

By Glenn Chapman

Google on Thursday outlined changes to its handling of sexual misconduct complaints, hoping to calm outrage that triggered a worldwide walkout of workers last week.

"We recognize that we have not always gotten everything right in the past and we are sincerely sorry for that," chief executive Sundar Pichai said in a message to employees, a copy of which was shared with AFP.

"It's clear we need to make some changes."

Arbitration of harassment claims will be optional instead of obligatory, according to Pichai, a move that could end anonymous settlements that fail to identify those accused of harassment.

"Google has never required confidentiality in the arbitration process and it still may be the best path for a number of reasons (e.g. personal privacy, predictability of process), but, we recognize that the choice should be up to you," he said in the memo.

Google bows to worker pressure on sexual misconduct policy

SAN FRANCISCO (CA)
The Associated Press

November 8, 2018

By Michael Liedtke

Google is promising to be more forceful and open about its handling of sexual misconduct cases, a week after thousands of high-paid engineers and others walked out in protest over its male-dominated culture.

Google bowed to one of the protesters' main demands by dropping mandatory arbitration of all sexual misconduct cases. That will now be optional, so workers can choose to sue in court and present their case in front of a jury. It mirrors a change made by ride-hailing service Uber after complaints from its female employees prompted an internal investigation. The probe concluded that its rank had been poisoned by rampant sexual harassment.

"Google's leaders and I have heard your feedback and have been moved by the stories you've shared," CEO Sundar Pichai said in an email to Google employees. "We recognize that we have not always gotten everything right in the past and we are sincerely sorry for that. It's clear we need to make some changes." Thursday's email was obtained by The Associated Press.

Last week, the tech giant's workers left their cubicles in dozens of offices around the world to protest what they consider management's lax treatment of top executives and other male workers accused of sexual harassment and other misconduct. The protest's organizers estimated that about 20,000 workers participated.

The reforms are the latest fallout from a broader societal backlash against men's exploitation of their female subordinates in business, entertainment and politics — a movement that has spawned the "MeToo" hashtag as a sign of unity and a call for change.

Church prepares for bankruptcy filing

GUAM
KUAM News

November 8, 2018

By Krystal Paco

The Church prepares the faithful for bankruptcy.

Archbishop Michael Byrnes, in a letter to the faithful this week writes "I encourage each and every Catholic to look at this newest chapter in the history of our young archidiocese in that light... the Light of Christ. This is an opportunity to reorganize ourselves, to become a better Church - the best we can be."

As reported, it was earlier this week the Archdiocese of Agana announced its intent to file Chapter 11 reorganization in light of the nearly 200 clergy sexual abuse lawsuits.

Guam would be one of over two dozen other dioceses and religious orders in the U.S. mainland to do this in the last 15 years.

Though parties attempted to mediate back in September, settlement was not reached.

Survivors' network calls for resignation of DiNardo, former Sioux City bishop

SIOUX CITY (IA)
Sioux City Journal

November 8, 2018

By Mason Dockter

A group of Catholic church sexual abuse survivors has called on Cardinal Daniel DiNardo to resign as head of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, citing his alleged role in a three-decades-old cover up of a former Sioux City diocese priest who sexually abused more than 50.

The diocese on Tuesday publicly apologized for mishandling the case of the Rev. Jerome Coyle, who was stripped of his parish duties in 1986 after acknowledging to church authorities his sexual attraction to and contact with boys while serving several Northwest Iowa parishes over a 20-year period.

The case was brought to light on Oct. 31 by an Associated Press investigation that revealed the diocese, without explanation, announced that Coyle was taking a six-month medical leave of absence. Church officials transferred him to a treatment center in New Mexico where other accused priests nationwide were once commonly sent. The diocese pointed out that was the protocol at the time.

Google Revamps Harassment Policies Following Employee Protests

SAN FRANCISCO (CA)
ALM Media

November 8, 2018

Google Inc. CEO Sundar Pichai announced Thursday an “action plan” aimed at addressing sexual harassment and inequality at the tech giant, tweaking arbitration policies, training requirements and reporting processes in response to criticism that the company protected top executives and enabled misconduct to persist.

Pichai’s memo to employees comes after thousands of employees at Google staged a walkout last week at the company's California headquarters and offices around the country. The protest followed a New York Times report that noted instances where the company allegedly suppressed accusations of sexual misconduct among top executives.

Google joins an ever-growing list of companies that have been forced to reckon with accusations of workplace power imbalances between male and female colleagues. In the aftermath of the #MeToo movement, many large companies have updated internal policies and sought to curtail the use of nondisclosure agreements that can silence victims of abuse.

Trump’s False Narrative On Assault And Jim Acosta Is Convenient For Him And No One Else

WASHINGTON (DC)
The Huffington Post

November 8, 2018

By Alanna Vagianos

The White House outright lied about the CNN reporter “placing his hands on a young woman” and barred him from future press conferences.

CNN reporter Jim Acosta’s press credentials were revoked by the White House on Wednesday because, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said, he put his hands on a female White House intern when she attempted to take away his microphone during a news conference.

“President Trump believes in a free press and expects and welcomes tough questions of him and his administration,” Sanders wrote in a series of tweets after the incident. “We will, however, never tolerate a reporter placing his hands on a young woman just trying to do her job as a White House intern. This conduct is absolutely unacceptable.” (The controversy only heated up when Sanders shared a doctored video of the episode to defend the administration’s decision.)

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway piled onto the false allegation on Thursday in an interview on Fox News.

“Obviously, I don’t think anybody should have, any young woman, particularly, should have swiping away at them, grabbing the microphone back,” she said. “That’s very unfortunate. I have talked to that young woman. She is very brave and just doing her job.”

In reality, footage shows that the exchange between Acosta and the intern was mild and, despite the administration’s insinuation, he was not violent in any way. The intern attempted to take the microphone from him three times as President Donald Trump repeatedly cut the reporter off. During the intern’s final attempt, Acosta’s hand briefly brushed her arm, and he said, “Pardon me, ma’am.”

Washington priest arrested for groping teenage girl in 2015

UNITED STATES
La Croix International

November 9, 2018

Another priest implicated in cover-up; both men now banned from preaching at state churches

A Catholic priest in Washington D.C. has been arrested for allegedly putting his hands down the shirt of a young female parishioner on multiple occasions in May 2015.

Read Google CEO's response to employee sexual harassment protests

SAN FRANCISCO (CA)
CNBC

November 8, 2018

By Jillian D'Onfro

- Google has revamped its sexual harassment policies in the wake of employee protests.
- Last Thursday, 20,000 Google employees walked out of their offices around the world in response to a bombshell New York Times report that detailed how the company shielded executives accused of sexual misconduct.
- The company has responded to many of the protest organizers' demands, though it will not add an employee representative to Alphabet's board.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai sent a memo to employees Thursday detailing changes to its sexual harassment and misconduct policies in the wake of massive protests last week.

More than 20,000 Google employees walked out of their offices Thursday following a bombshell New York Times report that detailed how the company has shielded executives accused of sexual misconduct, with organizers demanding concrete changes like a new system for reporting abuse and an employee representative on the company's board.

"This is an area where we need to continually make progress and are committed to doing so," Pichai wrote in his memo.

Google leadership also held a town-hall style meeting with employees following the publication of Pichai's memo on Thursday.

French bishops on pedophilia, a noticeable change in tone

FRANCE
La Croix International

November 9, 2018

By Isabelle de Gaulmyn

The victims are at the core of a declaration which marks without a doubt a new style in the bishops' approach against pedophilia, says an editor at La Croix

I have not always been tender with the institution of the Church in matters of pedophilia.

My own story, namely my past as a Lyon scout in the troop of Father Bernard Preynat,* led me to become personally, and sometimes painfully, involved in this “combat.”

No-one can ever accuse me of complacency with the bishops on this issue.

However, being a journalist is also recognizing things that are done, highlighting the positive.

Bishops in France set up commission on sexual abuse

FRANCE
La Croix International

November 9, 2018

By Anne-Bénédicte Hoffner

On the day before the closing of their plenary assembly, bishops decide ‘by a massive majority’ to establish independent commission

A “profound moment of encounter, in humility and listening.” This is how the president of the French Bishops’ Conference Archbishop Georges Pontier of Marseille described the meeting with victims of sexual abuse.

By meeting victims for the first time at their plenary assembly in Lourdes, the bishops acknowledged “the long-lasting and profound damage” caused by the acts of abuse themselves and also by “the inadequate taking into account of these acts by ecclesial authorities, and the feeling of not being heard at all.”

Sex abuse survivors: Archbishop Kurtz isn't doing enough to protect his flock

LOUISVILLE (KY)
Courier-Journal

November 7, 2018

By Caitlin McGlade

Two senior Catholic officials who remained silent decades ago when priests were accused of sexually abusing Louisville children have been kept in power — and even promoted — on Archbishop Joseph Kurtz's watch.

That's not what many Louisville Catholics expected when Kurtz arrived in 2007 to take over the archdiocese, which was rocked by a major child sex abuse scandal a few years earlier.

Previous church leaders in Kentucky's largest Catholic community had allowed abusive priests to remain in ministry while silencing their victims, a practice laid bare when hundreds sued the church, winning a $25.7 million settlement in 2003.

Kurtz came in as a warm and inviting man with a remarkable ability to remember everyone's name. It was hoped he would help heal wounds in the archdiocese. Abuse survivor Cal Pfeiffer recalls thinking the new archbishop was either incredibly nice or just a great politician.

A decade later, some abuse survivors say they know which it is.

Google pledges to overhaul its sexual harassment policy after global protests

SAN FRANCISCO (CA)
The Guardian

November 8, 2018

By Sam Levin

Company faced historic staff backlash following revelation it paid out $90m to an executive accused of sexual misconduct

The CEO of Google, Sundar Pichai, said the company would overhaul its sexual harassment policies, meeting some of the demands of employees who organized historic walkouts across the globe.

In an email to staff on Thursday, Pichai said Google would end forced arbitration for sexual misconduct claims, revamp its investigations process, share data on harassment claims and outcomes, and provide new support systems for people who come forward. The announcement is a notable achievement for employees who organized roughly 20,000 workers to walk out of the corporation’s offices across 50 cities last week.

Google Overhauls Sexual Misconduct Policy After Employee Walkout

SAN FRANCISCO (CA)
The New York Times

November 8, 2018

By Kate Conger and Daisuke Wakabayashi

Google said on Thursday that it would end its practice of forced arbitration for claims of sexual harassment or assault after more than 20,000 employees staged a walkout last week to protest how the internet company handles cases of sexual misconduct.

Workers at Google had called for an end to arbitration, among other changes, as part of the walkout. The protest was prompted by a New York Times article last month that revealed the company had given a senior executive, Andy Rubin, a $90 million exit package even after it found he had been credibly accused of sexual harassment.

[Read about how Google protected Mr. Rubin, the “father of Android,” after he was accused of harassment.]

The shift was announced at a delicate time for Google. Apart from the scrutiny over its workplace culture, employees have pushed back this year over issues like an artificial intelligence contract with the Pentagon and the company’s exploration of a plan to relaunch its search platform in China. The employee protests over harassment, which followed the #MeToo movement, have been Google’s largest and most public.

Pittsburgh, other Pa. dioceses to establish compensation fund for sex abuse victims

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
The Philadelphia Inquirer

November 8, 2018

By Angela Couloumbis and Jeremy Roebuck

Amid a renewed furor over the Catholic church’s handling of clergy sex abuse, several of Pennsylvania’s Catholic dioceses, including Pittsburgh, announced plans Thursday to launch programs to financially compensate victims whose claims are too old to be taken to court.

Church officials in Philadelphia, Allentown, Harrisburg, Greensburg and Scranton unveiled similar funds Thursday. A spokesperson for the Diocese of Erie said Bishop Lawrence Persico planned to open a compensation program there, too, though the details were not yet ready for public disclosure. (The Altoona-Johnstown diocese did not announce any plans for such a fund and instead issued a news release touting money they had already spent on things like therapy for sex abuse victims over the last two decades.)

Though many details on the so-called “reconciliation and reparation funds” remained hazy — including just how much money is up for grabs statewide and where it would come from — victims and their advocates warily welcomed the idea.

Some whose claims have been long been barred from courtrooms by civil statutes of limitations found hope in the prospect of finally receiving compensation for abuse they endured decades ago.

5 more sex abuse lawsuits for Santa Fe Archdiocese

ALBUQUERQUE (NM)
Albuquerque Journal

November 8, 2018

By Colleen Heild

Five new childhood sexual abuse lawsuits have been filed against the Archdiocese of Santa Fe – two involving alleged Catholic priest assaults on girls, and one alleged victim coming forward more than 60 years after the abuse occurred.

Defendants include parishes in Albuquerque and in the northern New Mexico communities of Ranchos de Taos and Abiquiú and the Servants of the Paraclete, which ran a treatment center for pedophile priests in Jemez Springs.

The lawsuits, filed by the Albuquerque law firm of Brad Hall this week in state District Court in Albuquerque, contend the archdiocese caused childhood sexual abuse by priests and failed to prevent the misconduct, causing decades of harm to victims who suppressed what occurred to them as children.

Statement on Child Protection Matter at Sacred Heart Parish

WASHINGTON (DC)
Archdiocese of Washington

November 7, 2018

The Archdiocese of Washington is steadfastly committed to the protection of youth and the healing of those harmed by abuse and adheres to a zero-tolerance policy for credible claims of abuse made against archdiocesan clergy, religious orders operating in the archdiocese, staff and volunteers.

On Friday, October 26, the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin (OFM Cap.), which for many years has overseen the pastoral ministry and governance of Shrine of the Sacred Heart parish in Washington, informed the archdiocese that it had received an allegation of sexual abuse against Father Urbano Vazquez, OFM, Cap. The allegation was also reported to the D.C. Metropolitan Police. Father Vazquez has served as parochial vicar at Sacred Heart since 2014.

This was the first report to the Archdiocese of this allegation of sexual abuse and immediately upon learning of this serious allegation, the Archdiocese immediately removed Father Vazquez from ministry and suspended his priestly faculties. Since the initial claim to police, additional allegations against Father Vazquez were reported.

The Archdiocese of Washington takes seriously its responsibility to protect the children entrusted to its care. The Child Protection Policy of the Archdiocese of Washington mandates criminal background checks, applications and education for all employees and volunteers who work with young people. In this case, Father Vazquez cleared the background check and accompanying requirements.

In reviewing this troubling matter, the Archdiocese subsequently determined that Father Moises Villalta, OFM Cap., pastor of Sacred Heart, failed to follow appropriate protocols related to reporting allegations of abuse to civil authorities and the Archdiocese of Washington. Father Villalta has been removed as pastor. For similar reasons, the parish’s child protection coordinator has been placed on administrative leave.

Clergy sex abuse victims slam Catholic church plans for compensation funds

PENNSYLVANIA
Penn Live

November 8, 2018

By Ivey DeJesus

Earlier this year, when Attorney General Josh Shapiro released the findings of a grand jury investigation into clergy sex abuse in Pennsylvania, he underscored one key recommendation issued by investigators.

Victims who had long ago been sexually abused by priests should be given a retroactive reprieve during which they could file lawsuits against predators, the grand jury said.

That recommendation seems destined for the dustbin for now. Pennsylvania lawmakers haven’t been able to agree on changes to state law that would allow victims to go to court.

And the decision by virtually every diocese investigated by the grand jury to establish victims compensation funds is drawing the ire of the state’s top law enforcement official and clergy sex abuse victims.

“It’s now clear that the Dioceses acknowledge the Grand Jury accurately unearthed horrific and extensive abuse and cover up and, as a result, victims deserve compensation no matter when their abuse happened,” Shapiro said Thursday. “However, the Grand Jury recommended that victims deserve their day in court – not that the church should be the arbiter of its own punishment."

Cruces diocese lists 28 suspected sex abusers

LAS CRUCES (NM)
Albuquerque Journal

November 9, 2018

By Angela Kocherga

The Catholic Diocese of Las Cruces released the names of 28 priests who have been “credibly accused” of sexually abusing minors.

“These stories are shocking and demand that we find ways to work together and address the issues honestly and openly,” said Bishop Gerald F. Kicanas, the Apostolic administrator. Kicanas is serving in that role until a new bishop is named to replace Bishop Oscar Cantu, who left Las Cruces for the Diocese of San Jose.

“By publishing this list, the Diocese of Las Cruces is seeking to be transparent and accountable, and we invite anyone who may have been abused by church personnel to come forward and report that abuse to the proper authorities,” Kicanas told a news conference Thursday.

Why Iowans may never know the full extent of child sexual abuse and cover-ups by priests

DES MOINES (IA)
Des Moines Register

November 9, 2018

By Daniel P. Finney

It’s been revealed that hundreds of priests in Pennsylvania were part of child sex abuse cover up.
Iowans may never know the extent of child sexual abuse by priests and subsequent cover-ups by dioceses in the state at the level of detail now known about Pennsylvania.

Even after the revelation from Iowa Associated Press reporter Ryan Foley about abuse by the Rev. Jerome Coyle, who admitted in 1986 to abusing at least 50 boys over 20 years, a massive statewide investigation such as the one in Pennsylvania is unlikely in Iowa, because of the way the state’s laws are written.

The power to conduct investigations is generally left to local jurisdictions rather than the state. Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller’s deputies can assist or lead an investigation at the request of a local county attorney, but can rarely launch a formal investigation, said Lynn Hicks, spokesman for Miller.

“Pennsylvania used a statewide grand jury statute, which is a power Iowa law doesn’t specifically give the state attorney general,” Hicks said.

OK, fine. Let the local jurisdictions take it up. There are three dioceses in Iowa — Davenport, Des Moines and Sioux City — and the archdiocese in Dubuque.

Why don’t the county attorneys in Scott, Polk, Woodbury and Dubuque talk up the investigation?

“We operate on complaints,” said Ralph Potter, Dubuque county attorney. “If we had a report of abuse by clergy in our district, that would justify us looking into it, but we can’t just start an investigation without having cause.”

Iowa law enforcement is also hampered by the state’s statute of limitations for sex crimes. Currently, state law allows for prosecution of sex abuse crimes committed against minors to be brought up to 10 years after the minor turns 18.

Coyle reported his abuse to the now-retired Bishop Lawrence Soens, who later was found to have abused students when he was a priest and parochial school principal.

Editorial: Buffalo Diocese in desperate need of reform

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

November 8, 2018

By News Editorial Board

Bishop Richard J. Malone embarked on a media tour recently, doing interviews with print and broadcast media and last Monday holding a news conference in Cheektowaga to discuss the clergy sex abuse scandal.

Malone vowed to do a better job of being open about the diocese’s handling of the issue, saying that transparency begins with him. The prelate’s steps toward openness are welcome, but aren’t likely to relieve the pressure on him to step down or to change the way the diocese conducts business. Both of those outcomes need to happen.

Malone told the news conference the diocese has been overwhelmed by “a tsunami” of new claims of child sex abuse. The diocese added 36 priests’ names to a list of clergymen credibly accused of abuse, bringing the total to 78.

Apart from Malone’s displays of resolve and contrition, there has also been a misbegotten media counteroffensive from the diocese and its communications team, including a press release questioning the credibility of Siobhan O’Connor, the former assistant who leaked confidential diocesan documents about clergy abuse to a TV station and discussed her actions on the CBS news magazine “60 Minutes.” The diocese press release attempted to smear her for what it said were “embarrassingly contradictory” comments by O’Connor but which, in fact, were a reflection of a believer torn by genuine affection for Malone and revulsion at his actions.

That’s the kind of messaging we expect from political candidates. The fact that it came from a chancery shows how the unfolding scandal has rattled the diocese.

The 72-year-old bishop is in a tough spot, being in some cases forced to answer for crimes of abuse committed decades before he arrived in Buffalo. However, some of his statements about the diocese’s handling of priests accused of abuse still don’t ring true.

Open letter to the US Catholic bishops: It's over

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter

November 9, 2018

by NCR Editorial Staff

Dear brothers in Christ, shepherds, fellow pilgrims,

We address you as you approach this year's national meeting in Baltimore because we know there is nowhere left to hide.

It's over.

All the manipulations and contortions of the past 33 years, all the attempts to deflect and equivocate — all of it has brought the church, but especially you, to this moment.

It's over.

Even the feds are now on the trail. They've ordered that you not destroy any documents. The Department of Justice is conducting a national criminal investigation of how you've handled the clergy sex abuse scandal. It is a point in our history without precedent. We want you to know that you aren't alone in this moment, you've not been abandoned. But this time it must be different. This time it won't be easy.

From fable to sacred text, we know how this goes. The point is reached where all realize the king wears no clothes, the righteous accusers read the writing in the sand and fade away, the religious authorities receive the Master's most stinging rebukes. As a class of religious rulers, the loudest among you have become quite good at applying the law and claiming divine authority in marginalizing those who transgress the statutes. The prolonged abuse scandal would suggest, however, that you've not done very well taking stock of yourselves.

We have no special insight into why this moment — the Pennsylvania grand jury report, the downfall of Theodore McCarrick — has so captured the public imagination and pushed the church to this outer limit of exposure and vulnerability. There are theories, not least of which is that the opportunists among us are attempting to use this moment to bring down the only pope who has actually dethroned bishops and a cardinal for their crimes and indiscretions.

Baltimore archbishop outlines path toward reform and renewal in the Catholic Church

BALTIMORE (MD)
Baltimore Sun

November 9, 2018

By William E. Lori

As is customary this time of year, Baltimore is again hosting the nation’s Catholic bishops, who are convening here in America’s first Roman Catholic diocese for extensive discussions about the relevance and impact of Catholic faith in American society. This year in particular, because of the severe crisis confronting the church, the agenda, deliberations and outcomes of our meeting are rightly under intense scrutiny.

The widely reported instances of child sexual abuse by Catholic clergy, the sexual harassment of adults and subsequent cover-up by far too many bishops are nothing short of horrific. These were crimes committed by men who presented themselves as God’s representatives. Instead, they betrayed the trust of the innocent and their calling. The systematic concealment by church authorities and attempts to silence victims in the effort to spare the church liability and scandal was not only misguided but fundamentally and morally wrong. The cumulative fallout has led to a profound crisis of faith and identity among Catholics around the world.

The path to restoring trust and the credibility of church leaders is still uncertain but will unquestionably be long and difficult. The extensive listening sessions that I conducted with parishioners across the archdiocese made this abundantly clear. Essential to the process of healing is complete transparency, while also making clear the steps that have and will be taken to prevent such things from happening again.

Since 2002, when the issue of child sex abuse by Catholic clergy initially came to the forefront, the Archdiocese of Baltimore became one of the first dioceses in the world to publicly disclose the names of all credibly accused priests, dating back to the 1940s. In the 16 years since, the archdiocese has publicly disclosed the names of credibly accused priests whenever new allegations have become known. Moreover, it is the policy of the Archdiocese of Baltimore that any allegation of abuse be promptly reported to civil authorities, including Maryland’s attorney general. Recently, it was announced that the Office of the Attorney General for the state of Maryland is conducting an investigation into the past and current practices of the archdiocese in dealing with instances of abuse. We have committed our full cooperation to this review.

Diocese of Sioux City Addresses Coyle Story

EMMITSBURG (IA)
Emmitsburg News

November 9, 2018

We are well aware of and understand the public, our parishioners' and victims' dismay at the information released in the Associated Press (AP) article dated October 31, 2018 regarding Jerry Coyle. We know that the AP reporter is now investigating all of our past and present actions at the Diocese of Sioux City, in order to create his next story. We are researching old records with the Review Board, an advisory board made up of lay people in the Diocese, including licensed therapists, a judge, nurses, police officers, and a psychiatrist, who advise the Bishop in his assessment of allegations of sexual abuse of minors and in his determination of suitability for ministry; offer advice on all aspects of these cases; and make recommendations they deem appropriate to reduce the risk to children.

Former Catholic school teacher accused of sexual abuse

GUAM
Guam Daily Post

November 9, 2018

By Mindy Aguon

A former Catholic school teacher has been accused of sexually abusing a student in late 2012 to 2013, according to a civil lawsuit filed against the Archdiocese of Agana and the Sisters of Mercy on Friday in the Superior Court of Guam.

Attorney David Lujan represents E.F.G., who alleges she was sexually molested and abused by a female teacher at Saint Anthony Catholic School in Tamuning. The teacher is identified only through her initials, H.J., in court documents.

Students at the school were taught to honor and respect not only the priests and nuns, but all the teachers and staff at the school, and students were told they had to do whatever they were instructed to do, the complaint states.

The plaintiff was 13 when the alleged abuse began, and it continued until she was 14. E.F.G was repeatedly sexually molested and penetrated by H.J. during the student's eighth-grade year, according to the complaint.

E.F.G. and her family looked up to H.J. as a trusted mentor and friend, based principally on the woman's elevated status in the community and school, court documents state. When the alleged abuse began, H.J. had been teaching at Saint Anthony for several years.

French bishops create commission to look into sexual abuse

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

November 8, 2018

By Claire Giangravè

After months of discussions and reflections, the French Bishops’ Conference decided to create an independent and external commission to address sexual abuse within the Church, its cover-up and the conference’s handling of the issue since the 2000s.

“The bishops of France decided to set up an independent commission to throw light on the sexual abuse of minors in the Catholic Church since 1950 to understand the reasons that favored the way in which these cases were handled and to make recommendations,” said Archbishop Georges Pontier of Marseille, President of the Conference of Bishops of France (CEF) on Nov. 7.

Pontier’s statement came at the conclusion of the bishop’s plenary assembly in Lourdes, which approved on Nov. 7 the creation of the commission and admitted to awarding a financial gesture to the victims. During the summit, the French bishops met with clerical sex abuse victims.

“This meeting between the victims and the bishops has confirmed for us all, victims and bishops, the need to work together better in this fight,” Pontier said.

Pennsylvania dioceses outline child sex abuse victim funds

HARRISBURG (PA)
Associated Press

By November 9, 2018

By Mark Scolforo

Seven Catholic dioceses in Pennsylvania said Thursday that they have taken steps to set up victim compensation funds, nearly three months after a chilling grand jury report documented decades of child sexual abuse by priests in the state.

The Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Scranton and Allentown dioceses issued public announcements, and a lawyer for the Greensburg Diocese said it is also involved. The Erie and Pittsburgh dioceses said they were setting up funds but were not ready to disclose details. Altoona-Johnstown said it set up a victim fund in 1999.

The announcements did not mention a total dollar amount for the funds or their maximum potential individual payouts.

Five of the dioceses have hired veteran compensation fund coordinator Ken Feinberg to design and operate their programs. The Philadelphia fund will begin taking applications next week, setting a filing deadline for claims at the end of next September, said Camille Biros, Feinberg’s co-administrator. Harrisburg, Erie, Greensburg and Scranton are expected to begin their programs in January, she said.

In statements, the dioceses described sources for the money, including borrowing, property sales, investments and insurers.

Bishops face highest stakes meeting since Dallas 16 years ago

NEW YORK (NY)
Crux

November 9, 2018

By Christopher White

Addressing the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) at the closely watched meeting in June 2002, as the first wave of clergy sexual abuse crisis in the U.S. reached its zenith, then-president Bishop Wilton Gregory promoted new measures of reform and accountability “in a way that ensures it will not happen again.”

Now, beginning on Monday, the U.S. bishops once again will meet to confront the painful reality that while its policies and procedures may have broken new ground, its Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People has failed to hold bishops accountable for abuse and its cover-up.

Following this summer’s wave of sexual abuse revelations - from a Pennsylvania grand jury report that chronicled seven decades of abuse of more than 1,000 victims at the hands of 300 predator priests, which has sparked over a dozen other states to launch similar reviews, to the downfall of former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick who sexually abused seminarians for decades - many Church leaders have conceded that the current crisis is the greatest test the American Catholic Church has faced in its history.

As leaders from the country’s 195 Catholic dioceses meet in Baltimore next week, there are high-stakes expectations that the U.S. bishops will enact new measures to hold bishops accountable and take new steps to restore the trust of the nation’s nearly 75 million Catholics.

Diocese of Jefferson City releases 33 names accused of sexual abuse

JEFFERSON CITY (MO)
KOMU TV

November 8, 2018

By: Savannah Rudicel & Monica Harkins & Greta Serrin

The Diocese of Jefferson City released a full list of all religious members credibly accused of sexual misconduct or abuse of a minor.

There are 33 names on the list. Only one religious brother has been criminally convicted.

Bishop W. Shawn McKnight said the diocese is committed to transparency and reducing harm.

"I am ashamed and appalled at how some of my brother bishops and priests have harmed so many," he said.

The list was derived based on procedures set by the U.S. Bishops’ Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People.

The latest case of physical sexual abuse was in 1997, according to McKnight. There have been two more cases since then. One being the inappropriate use of social media and the other, internet pornography depicting minors.

"Their actions, and the incomplete transparency we have lived under by not making all their names public, has affected the relationship of every priest, every bishop with the faithful," McKnight said.

This is, "an update to the public on work to bring greater transparency and healing for the Diocese of Jefferson City," according to a news release.

Don’t turn McCarrick into a monster, ND President says

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

By Inés San Martín

November 9, 2018

To say the least, Father John Jenkins, President of the University of Notre Dame, doesn’t seem in denial about the gravity of the clerical sexual abuse scandals that have rocked the Church in recent months.

After the Pennsylvania grand jury report was released in August, Jenkins said the revelations “are particularly searing to me and the other priests with me today, whose commitment can seem so tarnished, so soaked in filth, by those who so badly abused it.” He pledged the university “will do all we can to create a safe, nurturing environment everywhere.”

Yet befitting an Oxford-educated philosopher, Jenkins also sees complexity in the abuse crisis, including something few people want to say out loud right now: “There’s a tendency, and I don’t think it’s a helpful tendency in this kind of situation, to turn the perpetrators into monsters.”

Jenkins was speaking specifically about ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, who was forced to resign from the College of Cardinals in June following credible accusations of abuse.

Two recant, other witnesses firm in abuse charges against ‘Archangel’

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

November 9, 2018

By Claire Giangravè

Adding another layer of intrigue to the already complicated civil trial involving a Catholic lay group in Sicily, whose lay leader stands accused of sexually abusing at least ten underage girls, two of the witnesses have retracted their original statements and now say they were never raped or molested.

During a pretrial hearing, one of the witnesses said requests by the lay leader of the group to undress before him “didn’t mean anything physical,” adding that in her previous statements - when she claimed to have been sexually abused - she lied because she was frightened and her words were misunderstood.

Immigrant Communities Were The ‘Geographic Solution’ To Predator Priests

LOS ANGELES (CA)
WBHM Radio

November 8, 2018

By Aaron Schrank

The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels is the seat of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. Abuse victims in California want authorities to open a a state-wide investigation into abuse and cover-up.

Catholic Church leaders in Los Angeles for years shuffled predator priests into non-English-speaking immigrant communities. That pattern was revealed in personnel documents released in a decades-old legal settlement between victims of child sex abuse by Catholic priests and the Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

Now clergy sex abuse victims throughout California are calling on the state’s attorney general to investigate clergy abuse and force church officials to release more information about their role covering it up. The goal is to discover how wide-spread the practice of hiding abusers in immigrant communities really was.

Manuel Barragan was one of those victims.

Immigrant Communities Were The ‘Geographic Solution’ To Predator Priests

LOS ANGELES (CA)
WBHM Radio

November 8, 2018

By Aaron Schrank

The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels is the seat of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. Abuse victims in California want authorities to open a a state-wide investigation into abuse and cover-up.

Catholic Church leaders in Los Angeles for years shuffled predator priests into non-English-speaking immigrant communities. That pattern was revealed in personnel documents released in a decades-old legal settlement between victims of child sex abuse by Catholic priests and the Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

Now clergy sex abuse victims throughout California are calling on the state’s attorney general to investigate clergy abuse and force church officials to release more information about their role covering it up. The goal is to discover how wide-spread the practice of hiding abusers in immigrant communities really was.

Manuel Barragan was one of those victims.

2 priests connected to Kirksville named in diocese report

KIRKSVILLE (MO)
Kirksville Daily Express

November 9, 2018

By Jessica Karins

Two priests who served in Kirksville are among those “credibly accused” of sexual abuse of children in a list released Thursday by the Diocese of Jefferson City.

John Whiteley was accused of sexually abusing David Clohessy, now the national leader of the Survivor’s Network of those Abuse by Priests, in the 1960s and 1970s. Whiteley later worked at Mary Immaculate Church in Kirksville. Clohessy sued the diocese in 1991, but the suit was dismissed due to the statute of limitations.

One of the other accused priests is David Clohessy’s brother, Kevin Clohessy. In 1989, Kevin Clohessy became the director of the student Catholic center, Newman Center, at what is now Truman State University. Kevin Clohessy has been accused of abusing both an 18-year-old student in Kirksville and a younger boy in Jefferson City, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Clohessy was director here until 1993.

Both Whiteley and Clohessy have retired from the active priesthood; both are listed on the diocese’s list as having been “removed from ministry,” meaning they do not participate in the duties of a priest but have not been formally defrocked.

November 8, 2018

Iglesia: Ministerio Público investiga a 105 sacerdotes y 8 obispos

[Church: Public Ministry investigates 105 priests and 8 bishops]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 7, 2018

By H. Basoalto and L. Zapata

Nuevo catastro de la fiscalía, tras dos meses de indagatorias, dice que las víctimas aumentaron de 178 a 222.

Aunque en las últimas semanas las cosas han estado tranquilas en la Iglesia Católica chilena, a cinco días de una nueva asamblea plenaria de la Conferencia Episcopal, hoy se volvieron a agitar las aguas.

Philadelphia Archdiocese Will Pay Reparations to Victims of Clergy Sex Abuse

PHILADELPHA (PA)
NBC 10 TV

November 8, 2018

By Dan Stamm

Philadelphia Archbishop Charles Chaput announced a reparations fund for those sexually assaulted by Catholic clergy in Philadelphia.

The archdiocese is planning to sell off properties to fund the compensation. The total amount dedicated to payments wasn't made public.

"Money can’t buy back a wounded person’s wholeness. But what compensation can do is acknowledge the evil done," Chaput said.

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia said Thursday that it would pay financial reparations to victims of clergy sex abuse, even from years ago.

The Independent Reconciliation and Reparations effort will be funded by the archdiocese, which said it was not sure how much money would be required but that the financial commitment was "significant."

The archdiocese also announced the creation of an independent commission to review church policies, led by former U.S. Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell.

Archbishop Charles Chaput made the announcement in his weekly column Thursday. The dioceses of Harrisburg, Scranton and Allentown also announced similar programs Thursday; the Erie Diocese said it would set up a fund, but it didn't disclose any details.

Former CJ teacher loses license after being accused of sexual misconduct

DAYTON (OH)
Dayton Daily News

November 8, 2018

By Josh Sweigart

A former Chaminade Julienne Catholic High School math teacher surrendered her teaching license last year after she was accused of having an improper sexual relationship with a CJ student in the 1980s, a Dayton Daily News investigation found.

Ann E. Meyers had her license suspended as part of a settlement agreement with the Ohio Department of Education in July 2017. Under the settlement, Meyers agreed never to apply for another license from ODE.

The suspension came 10 months after the former student reported her allegations to Dayton police.

Meyers, a famed University of Dayton basketball star, did not return messages seeking comment left on her phone and at her home.

Abuse Reports in Catholic Church Up in Unprecedented Numbers

GREENSBORO (NC)
The Carolinian

November 8, 2018

Luciano Gonzalez

The Catholic Church in the United States is facing an unprecedented scandal in the months since the Pennsylvania grand jury announced the names of hundreds of priests who have abused thousands of children. Currently, at least 15 states and the District of Columbia have publicly launched or are publicly declaring that they’re preparing to launch investigations to determine the full scale of the abuse Catholic clergy subjected victims to.

Organizations such as the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP) have reported that these investigations, both the types of investigations and the scales of the investigations, are unprecedented. Each of the investigations will differ because of varying local laws that have to be taken into account, as well as the fact that each state’s Attorney General has different levels of power and access to different resources.

One of the consequences of the original Pennsylvania report that is responsible for this national conversation about abuse in the Catholic Church is that reports of sexual abuse are up all over the country. In the days following the release of the original report, more than 400 phone calls were made to the Pennsylvania hotline dedicated to reporting Catholic priest abuse of children. Other groups have acted to reveal the scope of the abuse scandal, such as a law firm that released a report naming more than 200 priests in California who were accused of sexual misconduct.

How Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry is handling clergy sex abuse allegations

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Times-Picayune

November 8, 2018

By Julia O'Donoghue

Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry is turning complaints he receives about Catholic clergy sexual misconduct over to local sheriffs, documents received through a public records request show, even as attorneys general in 13 states and the District of Columbia are actively pursuing investigations.

Landry says he doesn’t have the authority or resources to investigate the matter himself.

“If you are a victim or a legally mandated reporter, we urge you to contact your local law enforcement agency. If our office may assist anyone in connecting them to the proper agency, please call the Louisiana Bureau of Investigation at 800-256-4506,” Ruth Wisher, the attorney general’s spokeswoman, wrote in a statement Friday (Nov. 2) accompanying the release of the public records.

From Aug. 28 to Sept. 25, six individuals reached out to Landry about alleged Catholic clergy sexual abuse of minors or its coverup. Four were bringing specific cases of abuse to his office’s attention, asking for assistance or an investigation. Two others, identifying as victims, asked Landry to looking into clergy sexual abuse more broadly and volunteered to testify in court proceedings, according to the records.

Local Catholics push for release of clergy names accused with sex abuse

LOUISVILLE (KY)
WLKY TV

November 8, 2018

By Kevin Trager

The Archbishop of Louisville is promising transparency as local Catholics call for the archdiocese to release names of clergy who have faced credible accusations of child sex abuse.

Earlier this week, the archdioceses of Atlanta and Buffalo released the names of more than 50 clergy who have faced credible accusations of child sex abuse. Church officials released the names to promote transparency in the wake of a recent Pennsylvania attorney general investigation detailing decades of child sex abuse by priests in that state.

On Thursday, a local group of supporters of clergy sex abuse victims held a prayer event in front of the Cathedral of the Assumption. “The problem is so enormous prayer is probably the best thing we can do,” said Cal Pfeiffer, who joined the support group following the Boston Globe report of widespread clergy sex abuse in 2002. “It was only three months later it broke here in Louisville and if it wasn’t for the people in Boston it would still probably be covered up here.”

Archbishop of Louisville Joseph Kurtz released the following statement to WLKY:

"Catholics are angry, confused, and in pain, and I hurt with them. My heart especially goes out to victim survivors. I have received letters from those who have been abused many years ago by a priest or representative of the church. Their wounds are deep, and recent events have opened these wounds once again.

Courageous Survivor BLASTS Cardinal Timothy Dolan (video)

NEW YORK (NY)
Noaker Law Firm, LLC

October 30, 2018

Courageous survivor BLASTS Cardinal Timothy Dolan’s exclusion of victims of abuse by religious order priests and brothers from compensation or assistance from the Archdiocese of New York. Contains excerpts 10-30-2018 of press conference by survivor Lexington Filipowski and Attorney Patrick Noaker.

Noaker Law Firm represents survivors of sexual abuse in civil cases across the U.S. If you need help, call (612) 349-2735 or go to Noakerlaw.com

Persico: Victims’ compensation fund on way

ERIE (PA)
Erie Times

November 8, 2018

By Ed Palattella

Catholic Diocese of Erie says “it is finalizing the parameters of its fund” and that the recently disclosed federal probe has created an “added financial burden.”

The Catholic Diocese of Erie has announced that it remains committed to setting up a compensation fund for victims of child sexual abuse, but said details of the plan will be forthcoming.

It also said it is dealing with the creation of the fund at the same time it is working through the “added financial burden” associated with the recently disclosed federal probe of the state’s eight Roman Catholic dioceses.

The diocese issued its announcement on the fund on Thursday, as other dioceses throughout the state released details about how their compensation funds will operate.

French Bishops launch 'independent' commission on sex abuse in Catholic Church

FRANCE
CNN

November 8, 2018

By Euan McKirdy

French bishops have announced plans to establish an "independent" commission to look into the sexual abuse of minors within the Catholic Church dating back as far as 1950.

The appointed panel would "seek to understand the reasons which led to the way these cases were handled" by the Church, the Conference of French Bishops said in a statement on Wednesday.

The conference pledged to publish a report outlining the commission's findings within two years. Details, including the name of the person spearheading the investigation, will be announced in the coming days, it added.

The statement came as French bishops held their plenary assembly in the holy French city of Lourdes, where they received a support from Pope Francis, according to Vatican News.

In the message, signed by the Cardinal Secretary of State, Pietro Parolin, the Pope encouraged the bishops to "continue to implement a 'zero tolerance' stance against sexual abuse committed by members of the Church."

Diocese Of Youngstown Makes Ultimate Confession

YOUNGSTOWN (OH)
Jambar

November 7, 2018

By Alyssa Weston and John Stran

Bishop George Murry of the Youngstown Catholic Diocese released the names of 31 Youngstown priests; two religious clergy members and one non-clergy member from a religious order who were removed from the clergy over credible sexual misconduct allegations on Oct. 30.

According to Murry, these priests were put on the credible accusations list after a thorough investigation and review of available information, from the diocesan review board, proved the sexual abuse claims to be more true than not.

Murry said the review board includes a psychologist, the chair of the Mahoning County Board of Children Services, two attorneys, a medical doctor, the Dean of Youngstown State University’s Health and Human Services Department, a Trumbull County children services member and director, two pastors and a parent.

“We take a look at the allegations and work with a private investigation firm made up of former FBI agents,” Murry said. “We investigate every claim that comes to us and [the FBI agents] make a recommendation to us about whether or not the allegation is credible.”

DC priest arrested on charges of child sexual abuse

WASHINGTON (DC)
WTOP

November 7, 2018

By Abigail Constantino

D.C. police have arrested a Catholic priest on charges of child sexual abuse.

Urbano Vazquez, 46, of Northeast D.C., was arrested Wednesday following allegations of sexual abuse. Vazquez has been the parochial vicar at the Shrine of the Sacred Heart Parish in Columbia Heights since 2014.

Police said in a news release that Vazquez had sexual contact with a child without permission in May 2015.

The victim was 13 years old at the time of the alleged abuse, and the suspect was 42 years old. She said in a statement to police that Vazquez placed his hand down the front of her shirt and onto her bare breast on two occasions.

Jim Jordan Will Run For Minority Leader Despite Ohio State Sexual Assault Scandal

COLUMBUS (OH)
The Huffington Post

November 7, 2018

By Andy Campbell

Jordan is accused of ignoring sexual abuse allegations against the OSU team doctor.

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), an ultraconservative whose re-election campaign was dogged by accusations that he ignored sexual abuse while he was an assistant coach at Ohio State University, on Wednesday announced his bid for House minority leader.

Hours after his midterm election victory for a seventh term representing Ohio’s 4th Congressional District ― and after Democrats won control of the House ― Jordan told The Hill that he’ll challenge Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) for the leadership spot.

“I plan to run for minority leader,” said Jordan. “In 2016, the American people elected Republicans to come here and change this town. I think the president is doing just that, but I don’t think they see the same intensity from folks in Congress, folks in the House of Representatives. ... Have we replaced Obamacare yet? Have we secured the border yet? Have we reformed welfare yet? No.”

Jordan was publicly accused in July of inaction at Ohio State while the team doctor sexually abused dozens of athletes in the late 1980s and early ’90s. At least 145 people have accused Dr. Richard Strauss, who died by suicide in 2005, of sexual assault.

Jordan has repeatedly denied he knew about Strauss’s actions, but a former OSU athlete, Dunyasha Yetts, told NBC News in July that he personally told Jordan that Strauss attempted to pull down his shorts during what was supposed to be an examination of his thumb.

What Should USA Gymnastics' New Governing Body Look Like? Survivors, Former Athletes Have Ideas

UNITED STATES
Sports Illustrated

November 7, 2018

By Lauren Green

The calls to decertify USA Gymnastics began in earnest as the Larry Nassar case unfolded and only got louder as victims came forward, new information about those involved came to light, and the organization continued to stumble.

With Monday’s call from the USOC starting the decertification process, questions are arising about what this new national governing body for gymnastics should look like. What kind of leadership should this new organization have? Should this person come from a gymnastics background or be completely outside of the community? What are the programs or policies that need to be in place?

Both survivors and former athletes were adamant that the person or a member of the group in charge needs to be someone who knows gymnastics and understands the sport and its history. They pointed to the fact that both Steve Penny and Kerry Perry came from marketing backgrounds—and look how that turned out.

“It’s going to be important that it’s someone who understands the world of elite gymnastics,” Rachael Denhollander said in a telephone interview. “They can identify abusive coaching structures, they can know how cleverly [the structures] can be masked, they can know what’s normal and what’s not normal.”

The bigger question might come with what type of leadership should be put into place. In the past, there was a CEO/president and a board of directors. But perhaps now, a better solution might be to appoint more than one person, to limit the amount of power given to one individual.

“I think a committee would be best because when you have more than one person, I think you have some checks and balances,” Sister survivor Emily Meinke said. “If you appoint one person then, as we’ve seen, they have free reign to do whatever they want. Even if there is someone bringing something to their attention, they have the authority to just shut it down.”

USOC under pressure to fix USA Gymnastics before Tokyo 2020

UNITED STATES
Reuters

November 7, 2018

By Frank Pingue and Jonathan Allen

Like a world-class gymnast, the United States Olympic Committee(USOC) needs to nail a perfect landing to put a damaging sexual abuse scandal behind it ahead of the 2020 Games in Tokyo, sports sponsorship experts said.

The USOC's announcement this week that it would seek to revoke the status of USA Gymnastics as the national governing body for the sport reflects pressure from fans, athletes and sponsors for a lasting solution for the scandal-plagued organization.

"If the USOC didn't take this step now, then they would have had somewhat of a revolt on their hands from athletes and fans," said Jim Andrews, an independent sponsorship consultant.

USA Gymnastics has been in turmoil since dozens of female gymnasts, including Olympic champions such as Simone Biles, came forward to accuse former team doctor Larry Nassar of sexual abuse. Nassar was sentenced in February to up to 125 years in prison after some 200 women testified about decades of abuse at his hands.

The U.S. gymnastics team performed well at the world championships in Doha, Qatar, that ended on Sunday, with Biles becoming the first female gymnast in 30 years to claim a medal in all six events at a major competition.

The team's success meant a solution was not required immediately, Andrews said, but was vital to bring back lost sponsors and fans.

33 Priests 'Credibly Accused' of Sexually Abusing Minors in Missouri

JEFFERSON CITY (MO)
Associated Press

November 8, 2018

By Summer Ballentine

Thirty-three priests or religious brothers in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Jefferson City, Missouri, have been “credibly accused” and/or removed from the ministry over sexual abuse of minors, the bishop of the central Missouri diocese said Thursday.

Bishop W. Shawn McKnight released a complete list of the names that followed an internal investigation begun in February. The list includes 25 priests from the diocese, three priests from other areas who previously served in the Jefferson City diocese, and five members of a religious order.

Fourteen of the 33 men named are dead. Many of them are elderly. The diocese said the most recent case of physical sexual abuse found in the investigation occurred in 1997.

Jefferson City Diocese releases names of 33 accused of sex abuse

JEFFERSON CITY (MO)
KMIZ TV

November 8, 2018

By Barry Mangold and Matthew Sanders

A Catholic bishop on Thursday released a name of clergy and others in the Catholic Church who once served in the Jefferson City Diocese and have been credibly accused of sexually abusing children.

The list of 33 names also includes those who were removed from the Jefferson City Diocese ministry because of concern for youth safety.

Only one has been criminally convicted, the diocese said in a news release. The release of the names coincided with a 1 p.m. news conference on the subject.

Click here to view the full list.

Bishop Shawn McKnight in the release said an independent review of files showed no priest, deacon or religious leader now in the diocese as ever been accused of child sexual abuse. McKnight said the diocese has spent $4.7 million on the issue since 2003. That compares to $1.5 million spent between 1956, the inception of the diocese, and June 30, 2003.

"All of these men are either deceased or formally removed from the ministry of the diocese," McKnight said at the news conference.

Philadelphia Archdiocese Creates Compensation Fund For Clergy Sex Abuse Victims

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
CBS Channel 3

November 8, 2018

Pennsylvania’s Roman Catholic dioceses are starting to announce details about victim compensation funds they’re setting up, nearly three months after a sweeping grand jury report documented decades of child sexual abuse by priests in the state.

The archdiocese of Philadelphia and the dioceses of Harrisburg, Scranton and Allentown on Thursday disclosed some information. The Erie Diocese says it’s setting up a fund, but isn’t ready to disclose details.

The announcements don’t mention a total dollar amount or maximum individual payout.

In statements, the dioceses describe sources for the money, including borrowing, property sales, investments and insurers.

Clergy willingly divulge information to protect the vulnerable — except in priest misconduct cases, says UB law expert

BUFFALO (NY)
University at Buffalo News

By Charles Anzalone

November 8, 2018

When University at Buffalo law professor Christine Pedigo Bartholomew studied “clergy privilege” — the legal rule shielding confidential communications of priests and clergy — she found priests often recast communications to make them fall outside this testimonial protection.

Clerics often wanted to divulge information concerning such sensitive encounters as people confessing to crimes, says Bartholomew. The clergy wanted to do the right thing, she says, and help the courts’ search for justice.

But something happened when it came to accusations of sexual abuse, according to Bartholomew’s extensive, comprehensive review of cases from the early 1800s to 2016 — the first time a legal scholar has reviewed and recorded every opinion on clergy privilege during that time.

Where otherwise forthcoming priests tried to find ways to divulge what they knew to law enforcement officials, they did the opposite.

Diocese of Scranton announces a "Compensation Program"

SCRANTON (PA)
WBRE/WYOU-TV

November 8, 2018

By Jayne Ann Bugda

The Diocese of Scranton announces a "Compensation Program" for Survivors of Sexual Abuse.

Officials announced Thursday the creation of an "Independent Survivors Compensation Program."

It's aimed at those who suffered sexual abuse by clergy.. religious.. or lay employees.

The diocese says it will be administered by two leading experts in mediation and alternative dispute resolution.

An independent oversight committee will oversee the program. The diocese will have no authority over the committee.

It comes after a grand jury report identifying 300 predator priests state wide, who reportedly abused children over seven decades.

Francis on the ropes

LONDON (UK)
The Economist

November 9, 2018

As an FBI agent for 29 years, Philip Scala led the operation that jailed John Gotti of Cosa Nostra and raided an al-Qaeda bomb factory. Mr Scala, now a private investigator, took on Hells Angels, rioting prisoners and Russian mobsters. Next on his list? The cardinals of the Roman Catholic church.

A new lay group, Better Church Governance (bcg), has hired Mr Scala to probe the lives of the 224 men who advise Pope Francis (including their sex lives, if any). His particular focus will be the 124 who, were the pontiff to die tomorrow, would elect his successor. Mr Scala’s team of up to ten investigators will publish their findings on a website, alongside carefully screened information from the public. Philip Nielsen, bcg’s executive director, hopes the website, dubbed the Red Hat Report after the scarlet zucchetti (skullcaps) worn by cardinals, will be online within a month.

Did California launch its own Catholic priest sex abuse investigation?

SAN JOSE (CA)
Bay Area News Group

November 8, 2018

By Matthias Gafni

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced Wednesday that his office will begin collecting reports from California residents about clergy sex abuse, a likely first step in the state opening an investigation of Catholic priest abuse similar to a scathing grand jury probe in Pennsylvania earlier this year.

Becerra’s office created a website page devoted to clergy abuse, asking anyone who has been a victim of sexual abuse or has information regarding sexual misconduct by clergy members to fill out an online complaint form or email ClergyAbuse@doj.ca.gov.

“In light of the news surrounding the sexual abuse of children by members of clergy or religious organizations across the country, the Department of Justice is gathering information from the public regarding complaints of this nature in California,” according to the website.

Diocese of Harrisburg announce victim’s compensation fund from clergy abuse scandal

DAUPHIN COUNTY (PA)
Fox 43 News

November 8, 2018

By Cale Ahearn

The Diocese of Harrisburg has announced a victim’s compensation fund from the clergy abuse scandal.

Below is the statement from Bishop Gainer:
“As we announced in September, my Brother Bishops and I are working together to honor the commitment to provide compensation to those who have been abused by clergy. Each Diocese is working through its own process to help the survivors of clergy sexual abuse.

“To that end, I am announcing that the Diocese of Harrisburg is moving forward with developing a Survivors’ Compensation Program. The program will be operational early next year and will be led by attorney Kenneth Feinberg, along with his colleague Camille Biros. Mr. Feinberg has specialized in administering similar types of victims programs, including the successful Independent Reconciliation and Compensation fund for the Archdiocese of New York, and the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, among many other notable compensation funds across the nation. It is my sincere hope that this program will help to enhance and increase our already ongoing efforts to assist the survivors of child sexual abuse. As more details regarding our plan become finalized, we will be releasing them to the public.

Defrocked priest, accused of sexual abuse, has his book shelved

NEW YORK (NY)
Irish Central

November 8, 2018

By Paddy Clancy

A self-published book by a defrocked priest from the diocese of Cloyne, in which he claims the Catholic Church violated his human rights when it found him guilty of sexually abusing children, was temporarily withdrawn from sale last weekend.

AuthorHouse, an American so-called vanity publisher, said In the Shelter of the Most High by Daniel Duane, 80, had been put “on hold temporarily” to facilitate amendments he wanted to make.

Bishop William Crean of Cloyne consulted the diocese’s lawyers about the book and alerted the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) in the Vatican to its publication.

A spokesperson for the Diocese of Cloyne said, “The diocese is concerned about this book because of the power of the impact on victims.”

SNAP Network on ‘Hail Mary’ Film: Upcoming film that may be of interest to survivor community

NEW DELHI (INDIA)
GCCurrentAffairs

November 8, 2018

The Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP) – a globally recognised organisation championing the fight against sexual abuse by priests – in a tweet today shared its views on Arihan Pictures film project ‘Hail Mary’.

In tweet @SNAPnetwork stated, “Upcoming film that may be of interest to the survivor community”.

The Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), which was featured heavily in Spotlight, 2016’s Academy Award winner for Best Picture is a global organisation working on its mission statement, “Our most powerful tool is the light of truth. Through our actions, we bring healing, prevention and justice”

The makers of Hail Mary plan on distributing printable fact sheets that will promote the film, while educating the public about the issue. Additionally, Team Hail Mary will ask its online followers to show support by putting their movie stubs in church collection baskets to send a loud message, without making much noise.

Goa-based Savio Rodrigues owned Arihan Pictures in collaboration with South Indian filmmaker R. Joseph Kennedy have started pre-production work on their ambitious project ‘Hail Mary’.

California AG begins gathering information on clergy sexual abuse, SNAP applauds the move

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

November 8, 2018

California's attorney general announced today that he is soliciting complaints and information regarding incidents of sexual misconduct by clergy members. SNAP applauds this important development.

We are grateful that Attorney General Xavier Becerra has followed in the footsteps of twenty of his colleagues across the nation and taken the first step towards an investigation of clergy sexual abuse in California. We hope that Mr. Becerra’s office will also open a confidential hotline, in addition to the complaint form and email address provided.

SNAP is also delighted that, like the investigation already underway in Florida, Mr. Becerra is not limiting his information gathering to one specific faith community. While our organization may have its roots in the abuse that took place, and is still taking place, in the Catholic Church, years of experience working with survivors has shown us that no religious group is free from this scourge.

As of this writing, 19 other states and Washington D.C. have begun investigations. We hope that this action in California will encourage attorneys general who have yet to open their own investigation to consider doing so. SNAP believes that independent investigations by law enforcement are the best way to help survivors heal, promote justice, and begin developing prevention strategies for the future.

Priest charged with sexual battery may have groomed minor

ATHENS (OH)
Athens Post

November 7, 2018

Authorities are concerned whether or not a Catholic priest charged last week with eight counts of sexual battery was appropriately punished last November by the Diocese of Steubenville after he took a now-pregnant 17-year-old to a wedding, according to The Associated Press.

Henry Christopher Foxhoven, 45, of Glouster, was suspended from the ministry on Oct. 27, Bishop Jeffrey Monforton said in a Diocese of Steubenville news release. Foxhoven was charged on Oct. 30.

The Athens County Prosecutor's Office received a call from an out-of-town wedding guest at the reception last year who said she witnessed Foxhoven inappropriately touching the girl, Athens County Prosecutor Keller Blackburn said in an interview with the Associated Press.

“The case remains under investigation,” Blackburn said. “It’s possible additional charges could be presented to a grand jury.”

The Diocese of Steubenville sent a letter to Blackburn’s office this past week that said when it learned in November 2017 about the wedding incident, it suspended Foxhoven for a week and ordered the priest to receive counseling for boundary issues.

'Groomed' for rape: sexual abuse by pastors back in spotlight

KOREA
Korea Times

November 8, 2018

By Lee Suh-yoon

Recent allegations that a 35-year-old pastor sexually abused at least 26 teenage girls in his youth ministry group have refueled the debate over the manipulative tactics of sex offenders in the clergy.

On Tuesday, four of the alleged victims — masked and covered in black — spoke out against a pastor at their church in Incheon, claiming he "groomed" them into accommodating his sexual demands for years in their teens.

"Every time I said no, he told me he loved me, saying it was the first time he felt this way about someone," one of the victims said at a press conference held at a Christian meeting hall in Yeonji-dong, Seoul. "I trusted the pastor, so I never thought he could lie in God's name."

The pastor, surnamed Kim, approached young female students in the youth ministry of his church, buying them treats and gently counseling them on family issues. As the girls started to trust him more, Kim started making sexual comments or touching them. He convinced the girls they were in loving relationships that would eventually end in marriage. Gradually, he got them to have sex with him regularly, telling them he wanted to "purify" bad memories of being raped by his uncle.

"It was hard for the victims to even register their situation as sexual abuse while they were stuck in the continuous cycle of psychological brainwashing and rape," Chae Su-ji, head of the Christian Counseling Center for Violence Against Women, told The Korea Times, Wednesday.

"As the relationship deepens and the young person is forced to keep secrets, she is increasingly isolated from others, making it easier for the pastor to psychologically control her."

Non-profit organization calls for change in laws requiring clergy to report sex abuse

SALT LAKE CITY (UT)
Channel 13 News

November 7, 2018

By Amanda Gerry

Utah legislators woke up from election night Wednesday morning to a release calling on a change in laws involving the sanctity of the communication between a clergy member and those who may seek forgiveness.

"We want all religions to be more transparent, in terms of their finances, in terms of their corporate policies and procedures, and in terms of their internal statistics on sex abuse," said Ryan McKnight, executive director of the Truth and Transparency Foundation.

The Truth and Transparency Foundation, a non-profit organization that operates the websites MormonLeaks and FaithLeaks, sent a release to Utah legislators this morning calling on a change in state laws that exempt clergy from being forced to report instances of child abuse.

"While it may not prevent all wrong doing," McKnight said, "it helps in trying to achieve as little wrong doing as possible."

In the release, the organization states they have published documents that "show that clergy typically and intentionally avoid reporting abuse to law enforcement except in states where they are required to do so."

Atlanta Archdiocese releases list of those ‘credibly’ accused of abuse

ATLANTA (GA)
Atlanta Journal-Constitution

November 7, 2018

By Shelia M. Poole

The Archdiocese of Atlanta has released the names of 15 priests, seminarians, and those under direct authority of a religious order “credibly” accused of sexual abuse of a minor.
The list, which was released Tuesday, is available on the archdiocese’s website (archatl.com/offices/child-and-youth-protection/list/).

Archbishop Wilton D. Gregory said in the document that he released the names “in the spirit of transparency and the hope of continued healing for the survivors of abuse.”

The Roman Catholic Church has been reeling from a damning Pennsylvania grand jury report released this summer that outlined decades of sexual abuse by priests and cover-ups by church authorities.

Since then, Catholics have demanded accountability, transparency and, in some cases, resignations or criminal charges. Experts say other dioceses or archdioceses across the nation have also been releasing more information about priests accused of sexual abuse.

State authorities ask potential molestation victims of clergy members to come forward

SAN DIEGO (CA)
San Diego Union-Tribune

November 7, 2018

By Alene Tchekmedyian

State authorities are asking people who believe they have been sexually abused by clergy members in California to come forward with information.

The plea comes after several Roman Catholic dioceses across the state released the names, in some cases for the first time, of priests accused of sexual misconduct.

“In light of the news surrounding the sexual abuse of children by members of clergy or religious organizations across the country, the Department of Justice is gathering information from the public regarding complaints of this nature in California,” state Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra’s office said in a statement.

Last month, the Roman Catholic Diocese of San Jose released the names of 15 priests who worked in Santa Clara County and were accused of sexually abusing children. Of them, nine are dead and the rest have been banned from the ministry. Four of the men had been convicted of sex crimes.

Argentina’s bishops tell Pope Francis they’ve got his back

DENVER (CO)
Crux

November 8, 2018

By Inés San Martín

Near the end of a troubling year in Pope Francis’s home country, the bishops of Argentina have expressed their support for the pontiff, claiming the Church and its leader have never been under attack, both at home and abroad as they are right now.

Bishop Oscar Ojea, president of the Argentine bishops’ conference, said these attacks even come from inside the institution. Speaking about the country’s general situation, he warned that the “social and economic crisis hitting the entire Argentine people is beginning to erode trust in political leadership, increasing a social bad mood, the anger and intolerance which makes coexistence very tough.”

“We’re closing an extremely difficult year,” Ojea said. “Many events that we’ve lived in recent months have provoked perplexity, and at the same time present us with great pastoral challenges that need to be illuminated by the light of the Gospel.”

“They’re complex and conflictual situations, that hide a message we still have to discover,” he said, before ticking off developments such as a national debate for the legalization of abortion, where even Catholic schools and communities had people supporting an abortion legalization bill that, in the end, didn’t get a greenlight in Congress.

Following that, there was an organized, en masse apostacy, with thousands of Argentinians officially renouncing their Catholic faith; allegations of clerical sexual abuse that “increase the pain at the deepest part of the Church’s heart; attacks against the person of the pope, from inside and outside the Church, which leads to a scarce transmission of his message.”

[Though Ojea didn’t specify it, he was likely referring to sensational accusations from a former papal ambassador in the U.S. that Pope Francis knew about sexual misconduct concerns regarding ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick in 2013 and covered them up.]

Crimes by clergy should be prosecuted

YOUNGSTOWN (OH)
Youngstown Tribune

November 8, 2018

It is clear to us that although knowledge of “credible” accusations of sexual abuse within the Youngstown Catholic Diocese existed for decades, church leaders decided among themselves that it would be preferable to handle these issues in-house rather than calling for outside criminal investigations. They chose to settle many of the cases quietly, some with the exchange of cash. In fact, since 1943, there have been settlements totalling $500,000 paid to victims of sexual abuse.

Youngstown Diocese Bishop George Murry released the list in recent weeks of 31 clergy whom he said have been credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors. About 12 of those men now are deceased.

This practice of settling claims without criminal prosecution apparently was common not just in our diocese, but in other Catholic dioceses nationwide.

Now the diocese is making an attempt to come clean by releasing the names of the accused clergy who have been named in credible accusations since this diocese was created in 1943. In some cases where the alleged abusers are not deceased, the statute of limitations has expired, meaning these men probably never will face judgment in a court of law.

Murry said he is not aware of any pending criminal charges relating to the sexual abuse. He attempted to justify the church’s decision not to seek prosecution by saying the victims did not want to be made public.

University panels ask how church should emerge from abuse crisis

NEW YORK (NY)
National Catholic Reporter

November 8, 2018

by Peter Feuerherd

What now?

Toward the end of a year marked by revelations about worldwide sex abuse, from Chile, Australia, Germany, Guam, as well as Pennsylvania and New Jersey, the question of how the church should emerge from crisis was the topic in two seminars at East Coast Jesuit universities within a week of each other.

At Fordham University here, as well as Georgetown University in Washington, experts in church life and psychology offered possible pathways out, after describing the depths of the issues which confront the church.

"We have lost trust," Justice Anne Burke of the Illinois Supreme Court and former chair of the U.S. Bishops' Review Board, told the Georgetown gathering Oct. 24. "There is no accountability," she said about the bishops, noting that the 2002 Dallas Charter, which created a zero-tolerance policy for priest sex abusers, never applied to them.

Ex-priest on list of ‘credible allegations’ of sexual abuse of minor

GAINESVILLE (GA)
The Gainesville Times

November 7, 2018.

A priest who worked at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Gainesville for roughly six years is on a list released by the Archdiocese of Atlanta regarding members of the clergy “credibly accused of sexual abuse of a minor.”

The archdiocese released the list Tuesday, Nov. 6, and included 15 names of “priests, deacons, seminarians” and others affiliated with the Atlanta diocese since its establishment in 1956.

On the list is Jorge Cristancho, who was ordained in May 1978. Under his places of service, St. Michael’s appears from 1996-2001. In 2001, he served at St. George Catholic Church in Newnan.

Cristancho was permanently removed from the ministry in 2003.

Indian diocese will not fund defense for bishop accused of rape

JALANDHAR (INDIA)
Catholic News Agency

November 8, 2018

The Diocese of Jalandhar will not pay for the criminal defense of its bishop, who is accused of serially raping a religious sister.

Bishop Agnelo Gracias, who was appointed Sept. 20 by Pope Francis as interim leader of the Indian diocese, told reporters Nov. 6 that Bishop Franco Mulakkal’s brother has been paying for the bishop’s legal expenses.

“His family back home is quite well off. So, no request has come to us from his side,” Gracias said Nov. 6, adding that the diocese would consider providing financial support to Mulakkal’s accuser if she requested it.

Mulakkal, who remains head of the Diocese of Jalandhar but was sidelined by the appointment of Gracias, was arrested Sept. 21. He is suspected of having raped a member of the Missionaries of Jesus more than a dozen times during a two year period that began May 5, 2014.

Catholic priest arrested on sexual abuse charge at District church

WASHINGTON (DC)
Washington Post

November 7, 2018

By Clarence Williams and Julie Zauzmer

D.C. police arrested a priest from a Northwest Washington Catholic Church on Wednesday on charges that he sexually abused a teenager at the parish in 2015, officials said.

Urbano Vazquez, 46, of Northeast Washington was charged with second-degree child sexual abuse in connection with an incident at the Shrine of the Sacred Heart in May of that year.

According to a D.C. police report, a 13-year-old girl told police that Vasquez put his hand down her shirt on two occasions on her bare skin. Vazquez was identified as a “pastor of that church that abuse occurred at,” the police report said.

The Shrine of the Sacred Heart is located at 3211 Sacred Heart Way NW. Vasquez is identified on the church website as Fr. Urbano Vazquez, a parochial vicar.

Abuse survivors: 'Blue wave' couldn't come soon enough

NEW YORK (NY)
WNYT TV

November 7, 2018

A "blue wave" has come to the state Capitol. Democratic victories could clear the way for more liberal priorities like election reform and universal health care.

Another issue that's been stalled in the Senate for years -- giving molestation victims more time to sue their abusers.

To say that child sex abuse survivors are pleased with the outcome of Tuesday's election is a gross understatement. Quite frankly, they are euphoric.

Abuse victims and their advocates have been crusading for more than a decade to extend the statute of limitations to report child sex abuse. Currently in New York state, they only have until they're 23 years old. However, for many reasons they are unable to meet the deadline.

Spiritual Abuse: When People Tell You, “No Church is Perfect”

OREGON
Spiritual Sounding Board

November 1, 2018

Being hurt at church is tough, and sometimes it’s a lonely journey. You may have experienced something that other congregants have not experienced. Some people may have good intentions, but say things that are not helpful, and in fact, may be hurtful. This can lead to more isolation as you don’t know who is safe to talk to. This can lead hurt people to stay away from church entirely.

One of the most confusing things about spiritual abuse is that not everyone is able to identify spiritual abuse. I remember dropping hints to people seeing if they would acknowledge my experiences or even add to them. Thankfully, many did, and I didn’t feel alone.

I posted an old article by Jonathan Hollingsworth, What Not to Say to Someone Who’s Been Hurt by the Church, on Twitter and the SSB Facebook page which seems to have resonated with a lot of people. I thought it might be a good idea to discuss these unhelpful statements one by one here, and give people the opportunity to share their experiences.

New Catholic priest abuse reports test legacies of archbishops Joseph Rummel, Philip Hannan

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Times-Picayune

November 8, 2018

By Drew Broach

As the rain ceased and the skies cleared on the afternoon of Sept. 12, 1987, the world leader of Roman Catholicism stepped to the altar of a canopied pavilion at the University of New Orleans and, before 130,000 sweltering faithful, raised the body of Christ during communion. Standing just behind and to the right of Pope John Paul II was the concelebrant of the outdoor Mass, Archbishop Philip Hannan, who would later recall the pontiff’s three-day visit to his city as the apogee of his 24-year episcopate.

Hannan died in 2011, a tough, colorful prelate who not only scored the coup of a papal visit but more broadly was revered as the architect of a sprawling network of new social services for poor people, elderly people and immigrants in southeast Louisiana.

Now, however, Hannan’s legacy – and that of one of his predecessors, Joseph Rummel, the longest-serving archbishop in New Orleans history -- is coming under new scrutiny, the result of changing societal values and of a belated effort by the Catholic Church, especially in the United States, to come clean about its history of pedophile priests and its institutional coverup of their misbehavior.

November 7, 2018

DC Priest Accused of Sexually Abusing Teenage Girl

WASHINGTON (DC)
NBC News 4 TV

November 7, 2018

By Gina Cook

A Catholic priest has been accused of abusing a child inside a church in Northwest D.C. and the archdiocese says it has removed another priest from the church for not taking proper actions in reporting the alleged abuse.

Urbano Vazquez, 46, was arrested Wednesday and charged with second-degree child sexual abuse. Vazquez has worked at Shrine of the Sacred Heart in D.C.'s Columbia Heights neighborhood since 2014, according to the Archdiocese of Washington.

A victim told police that Vazquez put his hand down her shirt and touched her breast two different times at Sacred Heart. She said the abuse happened in 2015, when she was 13.

"Since the initial claim to police, additional allegations against Father Vazquez were reported," the Archdiocese of Washington said in a lengthy statement Wednesday night.

Brownwood pastor indicted for continuous sexual abuse of children

BROWNWOOD (TX)
KTXS TV

November 5, 2018

by Nicholas Teresky

A pastor from Brownwood was indicted by a Brown County grand jury last month for the continuous sexual abuse of children.

Fernando Hernandez, 50, of Brownwood, was indicted on October 25 on a charge of continuous sexual abuse of children.

Hernandez, the pastor at the It's A Challenge Church of Brownwood, is accused of sexually abusing four children between August of 2010 and July of 2018.

Hernandez was arrested twice in a span of less than a week for child sex offenses in late July and early August.

Waterbury priest accused of sexual abuse

WATERBURY (CT)
WFSB TV

November 7, 2018

A Connecticut priest is being accused of sexual abuse.

A New Haven attorney sent out a letter saying a complaint has been filed against the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Hartford and the Corporation of the Church of the Blessed Sacrament and Blessed Sacrament Church in Waterbury.

The paperwork names Father Walter Vichas and alleges that Kevin DiStasio and his family were parishioners of Blessed Sacrament Church.

Between 1979 and 1980, DiStasio served as an altar boy.

The suit alleges, prior to the early morning mass, while the plaintiff was putting on his altar boy vestments in the sacristy, Vichas sexually assaulted, sexually abused and sexually exploited the plaintiff.

The lawsuit claims compensation for psychological damages.

A news conference will be held on Friday at 10 a.m. about the claims.

Defense asks for priest's release on abuse charges

RAPID CITY (SD)
KFGO TV

November 7, 2018

A defense attorney for a Rapid City priest accused of sexual abuse has asked a judge to release the defendant to the supervision of Catholic diocese at Casa Maria.

But, prosecutors Tuesday objected to the release and asked the judge to continue John Praveen's $100,000 bond. Defense attorney John Murphy says Praveen would be monitored at the diocese property near Piedmont for retired priests.

The 38-year-old priest is accused of sexually abusing a 13-year-old child. KOTA-TV reports Deputy State's Attorney Kelsey Weber says Praveen presents a flight risk because he has few ties to the community. Seventh Circuit Judge Robert Mandel did not immediately rule on the defense request.

Praveen most recently worked at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Rapid City.

Bombshell documents name Catholic priests, deacons accused of abusing minors

ATLANTA (GA)
WSB TV

November 7, 2018

By Tom Regan

The Catholic archbishop of Atlanta has released bombshell documents naming over a dozen priests and deacons in the Atlanta metro area accused of sexually abusing minors.

Channel 2's Tom Regan went to the Cathedral of Christ the King, where two of the priests on the list once served.

Regan spoke to a victim, who said he was abused by one of those priests as a teenager.

The victim, who didn't want to be identified, said the church never took his complaint seriously.

We're hearing from a victim and getting reaction from the Catholic community in Atlanta, for Channel 2 Action News at 6 p.m.

Catholic agencies closely monitor giving after clergy sex abuse shock

WASHINGTON (DC)
Catholic News Service

November 7, 2018

By Dennis Sadowski

Leaders and fundraisers at Catholic organizations are cautiously monitoring the level of donations and gifts as the end-of-the-year giving season approaches, hoping that the clergy sexual abuse scandal won’t negatively affect their bottom line.

While most of the professionals contacted by Catholic News Service said it is too early yet to see what effect, if any, the abuse crisis may have on giving, some are taking steps to reassure donors that money contributed to vital ministries is not going for settlements to abuse victims or payments to attorneys.

The crisis is just one factor that concerns the leaders. There’s also the 2017 Tax Cut and Jobs Act. It’s effect on giving remains a question mark. “People remain confused about it,” said Franciscan Sister Georgette Lehmuth, president and CEO of the National Catholic Development Conference.

“The main thing is no one knows. It’s way too early,” Patrick Markey, executive director of the Diocesan Fiscal Management Conference, told CNS.

French bishops set up 'independent' panel into child sex abuse

PARIS (FRANCE)
AlJazeera

November 7, 2018

French bishops have announced setting up an "independent" commission to "shed light on the sexual abuse of minors in the Catholic church since 1950".

In a statement released on Wednesday, the Bishops' Conference of France (CEF) said the panel would seek "to understand the reasons which led to the way these affairs were handled" and make recommendations.

This commission also aims to evaluate the measures taken by the Conference of Bishops of France since the 2000s, and it would draw up a report within two years.

The Vatican has been shaken by a string of paedophile scandals committed by clergy in Australia, Europe, North and South America.

Buffalo bishop responds to criticism, says he has no plans to resign

CHEEKTOWAGA (NY)
Catholic News Service

November 7, 2018

Buffalo Bishop Richard J. Malone told reporters at a news conference he held Nov. 5 outside Infant of Prague Church in Cheektowaga that at a meeting earlier in the day with the diocese’s priests, two of them had asked him to resign.

The bishop acknowledged ongoing criticism over his handling of some clergy abuse complaints but said he has no plans to resign.

“I know that there may not be a high level of trust right now, but I do believe that working with others who continue to believe in me, we can steer through this storm into a calm sea,” said Bishop Malone, who has headed the Buffalo Diocese since August 2012.

The day of the news conference the diocese added 36 names to a public list of priests with substantiated claims of sexual abuse of a child, bringing the number to 78.

Guam Catholic church to file bankruptcy amid abuse lawsuits

GUAM
The Associated Press

November 7, 2018

By Caleb Jones and Grace Garces Bordallo

Guam’s Catholic church will file for bankruptcy — a move that will allow the archdiocese to avoid trial in dozens of lawsuits alleging child sexual abuse by priests and move toward settlements.

Archbishop Michael Byrnes announced Wednesday that mediation efforts that began in September led the church to bankruptcy.

“This path will bring the greatest measure of justice to the greatest number of victims,” Byrnes said. “That’s the heart of what we’re doing.”

Byrnes said the bankruptcy will provide “finality for victim survivors that they’ve been heard and understood.”

Attorney Leander James, who is working with alleged victims in Guam, said in a statement the move will help resolve current lawsuits from more than 180 claims of abuse through settlements.

“We welcome the announcement,” James said in a statement. “Bankruptcy provides the only realistic path to settlement of pending and future claims.”

James says the bankruptcy will create a deadline for victims to file claims.

Waterbury priest accused of sexual abuse

WATERBURY (CT)
WFSB

November 7, 2018

A Connecticut priest is being accused of sexual abuse.

A New Haven attorney sent out a letter saying a complaint has been filed against the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Hartford and the Corporation of the Church of the Blessed Sacrament and Blessed Sacrament Church in Waterbury.

The paperwork names Father Walter Vichas and alleges that Kevin DiStasio and his family were parishioners of Blessed Sacrament Church.

Between 1979 and 1980, DiStasio served as an altar boy.

Why Catholic sex abuse survivors don't trust Archbishop Joseph Kurtz

LOUISVILLE (KY)
Courier Journal

November 7, 2018

By Caitlin McGlade

Two senior Catholic officials who remained silent decades ago when priests were accused of sexually abusing Louisville children have been kept in power — and even promoted — on Archbishop Joseph Kurtz's watch.

That's not what many Louisville Catholics expected when Kurtz arrived in 2007 to take over the archdiocese, which was rocked by a major child sex abuse scandal a few years earlier.

Previous church leaders in Kentucky's largest Catholic community had allowed abusive priests to remain in ministry while silencing their victims, a practice laid bare when hundreds sued the church, winning a $25.7 million settlement in 2003.

Kurtz came in as a warm and inviting man with a remarkable ability to remember everyone's name. It was hoped he would help heal wounds in the archdiocese. Abuse survivor Cal Pfeiffer recalls thinking the new archbishop was either incredibly nice or just a great politician.

A decade later, some abuse survivors say they know which it is.

About the Courier Journal's report on Louisville Catholic abuse survivors

LOUISVILLE (KY)
Louisville Courier Journal

November 7, 2018

This report was prepared using legal depositions and other documents from multiple lawsuits, as well as criminal records and news archives. Reporter Caitlin McGlade also interviewed Catholic church leaders in Louisville and Owensboro, as well as abuse survivors, activists, attorneys and lifelong Catholics.

Caitlin McGlade is a member of the Courier Journal's investigative team. The Dayton, Ohio, native is a 2011 graduate of Ohio University.

Before joining the Courier Journal in 2017, McGlade covered one of the nation's largest school districts for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and investigated school bus safety, water quality problems and public health issues for the Arizona Republic. Her work has been recognized by the Arizona Press Club and the Ohio Society of Professional Journalists.

Her previous work in Louisville includes an in-depth investigation of danger related to 15-passenger vans commonly used by churches.

Former local priests named in new Catholic Church sexual abuse list

ATLANTA (GA)
Reporter Newspapers

November 7, 2018

By Evelyn Andrews

Four former priests who served at local churches in the 1960s through 1990s have been named in a document listing sexual abuse allegations that was released by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta Nov. 6. One of the priests has already been the subject of a lawsuit over abuse that allegedly took place in Stone Mountain.

Cases of child sexual abuse by Catholic priests and people in other church positions have been widespread across the globe and has led to many allegations. The new Atlanta list shows priests were “credibly” accused at many metro area churches, including Buckhead’s Cathedral of Christ the King, which is the archdiocese’s mother church, Brookhaven’s Our Lady of the Assumption and Dunwoody’s All Saints Catholic Church.

The list does not detail where the allegations occurred, but only shows the churches in which each priest served.

Jacob Bollmer, who served at Cathedral of Christ the King from 1968 to 1969, was accused and removed from ministry in 1987, according to the list.

Jorge Cristancho was laicized, or removed of his priesthood, after allegations in 2003. Cristancho served at Christ the King in from 1988 to 1992. He took a leave of absence from 1987 to 1988, the list said.

Former Temple Terrace priest accused of inappropriate contact with minor

TAMPA BAY (FL)
Tampa Bay Times

November 6, 2018

By Waveney Ann Moore

Just a few weeks ago, a man sued the Catholic Diocese of St. Petersburg alleging that he had been abused as a child by one of its priests.

This week the diocese is being forced to respond to another allegation of priest misconduct, this time by the Rev. Nicholas McLoughlin, who served locally between 1972 and 1982 and has had some trouble at the nearby Diocese of Venice.

According to the Diocese of St. Petersburg, McLoughlin, now 76, is accused of "inappropriate physical contact with a minor" during the 1970s. The incident is alleged to have taken place while the priest was assigned to Corpus Christi Catholic Church in Temple Terrace.

McLoughlin served as pastor of Corpus Christi from 1973 to 1982 and as an associate pastor of St. John Vianney at St. Pete Beach and pastor of the now closed Bishop Barry High School and Notre Dame Academy in St. Petersburg from June 1972 to August 1973. The two schools merged to become St. Petersburg Catholic High School in the 1973-74 school year.

Who Represents the Laity?

NEW YORK (NY)
Commonweal

November 7, 2018

By Massimo Faggioli

One of the most important moments in the pontificate of Francis could be the publication, probably sometime in the next few months, of the apostolic constitution Praedicate evangelium, about the reform of the Roman Curia. It will be interesting to see what Francis’s reform will keep of the old Roman Curia created by Pope Sixtus V in 1588, which is still very similar to the one we have today. It will also be very interesting to see what place is accorded to new institutions, especially the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors, established by Francis in March 2014. The relationship of that commission to the other congregations and dicasteries of the Vatican has, until now, been unclear and precarious.

Francis’s use of the Roman Curia—and his way of governing the church mostly without it—says a lot about his vision for the future of Catholicism. What is most remarkable is that this pontificate has caused so much opposition even though there has been so little institutional change in the five-and-a-half years since Francis became pope. The Bishops’ Synod is an exception. Otherwise, Francis has been remarkably reluctant to make changes in the curial status quo. We can see this from the kind of lay people he has appointed in the curia. On October 6 the Vatican announced new appointments to the Dicastery for Laity, Family, and Life. These included bishops and clergy, but also new lay members. Many of the new members come from the so-called new ecclesial movements: International Ecclesial Team of “Worldwide Marriage Encounter,” Schoenstatt, Communion and Liberation, the Catholic community Shalom (Brazil), Community of Sant’Egidio, and the Focolare movement.

These appointments raise an important question about the kind of laity that is represented in the Dicastery for Laity, Family, and Life. The problem is not that these new lay members are particularly liberal or conservative; the problem is that the ecclesial movements they represent are hardly representative of the Catholic laity overall. These movements are very good at promoting themselves—witness their success in securing recognition from church authorities. But the vast majority of the Catholic laity are not affiliated with any of these movements and are represented by no one in the Vatican, unless we count the nonordained members of this dicastery who were appointed for their professional expertise.

'They don't care about me': Catholic abuse survivors don't trust Louisville's archbishop

LOUISVILLE KY
The Courier Journal

November 7, 2018

By Caitlin McGlade

Two senior Catholic officials who remained silent decades ago when priests were accused of sexually abusing Louisville children have been kept in power — and even promoted — on Archbishop Joseph Kurtz's watch.

That's not what many Louisville Catholics expected when Kurtz arrived in 2007 to take over the archdiocese, which was rocked by a major child sex abuse scandal a few years earlier.

Previous church leaders in Kentucky's largest Catholic community had allowed abusive priests to remain in ministry while silencing their victims, a practice laid bare when hundreds sued the church, winning a $25.7 million settlement in 2003.

Kurtz came in as a warm and inviting man with a remarkable ability to remember everyone's name. It was hoped he would help heal wounds in the archdiocese. Abuse survivor Cal Pfeiffer recalls thinking the new archbishop was either incredibly nice or just a great politician

Resurgence Of Cleric Scandal Invigorates U.S. Critics Of Pope Francis

ROME (ITALY)
National Public Radio

November 7, 2018

By Sylvia Poggioli

Every Sunday at noon, Pope Francis concludes his greeting to the crowd in St. Peter's Square by wishing them a good Sunday meal.

But the warm cheers for the pope from the crowd in the square contrast with strident commentary that can be heard outside Vatican walls.

In America, some politically conservative Catholics have long criticized Pope Francis for being pro-migrants, anti-capitalist and less rigid on doctrine than his two predecessors.

More recently, the resurgence of clerical sex abuse scandals has further emboldened these critics of the pope who oppose his big-tent vision of the Catholic Church.

That sentiment can be heard in a video clip from Church Militant, an American website. The video was shot behind St Peter's Square during the recent synod, a month-long bishops meeting that focused on youth.

Fiscalía entrega nuevas cifras por investigaciones de abusos en la Iglesia: 124 causas vigentes y 8 obispos indagados

[Prosecutor delivers new figures for Church abuse investigations: 124 cases and 8 bishops investigated]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 7, 2018

By C. Reyes and L. Zapata

Los datos entregados son hasta el 24 de octubre del presente año. Además, se detalló que hay 222 víctimas.

Una nueva actualización de los casos vigentes relativos a presuntos delitos sexuales cometidos por miembros de la Iglesia Católica entregó la Fiscalía Nacional.

Roots of Catholic anger

DENVER (CO)
Denver Catholic

November 7, 2018

By George Weigel

After a month out of the country, working in Rome at Synod-2018 and helping mark the 40th anniversary of John Paul II’s election at events in Brussels and Warsaw, I came home to find Catholic anger over the latest phase of the abuse crisis unabated and intensified in some quarters. That this crisis is not acknowledged for what it is by the highest authorities in Rome is a subject for another reflection at another time. The question today is: What are the roots of today’s Catholic anger and disgust?

Part of the answer to that, surely, is exhaustion. Why must we go through this again? Wasn’t the Long Lent of 2002 enough? Weren’t things fixed then?

Those whose anger is stoked by these understandable questions might have a look at a recent and thoughtful article by Kenneth Woodward in Commonweal. Woodward understands that ripping the cover off the serial sexual predations of the former archbishop of Washington, Theodore McCarrick, triggered a gag-reflex among the Catholic laity that seems to have been bred out of at least some Catholic clergy, both here in the United States and in Rome. But the longtime religion editor of Newsweek also identifies another factor in today’s Catholic rage that ought to cause all of us to pause and think for a moment. Writing about the Pennsylvania grand jury report that sent Catholic anger through the roof this summer, my friend Woodward made a crucial point:

Statement from the Diocese of Sioux City

SIOUX CITY (IA)
Diocese of Sioux City

November 7, 2018

We are well aware of and understand the public, our parishioners’ and victims’ dismay at the information released in the Associated Press (AP) article dated October 31, 2018 regarding Jerry Coyle. We know that the AP reporter is now investigating all of our past and present actions at the Diocese of Sioux City, in order to create his next story. We are researching old records with the Review Board, an advisory board made up of lay people in the Diocese, including licensed therapists, a judge, nurses, police officers, and a psychiatrist, who advise the Bishop in his assessment of allegations of sexual abuse of minors and in his determination of suitability for ministry; offer advice on all aspects of these cases; and make recommendations they deem appropriate to reduce the risk to children. The issue that is most important for the public to understand is that many of the allegations made in the past, prior to the 2002 “Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People” were not followed up with an investigation by civil authorities. The Church often sent priests to treatment, in hopes that any actions of misconduct could be cured. We know now that is not the way to handle any allegation of sexual misconduct, and with the 2002 Charter to guide us, we have protocols in place to follow, which we do. When victims report as adults, the statute of limitations often has passed, meaning that the alleged abuser priest could not be prosecuted, even if the allegation from the past is deemed credible. This makes it very difficult to know what to do with priests that have allegations made against them, but no prosecution by civil authorities, and no incarceration for the alleged crime.

It should be noted that after the 2002 Charter we asked the Woodbury County Attorney and other county attorneys to come in and look through priest records. At that time, they declined for various reasons including: because the statute of limitations had passed, and many of the priests accused were dead.

With the Catholic Bishops, It's Always Someone Else's Sin That's Responsible for the Abuse Crisis

ARKANSAS
Bilgrimmage

November 6, 2018

By William Lindsey

US Catholic Bishops
@USCCB
During the next seven days, bishops across the U.S. will dedicate themselves to intensified prayer and fasting. We pray for victims of clergy sexual abuse, the conversion and just punishment of perpetrators and concealers of sexual abuse, and the strength to be holy shepherds.

The preceding announcement is a prelude to the gathering of the U.S. Catholic bishops that will occur next week in Baltimore. Catholic News Service editor Julie Asher tweeted the following yesterday on behalf of the bishops:

Julie Asher
@jlasher
Today is first of 7 days of "intensified" prayer, fasting, reparation all U.S. bishops called to by @USCCB president ahead of fall meeting in Baltimore where addressing abuse crisis to top agenda.

In my view, this showy announcement about prayer, fasting, reptentance, and conversion is diversionary. As I said recently, when it comes to the abuse horror show, it's always someone else's sin — never the sin of the bishops. It's always someone else's sin, when the leaders of the Catholic church address that horror show.

The statement that "we pray for … the conversion and just punishment of perpetrators and concealers of sexual abuse” does not own their responsibility for protecting and concealing sexual abuse of minors and vulnerable people by Catholic clergy. It rhetorically disguises the bishops' responsibility.

"We pray for their conversion" is a different statement from, "We pray for our conversion."

Attorney for accused priest claims OKC archbishop omitting facts

ENID (OK)
Enid News & Eagle

November 7, 2018

By Mitchell Willetts

The attorney representing the Rev. James Mickus, a Catholic priest with Enid ties facing allegations of sexual abuse, said he might soon file a defamation lawsuit against the archbishop of the Oklahoma City Archdiocese.

In a letter to Archbishop Rev. Paul Coakley, Enid-based attorney Stephen Jones wrote he is investigating whether Coakley has defamed Mickus by omitting critical facts about the allegations made against his client.

Allegations of abuse first surfaced against Mickus in 2002, while he was a pastor at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church in Enid. The accuser said Mickus had sexually abused him nearly 20 years earlier in a former parish. Mickus subsequently was removed from ministry while an archdiocese review board investigated the claims.

Mickus was reinstated in 2003 after the review board found insufficient evidence to support the claims made against him.

In a statement released Sunday, Coakley announced allegations of sexual abuse of a minor are under review and that Mickus would be removed from ministry pending investigation.

Foundation behind MormonLeaks urges Utah lawmakers to remove ‘clergy exemption’ from child abuse reporting laws

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE
The Salt Lake Tribune

November 7, 2018

By Peggy Fletcher Stack
·
The Truth and Transparency Foundation — the nonprofit group behind the controversial MormonLeaks website — is launching a petition drive calling on Utah legislators to drop the “clergy exemption” from laws about mandatory reporting of child abuse.

This exemption frees religious leaders from reporting abuse if they learn about it from perpetrators. It is based on a belief in the sanctity of the communication between penitent believers who confess to their spiritual leaders.

Such an exemption, though, is “an affront to the safety and well-being of abuse survivors,” the group writes in an email that went out Wednesday to all Utah legislators, “and provides an environment where predators are enabled.”

Priests, deacons, seminarians and religious with credible allegations of sexual abuse of minors

ATLANTA (GA)
Georgia Catholic Bulletin

November 6, 2018

The Archdiocese of Atlanta is committed to the protection of minors, as well as to compliance with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People. In a spirit of transparency and the hope of continued healing for the survivors of abuse, I have decided to release the list of the priests, deacons, seminarians and religious credibly accused of sexual abuse of a minor. The list below was compiled from the best information available to us at this time, and covers the period from the establishment of the Diocese of Atlanta in 1956 (we became an archdiocese in 1962) until now.

The list is divided into three parts:

Guam's Catholic church to file for bankruptcy amid $115M in lawsuits

NEW YORK (NY)
NBC News

November 7, 2018

Guam's Catholic church will file for bankruptcy — a move that will allow the archdiocese to avoid trial in dozens of lawsuits alleging child sexual abuse by priests and move toward settlements.

Archbishop Michael Byrnes announced Wednesday that mediation efforts that began in September led the church to bankruptcy.

"This path will bring the greatest measure of justice to the greatest number of victims," Byrnes said. "That's the heart of what we're doing."

Byrnes said the bankruptcy will provide "finality for victim survivors that they've been heard and understood."

Neronha is Rhode Island’s New Attorney General

PROVIDENCE (RI)
GoLocalProv

November 6, 2018

Democratic candidate for attorney general Peter Neronha, claimed victory tonight and replaces Peter F. Kilmartin who has been in office since 2011.

The former U.S. attorney general ran against Alan Gordon, the Compassion Party candidate, for the position and was a largely controversial figure in the race. The Rhode Island Republican party failed to run a candidate.

Last month, during a debate with Neronha at a North Kingstown high school, Gordon spelled out the n-word and he previously had also arrested with his partner Anne Armstrong for holding 48 pounds of marijuana. In September, Neronha said on GoLocal LIVE, "As a general matter, I fully support government transparency and, if elected, would ensure that the Office of Attorney General, as well as all other state government agencies, comply with the requirements of the Access to Public Records Act. Further, access to public records should not be cost prohibitive. Perhaps we should consider legislative changes to minimize the financial barriers while still providing adequate resources to public agencies responsible for responding to these records requests."

On Neronha’s campaign website, he touts his successes in taking on the opioid crisis, bringing major cases against cartel-linked drug trafficking organizations as well as fighting for stricter gun laws. Neronha also claims that he is committed to prioritizing environmental protection, both nationally and locally.

As GoLocal reported last month, the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests (SNAP) called upon Neronha to commit to investigating the Diocese of Providence after the U.S. Justice Department launched an investigation into alleged sexual abuse by clergy in Pennsylvania’s Roman Catholic Church.

As Church plays down ties with troubled group, records show close bond

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

November 7, 2018

By Claire Giangravè

As its lay leader stands accused of sexually abusing ten women, including several who were minors, a powerful lay organization in southern Italy is revealed by records from four separate court proceedings, obtained by Crux, to have had a close but complicated relationship with Church authorities.

All the witnesses brought before the court between November 2017 and June 2018 confirmed that the lay Catholic Culture and Environment Association, or “ACCA”, based in the town of Aci Bonaccorsi, Sicily, met every Sunday for Mass at a local parish, followed by a meeting at the nearby headquarters, known as the “Cenacle”, where priests would also attend.

Following accusations in August 2016 against the lay leader of ACCA, Piero Alfio Capuana, who was called the “Archangel” by his followers, the local diocese of Acireale released a statement saying that there were no ties between the lay organization and ecclesial authorities.

Pope sends message to French Bishops attending plenary assembly

ROME (ITALY)
Vatican News

November 7, 2018

In the message signed by the Cardinal Secretary of State, Pietro Parolin, the Pope encourages the Bishops to persevere in the fight against pedophilia, urging them to continue in their implementation of a “zero tolerance” stance against sexual abuse committed by certain members of the Church, without ever forgetting, he says, “to recognize and support the humble fidelity lived in daily life, with the grace of God, by so many priests, men and women religious, consecrated and lay faithful.” He also stresses the importance of listening to the victims whose wounds, he adds, will never be healed by a prescription.

Turning his attention to the youth of the country, the Pope in the message offers his thanks for all that the Church in France “has already accomplished in the service of accompanying and evangelizing young people, especially within Catholic education.”

In this spirit, Pope Francis invites the Bishops to invoke the Holy Spirit strongly so that the work of the recent Synod may contribute, in France and in the world, to opening "new paths of harmony with the expectations of young people and with the search for a deep spirituality and a more concrete sense of belonging."

Why each of us should demand the church expose and remove sexual predators

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Advocate

November 6, 2018

By Dan Fagan

My paternal grandmother was born in 1903 in Swinford, Ireland, into a family of 11. At 16, her parents, because of poverty, put her on a ship to America to live with her older sister, knowing they'd probably never see her again.

My grandmother's impoverished beginnings and living through the Great Depression caused her to be singularly frugal. I'm convinced she had the same ketchup bottle for years. Each time she'd add just a little more water to it. While frugal with material things, she was richly generous with her love.

My grandmother spent her final years living in the Wynhoven Apartments, a retirement high-rise run by the Catholic Church in Marrero. As a kid I loved spending the night with Grandma because she adored me. She made me feel loved, peaceful and safe.

Her apartment was at the end of the hall on the eighth floor. To her immediate right was a door leading to a balcony overlooking the Hope Haven-Madonna Manor orphanage. The view was spectacular with the Spanish-colonial architecture. It was like going back in time. We would often watch kids play at sunset from that balcony. I also remember thinking how sad it was the kids didn't have parents or someone like my grandmother to make them feel wanted and loved.

Deceased St. Bonaventure University friar among newly identified accused priests

ST. BONAVENTURE (NY)
Olean Times Herald

November 7, 2018

By Tom Dinki

A longtime and now-deceased St. Bonaventure University friar was credibly accused of sexually abusing a minor.

The Rev. Maurice Scheier was among the additional 36 priests identified by Buffalo Bishop Richard Malone on Monday as having had substantiated claims of abuse against them. Scheier worked at St. Bonaventure from 1928 to 1986, leading the university’s math department and serving as dean of science, before his death in 1991.

SBU-TV, St. Bonaventure’s student-run news station, first reported Scheier’s connection to the university.

In a statement Tuesday, St. Bonaventure President Dr. Dennis DePerro said Monday’s announcement was the first time university officials learned of accusations against Scheier, adding their records do not indicate Scheier was ever accused of abuse while employed at St. Bonaventure.

DePerro said clergy abuse claims are investigated and adjudicated by either the bishop or the friar’s sponsoring province, which in Scheier’s case was Holy Name Province of the Franciscan Friars. DePerro said any inquiries should be directed to the provincial minister of Holy Name Province, who could not immediately be reached Tuesday.

One in three living bishops accused of failure to respond to sexual misconduct

NEW YORK (NY)
Irish Central

November 7, 2018

A Boston Globe and Philadelphia Inquirer investigation finds that while US bishops promised reform, they not only failed to adequately respond to sexual misconduct but failed to oust other bishops guilty of abuse.

When US bishops gathered in Dallas in 2002, they promised major reform, after the clergy sex abuse scandal exploded in Boston and the Catholic Church in the United States found itself drowning in scandal.

While this historic meeting of bishops promised an end to the covering up and mishandling of allegations of clerical sex abuse, what they delivered was yet another decade and a half of misleading US Catholics and failing to adequately respond to accusations against both priests and themselves.

According to an investigation carried out by the Boston Globe and Philadelphia Inquirer, which delved into the court records, media reports, and interviews with church officials, victims, and attorneys, these bishops both enabled sexual misconduct of priests and were guilty of it themselves, even in the years following their public declaration of an end to concealment and cover-ups.

The investigation found that more than 130 US bishops - almost a third of those still alive - had been accused of failing to adequately deal with allegations of misconduct, with 50 of these allegations being made regarding incidents that occurred after the bishops' 2002 gathering.

Sioux City Diocese says it erred and will identify accused priests

SIOUX CITY (IA)
Associated Press

November 6, 2018

By Ryan J. Foley

An Iowa Roman Catholic diocese released a lengthy statement Tuesday about the revelation that it had covered up a priest's sexual abuse of boys for decades and promised to identify all priests who have faced credible allegations.

The Diocese of Sioux City urged anyone who has ever been abused by one of its priests to report the misconduct. The diocese said it will use all information in its possession to create and publish a list of credibly accused priests, a step it had long resisted.

The diocese's actions come in response to an investigation by the Associated Press, which last week broke the church's 32-year silence on serial abuse by the Rev. Jerome Coyle.

The diocese said more disclosures of misconduct may be forthcoming.

Coyle admitted to then-Bishop Lawrence Soens in 1986 to having sexually abused 50 boys over a 20-year period. The diocese said that it should have notified parishes and asked victims to come forward back then, and apologized that its former leaders failed to do so. Instead, the diocese sent Coyle to a treatment center for accused priests in New Mexico, where he lived and worked as a civilian for decades.

The diocese said that its current leadership should have notified the public this summer when Coyle was placed at a retirement home near a Catholic school, which he moved out of last week following AP's disclosure of his history. But the statement said that its bishop, R. Walker Nickless, "inherited many issues from the past," including the challenge of finding housing for accused priests who were never charged and aren't listed as sex offenders.

Archdiocese to file for bankruptcy in light of clergy sex abuse lawsuit

GUAM
KUAM TV

November 7, 2018

By Krystal Paco

Bankruptcy -- it only makes sense. The Archdiocese of Agana announcing on Wednesday plans to file a Chapter 11 reorganization proceeding in the U.S. District Court of Guam sometime between mid-December and mid-January.

Bankruptcy counsel Ford Elsaesser announced, "For many dioceses, this is the only fair way to deal with the claims of the abuse survivors and at the same time provide for the continued operation of the mission of the church, including of course the parishes and the schools."

Archdiocese lead counsel Keith Talbot echoing those sentiments, saying, "Bankruptcy does two really good things for us: one is its finality. And finality is for the archdiocese going forward. Finality is also an option, it's an aspect of bankruptcy that's very helpful with insurance carriers. The other part is bankruptcy is the method to deliver the greatest measure of justice to the greatest number of victims. And it's obviously not only an objective for the archdiocese but the other co-defendants, but certainly the plaintiffs' counsel, as well."

November 6, 2018

National Review Board chairman seeks fix to address charter ‘loophole’

WASHINGTON (DC)
Catholic News Service

November 7, 2018

By Dennis Sadowski

The National Review Board chairman called for changes to the “Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People” to “make it a less ambiguous document” because despite nearly every diocese meeting its standards in third-party audits, some bishops are facing scrutiny about their handling of reports of wayward priests.

Francesco Cesareo, the board’s chairman since 2013, told Catholic News Service Nov. 5 that board members have raised concerns for “a long time … that the audit instrument may not be getting at information that we need to get.”

He also expressed “frustration” that new questions have surfaced about how some bishops responded to clergy sex abuse, especially after pledging openness and transparency after the 2002 crisis exploded.

“This is much more of a crisis of a failure of leadership,” he said.

“It is frustrating because on the one hand, you know that the church has put in place all of these policies and procedures, which have definitely made a difference. All of these allegations are historic. (There are) very few new ones,” he said.

DiNardo, USCCB head, was bishop during years diocese hid priest's abuse

FORT DODGE (IA)
National Catholic Reporter

November 6, 2018

By Peter Feuerherd

The Diocese of Sioux City admitted Oct. 31 that it had concealed for decades the identity of a priest who had abused dozens of Iowa boys, as reported by the Associated Press. One of the bishops during that period was Daniel DiNardo, now cardinal archbishop of Galveston-Houston and president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

The Associated Press obtained a Feb. 12 letter written by the diocese vicar general. According to the letter, AP reports that "in 1986, Coyle reported his 'history of sexual attraction to and contact with boys' to Sioux City's bishop, revealing that he had victimized approximately 50 youths over a 20-year period while serving in several Iowa parishes."

Bishop R. Walker Nickless of the Diocese of Sioux City, Iowa, acknowledged Oct. 31, in answer to an Associated Press inquiry, that "police were not contacted when Coyle self-admitted, but policies have changed since 1986."

The supervisors of Coyle, now 85 years old, included DiNardo, who served as bishop in Sioux City from 1998 to 2004. DiNardo, as president of the conference, has been a leading voice in the response to this year's sex abuse revelations, including a Pennsylvania grand jury report and charges of harassment and abuse of minors by former cardinal Theodore McCarrick of Washington.

The Sioux City case became public as the bishops prepared to gather for their annual meeting in Baltimore Nov. 12-14, during which a response to the sex abuse crisis will be on the agenda.

DiNardo became the archbishop of Galveston-Houston in 2006, after being named coadjutor there in 2004. He was named a cardinal in 2007. DiNardo has urged the church to come forward with full transparency about the crisis.

Sioux City Diocese calling on public to come forward with abuse claims

SIOUX CITY
Sioux City Journal

November 6, 2018

By Earl Horlyk

The Sioux City Catholic Diocese is asking members of the public to come forward if they or their child has been a victim of sexual abuse by any priest in the diocese, which encompasses more than 70 parishes in 24 northwest Iowa counties.

This is the result of parishioner and public dismay following news that the diocese concealed for decades a priest's admission that he had sexually abused approximately 50 boys over a 20-year period.

Now 85 years old, The Rev. Jerome Coyle, was stripped of his parish assignments in the 1980s. Coyle, who started as a faculty member at Bishop Heelan High School in 1959, an assistant pastor at Cathedral of the Epiphany and Immaculate Conception in the early-to-mid-1960s and pastor at St. Cecilia Parish, in Sanborn, Iowa, from 1978 to 1986, was never defrocked despite being publicly identified by the church as an admitted pedophile.

Through an Oct. 31 investigative report by the Associated Press (AP), it was discovered that the diocese helped Coyle move into a retirement home in Fort Dodge, Iowa, without informing administrators of a Catholic school located across the street.

"We know that the AP reporter is now investigating all of our past and present actions at the Diocese of Sioux City, in order to create his next story," the diocese said in a news release on Tuesday. "We are researching old records with the Review Board (an advisory board made such lay people as licensed therapists, nurses, police officers, a judge and a psychiatrist)."

New Hampshire priest defrocked

MANCHESTER (NH)
New Hampshire Union Leader

November 6, 2018

By Mark Hayward

A New Hampshire priest officially has been defrocked, 32 years after Catholic church officials suspended him over allegations of sexual abuse and sexual misconduct, the Diocese of Manchester announced on Tuesday.

Philip A. Petit, who was ordained in April 1980, worked at parishes in Manchester, Dover, Berlin, Merrimack, Nashua and Plaistow, as well as at Portsmouth Regional Hospital. He was removed from the ministry in 1986 and had no permission to function as a priest since then, the diocese said.

In the early 2000s, the diocese suspended the faculties of numerous priests as a priest-sexual abuse scandal exploded in Boston and New Hampshire.

But officials stressed that the suspended priests were still technically priests and could only be defrocked by the Vatican.

Venice Catholic priest under investigation, bishop says

VENICE (FL)
The Ledger

November 5, 2018

By Carlos R. Munoz

The Rev. Nick McLoughlin of the Diocese of Venice has been placed on administrative leave while the Diocese of St. Petersburg reviews a complaint of “inappropriate physical contact with a minor” lodged against him.

The Diocese of Venice declined to state the nature McLoughlin’s exact duties before he was suspended.

Bishop Frank Dewane told his parishioners in a letter last weekend that the allegation has “a semblance of truth.” He said the Diocese of Venice was notified by the Diocese of St. Petersburg of the allegation, which was made by a person who would have been a minor at the time McLoughlin served as pastor of Corpus Christi Parish in Temple Terrace from 1973 to 1982.

The Diocese of St. Petersburg opened an investigation to determine the facts, Dewane said.

“Because Fr. McLoughlin is now a priest of the Diocese of Venice, this Diocese was also notified and asked to take appropriate action,” Dewane stated. “In accord with the policies of the Diocese of Venice and to allow for an objective review in the Diocese of St. Petersburg, Fr. McLoughlin has been placed on administrative leave. When the Diocese of St. Petersburg has concluded its investigation, the findings will be presented to the Diocese of Venice.”

In a statement sent to the Herald-Tribune, a spokeswoman for the Diocese of St. Petersburg said that “An allegation of inappropriate physical contact with a minor has been made against Rev. Nicholas McLoughlin, a priest of the Diocese of Venice, who served as pastor of Corpus Christi Parish, Temple Terrace from 1973 to 1982. He previously served as associate pastor of St. John Vianney, St. Pete Beach and pastor of Bishop Barry and Notre Dame High Schools in St. Petersburg from June 1972 to August 1973.

More names on Buffalo diocese misconduct list

BUFFALO (NY)
Times Union/The Associated Press

November 5, 2018

The Diocese of Buffalo has added 36 names to its public list of priests with substantiated claims of sexual abuse of a child, bringing the number to 78.

Officials say they will not name an additional 66 dead priests who were the subject of a single abuse complaint.

Bishop Richard Malone released the revised list Monday and again fended off calls from some community members and other priests to resign over his handling of clergy abuse.

Attorney of removed priest: ‘Nothing new has happened other than more unfavorable publicity’

OKLAHOMA CITY (OK)
KFOR

November 5, 2018

By Lili Zheng

The attorney of a Catholic priest facing an allegation of child sex abuse is sharing his side of the story.

On Sunday, the Archdiocese of Oklahoma announced Father James Mickus had been removed from ministry pending an investigation of alleged child sex abuse. Mickus, a pastor for two Catholic churches in Chandler and Stroud, has served at more than a dozen churches in Oklahoma.

We're told the allegation does not involve Mickus' current parishes.

His attorney, Stephen Jones, told News 4 he is confident the allegation stems from 2002, when Mickus was first accused and later exonerated. Mickus was informed of his removal by Archbishop Paul Coakley on Friday.

Catholic diocese adds another former priest to those credibly accused of abuse of minors

SOUTH BEND (IN)
South Bend Tribune

November 6, 2018

Another former priest has been added to the Catholic Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend’s list of clerics credibly accused of abuse of a minor, the diocese announced Tuesday.

Gerald Funcheon was a member of the Crosier Congregation, but assigned at times within the diocese.

He was included on a list published by the Crosier Fathers of those credibly accused of abuse of a minor. He has been added to the diocese list because of a credible accusation of abuse that took place while assigned in in the diocese, according to the diocese.

Funcheon was ordained in 1965 and was removed from ministry on April 1, 1993, according to the diocese.

LARRY ANTONSEN: HEALING, HELPING AND SPEAKING OUT

CHICAGO (IL)
Medill Reports

November 6, 2018

By Karyn Simpson

Larry Antonsen wants to do everything he can to ensure no child is ever abused by a priest again. That’s why he works with the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP) and attends events like All Survivor’s Day at Holy Name Cathedral Parish. The day is dedicated to drawing attention to sexual abuse by clergy members and demanding justice for the survivors. As a survivor of sexual abuse by a priest and a still-practicing member of the Catholic faith, Antonsen knows how hard it can be to heal from this kind of trauma. He wants to share his story in hopes it can give someone else the courage to come forward and get help.

Magdalene women excluded from redress scheme to be paid

DUBLIN (IRELAND)
Irish Times

November 6, 2018

By Patsy McGarry

The situation of about 200 women who had been in Magdalene laundries but have to date been excluded from a State redress scheme is expected to be resolved this week, the Department of Justice has said.

The matter is to be addressed at the Cabinet meeting and a spokesman for the department said on Monday night that it expected “to be in a position later this week to write to the women concerned and to start processing awards”.

A Magdalene redress scheme has already paid compensation to 700 women, but awards have been withheld from those who did not live in the institutions. Though they worked in the laundries, they were accommodated elsewhere, usually in adjoining premises.

Ombudsman Peter Tyndall had warned the department that it needed to move speedily to deal with compensation for these women.

Oklahoma priest removed from ministry amid investigation into sexual abuse of minor claim

OKLAHOMA CITY (OK)
KOCO News

November 5, 2018

An Oklahoma priest has been removed from ministry pending an investigation into an allegation of sexual abuse against a minor, according to officials with the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City.

The archdiocese's review board is looking into an allegation made against Father James Mickus, who currently serves as the pastor of Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church in Chandler and Saint Louis Catholic Church in Stroud. The allegation does not include Mickus' current parishes, officials said.

U.S. Olympic Committee takes step to dismantle USA Gymnastics

UNITED STATES
Yahoo Sports

November 5, 2018

By Jack Baer

Two years after the details of Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse started to come out, it looks like Team USA has decided it wants to tear down the entire framework of its gymnastics team.

The United States Olympic Committee released a statement from CEO Sarah Hirshland on Monday announcing that it is has filed a complaint seeking to revoke the recognition of USA Gymnastics as the national governing body for the sport.

Senior Jehovah's Witness 'sexually abused young girl'

WALES
Wales On Line

November 5, 2018

By Marcus Hughes

An elder member of a Jehovah’s Witness congregation subjected a girl to years of sexual abuse, a court has heard.

Thomas Brian Jenkins, 74, appeared at Merthyr Crown Court on Monday charged with 20 counts of indecent assault against a girl in the 1970s.

The alleged abuse began when the girl was 12 years old and continued until she was 14.

Jenkins, of Landor Road, Redditch, Worcestershire, denies indecently assaulting the girl by touching her genitals on “dozens of occasions".

Opening the case for the prosecution, Timothy Evans said the abuse began shortly after the girl moved to a village in Powys with her family, who were Jehovah’s Witnesses, and became involved with the local congregation.

Bishop O’Malley is “Shocked” by the Globe / Inquirer Report, SNAP Responds

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

November 6, 2018

Pope Francis' US point person on abuse told the The Inquirer that he was "shocked" to learn that so many of his colleagues were hiding abuse and abusers. Frankly, we do not understand his reaction at all.

Boston’s Cardinal Sean O’Malley is the "top dog" when it comes to clergy sex crimes and cover ups in the US. Yet he appeared surprised at the findings by the Globe/Inquirer that "130 bishops – almost one-third of all those living – have been accused during their career of failing to adequately respond to sexual misconduct in their dioceses."

Nearly every situation and bishop mentioned in the outstanding Globe/Inquirer investigation has been reported, sometimes years ago, in other reputable news outlets. So little if any of this should have "shocked" the Cardinal. Rather, we would have assumed that he was keeping track of this information and transmitting it to the Vatican.

"A Broad, Deep, Clerical Conspiracy" and "Bishop Accountability Has Proved a Contradiction in Terms"

ARKANSAS
Bilgrimmage

November 5, 2018

By William Lindsey

And there's more: here's another diptych from recent commentary that I want to offer for your consideration — about a totally different topic than the one discussed in the diptych I just provided in my previous posting:

James J. Heaney, "Our Myth, Their Lie":

The structure [i.e., Roman Catholic clericalism] I have just described could hardly be better at catalyzing abuse. Look at Cardinals Egan and McCarrick. One was considered conservative, the other liberal, but both were notorious on abuse—and St. John Paul gave both the red hat. How about Cardinal Mahony and Cardinal Pell? Archbishops Finn, Wilson, and Bruskewitz? Or Cardinal Law, the great conservative prelate whose punishment was promotion? The same story unfolds today in Honduras, Chile, and Australia.

Paglia says beyond apologies for past, Church must build new future

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

November 6, 2018

By Elise Harris

In the wake of revelations surrounding scandals involving ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick and accusations by a former Vatican ambassador that Pope Francis and other curial officials knew and said nothing, a leading Italian prelate has said it’s important to build a new future rather than getting stuck in the past.

“Certainly it’s a difficult moment, we must look forward, not behind,” Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, chancellor of the Pontifical Academy for Life and for the John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family Sciences, said in a brief interview with Crux.

Paglia, who spoke at the Nov. 5 inauguration of the new academic year for the institute, was one of several Vatican officials named in an Aug. 25 letter published by former Vatican ambassador to the United States, Italian Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, who accused Paglia and others of belonging to a “homosexual current in favor of subverting Catholic doctrine on homosexuality” inside the Roman Curia.

Viganò also charged that several fellow prelates in the Vatican knew about allegations of misconduct against McCarrick, who has been faulted for sexual misconduct with seminarians and who was credibly accused of abusing a minor over the summer, yet McCarrick’s career advanced regardless.

Parishioners express support for priest who resigned from West Point church

OMAHA (NB)
World-Herald

November 5, 2018

By Alia Conley

Dozens of parishioners of a church in West Point, Nebraska, are voicing their support for a Catholic priest who resigned last week after the Omaha Archdiocese reviewed clergy assignments.

The Rev. Andy Syring, 41, left St. Mary’s Catholic Church after Archbishop George Lucas’ recent promise to “hold clergy to a higher standard of ministerial conduct.”

But more than 100 people have expressed support for Syring online, some sending prayers and others asking how they can fight the “injustice.”

Charissa J. Steffensmeier wrote that the West Point community is dealing with “outrage, confusion and dismay about that decision.” In a letter to Lucas, Steffensmeier asks him to reconsider accepting the resignation and praised Syring’s compassion, empathy, love for the church and ability to connect with parishioners of all backgrounds.

In 2014, Syring was accused of “significant boundary violations with young adults and minors” when he was associate pastor of Divine Mercy parish in Schuyler.

Mineola priest accused of sexual misconduct, steps aside

MINEOLA (NY)
News 12 Long Island

November 5, 2018

A Mineola priest is reportedly stepping aside amid allegations of sexual misconduct with children.

According to Newsday, Rev. Richard Kammerer had been serving as the associate pastor at the Corpus Christi Roman Catholic Church.

The paper says the Nassau district attorney is investigating the allegations.

Buffalo diocese expands list of credibly accused clerics

BUFFALO (NY)
Catholic News Agency

November 5, 2018

By Jonah McKeown

The Diocese of Buffalo is adding to their public list of clergy with credible allegations of sexual abuse against a minor.

Diocesan officials, including Bishop Richard Malone, held a press conference Nov. 5 during which they fielded questions from reporters about the investigation process for allegations of sexual abuse. Malone held a meeting with priests from across western New York earlier that day to discuss the current situation.

The new list contains an additional 20 names of clergy with “substantiated claims of sexual abuse of a minor,” as well as 16 names of clergy who were or are members of religious orders and had served in Buffalo.

Wellington priest who removed sexual abuse protest ribbons has change of heart

WELLINGTON (NEW ZEALAND)
Stuff NZ

November 6, 2018

By Damian George

A Wellington priest who took down ribbons tied to the gates of his church by child sexual abuse survivors has had a change of heart.

The ribbons were tied to the gates of the St Mary of the Angels Catholic church in Boulcott St on Thursday to acknowledge historic sexual abuse of children in the Wellington Diocese, particularly at St Patrick's College in Silverstream and Wellington City, and St Bernard's College in Lower Hutt.

But they were removed early on Friday by parish priest Kevin Conroy, who cited the church's policy that nothing could be placed on its grounds without permission.

'We're not going to hide:' Alaska archbishop fights clergy sex abuse

ANCHORAGE (AK)
KTVA TV

November 5, 2018

By Cassie Schirm

Anchorage's archbishop, who has emerged as one of the few heroes in a major newspaper story on bishops' lack of oversight regarding clergy sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, is continuing his inquiries in Alaska.

An independent commission is currently examining church personnel files for the past half-century in Anchorage, after Archbishop Paul Etienne asked it to do so a few weeks ago.

This isn't the first time Etienne has sought justice within the church.

Abuse survivor reacts to Bishop Malone's press conference

BUFFALO (NY)
WIVB TV

November 5, 2018

By Chris Horvatits

James Faluszczak referred to a press conference held by Diocese of Buffalo officials Monday as "information-overload".

Faluszczak, a survivor of clergy abuse, has been outspoken against Bishop Richard Malone and the diocese as the sexual abuse crisis has developed.

"What are they throwing at us?" Faluszczak asked. "What are the people in the pew going to get out of this? Is this an event for the press? Is this for the people in the pew? Because I honestly cannot tell what they're trying to accomplish."

Bishop conducts listening session about clergy sex abuse

COLUMBIA (MO)
Columbia Daily Tribune

November 5, 2018

By Roger McKinney

“God of justice and compassion, protect all children from abuse and deliver us from hate.”

That was part of the closing prayer delivered Monday by Shawn McKnight, bishop of the Jefferson City diocese, after a listening session at Our Lady of Lourdes Church about the Catholic sex abuse crisis.

There was raw emotion and thoughtful analysis among participants who spoke for more than an hour. McKnight will use the information he gathered Monday and at other listening sessions at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops next week.

“There are a lot of common themes,” McKnight said after the session. He said he thinks and feels the same as many of those who spoke.

“We’re all united in this one desire that this crisis would be solved as Christ would want us to,” McKnight said.

Steve Concannon, an attorney in Boonville, referred to a list of “reflection questions” in the program. One was: Do you think bishops should resign if it is found they are culpable in enabling sexual abuse?

“We talked about credibility earlier,” Concannon said. “Why is this even a question? It’s insulting that this is even a question.”

Former students at St. Charles Catholic School are coming forward with allegations of sexual abuse by Monsignor Thomas Bennett.

COLUMBUS (OH)
WSYX/WTTE TV

November 4, 2018

by Seema Iyer

St. Charles Catholic School in Columbus did more than prepare boys to become men, according to some former students, it may have also been an environment that fostered bullying, bigotry, and sex abuse.

In August a former student filed a lawsuit against St Charles, as well as the Columbus Diocese, claiming Monsignor Thomas Bennett, who died in 2008, had sexually abused him in the early 2000s. The former student, Kevin Heidtman, said it started when he had detentions with Bennett alone.

"That’s when things got more physical. Originally just over clothing but then eventually underneath," Heidtman said.

The lawsuit prompted others to come forward.

Join us in our Presence at the USCCB Fall General Assembly

MARYLAND
Maryland Catholics for Action

Join Maryland Catholics for Action outside the USCCB Fall General Assembly in Baltimore.

Catholics for Action will join our friends from the 5 Theses and the Survivors Network for those Abused by Priests (SNAP) at two events in Baltimore during the US Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) Retreat. Unlike the USCCB retreat, “all are welcome” to these two events.

An ally group invites all Catholic men and women to meet from 2-3 pm at St. Vincent de Paul Church and then do a rosary walk to the 4:30 Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine where they will tape a copy of their 5 Theses. More information as well as a copy of the 5 Theses can be found here.

ONE THIRD Of American Catholic Bishops 'Failed To Respond' To Sex Abuse Allegations — But That May Not Be The Worst Part Of The Story

The Daily Wire

November 5, 2018

By Emily Zanotti

A shocking new report compiled by a team of journalists from both the Boston Globe and the Philadelphia Inquirer alleges that at least one in three living, American Catholic bishops has been accused of failing to respond appropriately to claims of sexual abuse brought to their attention.

The report, over the weekend, offers a disturbing look into a Church hierarchy that was supposed to have been reformed in 2002, after the Boston Globe revealed that the Archdiocese of Boston had either covered up — or simply ignored — dozens of allegations of sexual misconduct against Boston priests.

Although much has been done to alleviate the possibility of sexual misconduct at the parish level, almost nothing has been done to root out misconduct among the Church's administration, and bishops have been allowed to escape both accountability and punishment.

Diocese right to speak out

MARIETTA (OH)
Marietta Times

November 6, 2018

The Diocese of Steubenville did the right thing last week when it released the names of priests who had been “credibly accused” of at least one act of sexual abuse of a minor. Some of the names were of men who are now deceased — that is important to those who have held their secrets for many years and may now quietly be receiving some small comfort from that validation.

Parishioners should be grateful to the diocese for its emphasis on the need to protect victims of abuse — and prevent future abuse — rather than to protect those who have used their positions of influence to inflict such damage.

In fact, according to Dino Orsatti, director of communications for the diocese, “we want to encourage anyone who has experienced abuse to come forward and to find healing and comfort,” even if the name of the accused is not on the current list.

November 5, 2018

Bishop Malone says Buffalo Diocese received 'tsunami' of abuse claims

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

November 5, 2018

By Jay Tokasz and Lou Michel

Buffalo Diocese officials, acknowledging a recent "tsunami" of new claims of child sex abuse, said Monday they added 36 priest's names to a list released in March that identified clergy who had been credibly accused of abuse.

The diocese's list of credibly accused priests now stands at 78 priests – and includes 16 priests who are members of religious orders, a category the diocese excluded in an original list of 42 priests.

Diocese officials said they counted a total of 176 diocesan and religious order priests against whom child sex abuse allegations were made, but they chose not to identify deceased priests who had a single allegation against them.

Catholic priests react to clergy sex abuse meeting with Bishop Malone

CHEEKTOWAGA (NY)
WKBW TV

November 5, 2018

By Josh Bazan

Bishop Richard Malone gathered all the priests in the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo for a meeting to discuss the clergy sex abuse scandal Monday afternoon. This, is the wake of explosive reporting by the 7 Eyewitness News I-Team in recent months that has shed light on the extent of Bishop Malone's involvement in the crisis.

“It’s going to be a long road," Father Jack Ledwon of St. Joseph University Parish in Buffalo said. "This is a marathon. This crisis developed over decades and it’s not going to be healed with a week or a new program or a new hire or something like that. It’s going to take a lot of effort on a lot of people’s parts and it’s going to be a long road back.”

Father Ledwon spoke to reporters after exiting the meeting with Bishop Malone at Infant of Prague Parish in Cheektowaga. Reverend Paul Seil of St. Bernadette's Church in Orchard Park also shared his thoughts on the meeting.

"I would call the mood somber," Reverend Seil said. "I would say that you could hear a pin drop for most of the parts. We got a lot of information. But, there were also some wonderful priests who spoke up about their own personal feelings about the crisis and how it's being handled."

According to priests in attendance, one member of the clergy called on Bishop Malone to resign and was met with applause from some fellow priests. However, the majority of priests still seem to support Bishop Malone, according to Reverend Seil.

NC5 Investigates: Critics Call for Independent Investigation of Sex Abuse by Priests

NASHVILLE (TN)
News Channel 5

November 5, 2018

By Ben Hall

Critics inside and outside the Catholic Church in Nashville are calling for an independent investigation of the Diocese.

It comes after the Diocese released the names of 13 former priests who were credibly accused of sexually abusing minors.

None of the priests listed by the Diocese are currently practicing.

As NewsChannel 5 Investigates reported Friday, nine are dead, two are in jail and the other two were dismissed from the priesthood years ago.

But Deacon Ron Deal of the Holy Family Catholic Church in Brentwood questioned if the list released the by the Diocese is complete.

Clergy Sex Abuse: The Hope Haven connection

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
WVUE TV

November 5, 2018

By Rob Masson

The Archdiocese of New Orleans list of clergy credibly accused of sexual abuse highlighted one particularly dark time at a Marrero orphanage.

One local attorney said more victims may come forward in the weeks and months ahead.

For 86 years, Hope Haven-Madonna Manor has served as a gateway to the west bank, but behind the orphanage’s ornate façade existed one of the Catholic church’s darkest secrets.

“Some of the abusers weren’t employed by the church. They were volunteers who were allowed to roam at will on the campus,” said attorney Roger Stetter, who sued the Archdiocese of New Orleans on behalf of sex abuse victims.

On the list of 57 abusive clergy members released by the archdiocese last week, eight - nearly one in seven - were credibly accused of abuse, and at one point spent time at Hope Haven.

“We’re telling the truth, and the truth will set you free,” Archbishop Gregory Aymond said Friday.

The list includes priests and clergy, many from the Salesian order, who served at Hope Haven, with one case dating back to the 1940s. The list includes Patrick Brady, Stanislaus Ceglar, Paul Csik, Anthony Esposito, Joseph Pankowski, Ernest Fagione and August Kita, who, the church said, were all credibly accused of abusing dozens of teens.

“In 2008 we filed a massive lawsuit with 59 named plaintiffs,” said Stetter.

Stetter would ultimately collect more than $5 million on behalf of those 59 plaintiffs, who began coming forward with their tales of abuse in 2005.

“Insurance companies picked up 50 percent of the tab to pay off these cases. ...None of them went to trial,” said Stett

Boston’s Cardinal O’Malley: Bishops need to hold themselves accountable

BOSTON (MA)
Boston Globe

November 5, 2018

By Thomas Farragher and Jenn Abelson

Pope Francis's chief adviser on sexual abuse believed the church had turned a critical corner. The year was 2002 and the future Cardinal Sean O'Malley was sitting in a ballroom where his fellow bishops had just pledged a new era of transparency and accountability in confronting the burgeoning clergy abuse crisis.

"I was very relieved,'' recalled O'Malley, who led the Fall River diocese at the time of the bishops' conference in Dallas 16 years ago. "I thought it was a path forward.''

American bishops face new judgment over sexual abuse after decades of failed reforms, cover-ups
But as the Philadelphia Inquirer and Boston Globe detailed Sunday in a special report, it wasn't.

More than 130 bishops – almost one-third of those still living – have been accused during their career of failing to adequately respond to sexual misconduct in their dioceses, according to an examination of thousands of court records, media reports, and interviews with church officials, victims, and attorneys.

Memphis Catholic activist questions name release of accused priests

MEMPHIS (TN)
Commercial Appeal

November 5, 2018

By Ron Maxey

The director of a Memphis-based Catholic organization has sent an open letter to Bishop J. Mark Spalding of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Nashville questioning last week's name release of 13 former priests accused of sexually abusing minors.

Patrick Benedict, a layperson and director of the Saint Michael the Archangel Organization, raises various concerns in the letter dated Nov. 5. Among the points raised are the fact that some of the priests were not accused until after they died and therefore had no chance to respond and the omission of any background information about the accusers.

More: Nashville diocese releases names of 13 former priests accused of sexually abusing minors

Benedict said no one should regard his letter to Spalding as in any way questioning the bishop's sincerity.

"I do hope," Benedict added, "you will respond to each of the questions raised in this letter."

Vatican insists on Cardinal Ladaria’s immunity in Barbarin affair

ROME (ITALY)
La Croix International

October 19, 2018

A Vatican tribunal has ruled against transmitting a summons to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith prefect Cardinal Luis Ladaria Ferrer to appear before a French court.The Holy See sent a diplomatic note to the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Sept. 17 confirming its refusal to notify Cardinal Ladaria of a summons to appear in a French court over the Cardinal Barbarin affair.Cardinal Philippe Barbarin of Lyon and other diocesan leaders have been accused of having failed...

Iowa Opens Inquiry into Clergy Abuse, SNAP Urges Full Investigation

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

November 2, 2018

Iowa’s attorney general announced that he is opening an inquiry into the handling of clergy abuse cases by Catholic dioceses throughout his state.

We are grateful that Attorney General Tom Miller has followed in the footsteps of nineteen of his colleagues across the nation and has taken the first step towards a full investigation in Iowa. To best aid this inquiry, we hope that Mr. Miller’s office will open a confidential hotline staffed by victim advocates. We believe that opening lines of communication with survivors directly is the best way to encourage survivors or others who may have suspected abuse to come forward and share information with law enforcement authorities.

According to his announcement, Mr. Miller does not have the authority to conduct a statewide investigative grand jury. We hope that he will consider taking the step that some of his colleagues experiencing similar barriers have, such as Kentucky’s Andy Beshear, in asking the state legislature to pass a bill that will grant him this authority. As seen in Pennsylvania, grand jury investigations can be incredibly powerful in both uncovering the truth and encouraging participation from survivors and advocates. Despite the barriers in front of him, we applaud Mr. Miller for beginning the investigation anyway.

U.S. Bishops To Meet Nov. 12-14 in Baltimore; Will Address Abuse Crisis

WASHINGTON (DC)
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

October 30, 2018

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) will gather for the 2018 Fall General Assembly in Baltimore, November 12-14.

The assembly will begin with an address by Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo, archbishop of Galveston-Houston and President of the USCCB and also an address by the Papal Nuncio to the United States, Archbishop Christophe Pierre. The body of bishops will then adjourn to an on-site chapel for a full day of spiritual discernment and prayer. This will be followed by a Mass celebrated Monday evening at the site of the assembly.

During the assembly the bishops will discuss and vote on a series of concrete measures to respond to the abuse crisis, including those approved for the agenda at the September meeting of the Administrative Committee, such as a third-party reporting mechanism, standards of conduct for bishops, and protocols for bishops resigned or removed because of abuse. The bishops will also hear reports from the National Advisory Council and National Review Board.

The assembly will also vote on the Pastoral Letter Against Racism and will also hear a report on the 15th Ordinary Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith, and Vocational Discernment. The bishops will also vote on the 2019 budget.


Memphis Catholic activist questions name release of accused priests

MEMPHIS (TN)
Commercial Appeal

November 5, 2018

By Ron Maxey

The director of a Memphis-based Catholic organization has sent an open letter to Bishop J. Mark Spalding of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Nashville questioning last week's name release of 13 former priests accused of sexually abusing minors.

Patrick Benedict, a layperson and director of the Saint Michael the Archangel Organization, raises various concerns in the letter dated Nov. 5. Among the points raised are the fact that some of the priests were not accused until after they died and therefore had no chance to respond and the omission of any background information about the accusers.

More: Nashville diocese releases names of 13 former priests accused of sexually abusing minors

Benedict said no one should regard his letter to Spalding as in any way questioning the bishop's sincerity.

"I do hope," Benedict added, "you will respond to each of the questions raised in this letter."

Benedict, who says he lives within the Catholic Diocese of Memphis, said by email Monday afternoon that he had no comment beyond what was in his letter.

Who will protect sheep from shepherds? Inquirer and Globe team spotlights sins of many bishops

GET RELIGION

November 5, 2018

By Terry Mattingly

I’m not sure that we’re talking about a true sequel to the massive 2002 Boston Globe “Spotlight” series about sexual abuse of children and teens by Catholic priests.

Still, there’s no question that journalists at The Philadelphia Inquirer and the Globe have — working together — produced a disturbing report documenting the efforts of many U.S. Catholic bishops to hide abusive priests or, at the very least, to avoid investigations of their own sins and crimes during these scandals.

The dramatic double-decker headline at the Inquirer says a lot, pointing readers to the key fact — that U.S. bishops keep stressing that only Rome’s powers that be can discipline bishops, archbishops and cardinals::

America’s Catholic bishops vowed to remove abusive priests in 2002. In the years that followed, they failed to police themselves.

For the most part, this report avoids pinning simplistic political and doctrinal labels on Catholic shepherds who are, to varying degrees, involved in this story.

If you know any of the players mentioned in this report, you will recognize that it offers more evidence — as if it was needed — that this scandal is too big to be described in terms of “left” and “right.”.

I am sure that critics more qualified than me will find some holes and stereotypes. Experts will be able to connect the dots and see the networks that protected abusers or even produced them. Informed readers can do this, because the Globe-Inquirer team consistently names names. We will come back to one interesting exception to that rule.

Eight Catholic priests with Memphis assignments on list of abuse allegations

MEMPHIS (TN)
Daily Memphian

November 5, 2018

By Bill Dries

Three of eight former Roman Catholic priests connected to the Catholic Diocese of Nashville accused of child sexual abuse and dismissed from the priesthood had church assignments in Memphis.

They are included in a longer list released Friday in Nashville of 13 priests accused of child sexual abuse. Until the establishment of the separate Diocese of Memphis in 1971, the Nashville Diocese covered the entire state of Tennessee.

The list includes Paul W. St. Charles, who was the first director of the Catholic Youth Office for the new Memphis Diocese. St. Charles, ordained in 1966, had six civil lawsuits filed against him in Shelby County Circuit Court alleging child sexual abuse while he was a priest in Memphis. The lawsuits followed St. Charles’ suspension from all priestly duties in 2004 by then-Memphis Bishop J. Terry Steib.

UPDATE: Retired Clinton priest accused of sexual abuse; survivors network urges more disclosure

PEORIA (IL)
Herald & Review

November 2, 2018

By Maria Nagle

The Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests wants to know what prompted the Peoria Catholic Diocese to order three retired priests to step down now from public ministry when they face credible allegations of sexual abuse from decades ago.

"The big question is, Why now? What they are doing now, it seems, is unloading these secret crimes from decades ago that they swept under the rug," SNAP spokesman Kate Bochte said. "It's possibly because they know the attorney general is investigating these crimes now.

"I've heard from many survivors and their No. 1 concern is that this stops — that not another child is violated by any priest," said Bochte, speaking from Chicago on Friday. "A big part of that is also holding perpetrators accountable and exposing the crimes."

Former Loyola president and professor named in clergy sex abuse list

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Loyola Maroon

November 2, 2018

By Rose Wagner

Two priests who previously worked for Loyola were among the 57 clergy members who the Archdiocese of New Orleans identified as being taken out of ministry due to accusations of sexual abuse of minors.

The list was released Nov. 2, and included six people identified as Jesuits.

Among the Loyola-related priests was Bernard Knoth, who served as president of Loyola from 1995 to 2003, when he resigned amid a sexual abuse complaint regarding an allegation from 1986. The allegation involved a former student at Brebeuf Preparatory School in Indianapolis, Indiana where Knoth served as the principal at the time, according to a 2003 article in The Maroon.

According to the Archdiocese, Knoth was taken out of ministry in 2002. He resigned from his position at Loyola in 2003.

Letter: Forces behind lawsuits care nothing about abuse [Opinion]

SPRINGFIELD (IL)
The State Journal-Register

November 3, 2018

An attorney filed a lawsuit claiming Catholic clergy sexual abuse against every Catholic diocese in Illinois to “force each diocese to make public the names of all priests, living and dead, accused of child molestation.” It accuses two dead priests who can neither admit guilt nor claim innocence.

Catholic spokespersons refuted the suit’s claims with legal records and websites.

The suit appears based on a presumption of guilt until proven innocent of a never-ending series of charges, a strategy used by progressives to discredit conservatives. The real goal appears to be to silence pro-life Catholic voices like Bishop Thomas Paprocki locally and Pastor Frank Pavone of Priests for Life at the national level. In 1994 Pastor Pavone met with Mother Teresa, who subsequently wrote “I hope that many priests and deacons will join the Priests for Life.”

The attorney falsely claimed Bishop Paprocki “ascribed survivors coming forward to be devils.” The bishop said the “force behind (sex-abuse lawsuits) is ... the devil” for burdening whole congregations and charitable organizations. The bishop attacked the suits’ motivation, not the survivors.

‘Semblance of Truth,’ the Church’s Standard of Evidence in Sex-Abuse Cases

NEW YORK (NY)
National Review

November 3, 2018

By Nicholas Frankovich

Diocesan review boards are not criminal court — and shouldn’t be.

Most people who allege that they were sexually abused by Catholic priests are telling the truth. The record that has accrued over decades of investigation by the Church itself is clear on that point, though only if you accept an evidentiary standard that’s too low for most cases to result in conviction or make it to trial at all in a criminal or even civil court. So what does William McSwain hope to accomplish?

McSwain, the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, last month asked the U.S. bishops to preserve their files on sex-abuse complaints. On the same day, October 9, he sent to each of Pennsylvania’s eight dioceses a subpoena for any records that might shed light on alleged sexual abuse by clergy or on efforts by diocesan officials to cover it up.

He seeks records dating back only to 2001, even though the great bulk of cases for which the Church is still under the spotlight relate to sexual misconduct that is alleged to have occurred well before then, mostly in the 1960s through the 1980s. Moreover, for federal prosecution of the sexual abuse of anyone under 18, no statute of limitations applies during the victim’s lifetime. Why then did McSwain not subpoena relevant records from the 20th century as well?

Karadima victims file complaint against Cardinal Errázuriz

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Catholic News Agency

November 2, 2018

They are accusing the cardinal of perjury

Three victims of former Chilean priest Fernando Karadima filed a complaint last week against Cardinal Francisco Javier Errázuriz Ossa, accusing him of perjury in the civil suit for compensation for damages filed against the Archdiocese of Santiago.

The complaint was filed in a Santiago court Oct. 25 by attorney Juan Pablo Hermosilla, representing Juan Carlos Cruz, José Andrés Murillo, and James Hamilton.

The legal action states that in September 2015 Cardinal Errázuriz, Archbishop Emeritus of Santiago, gave a statement as a witness under oath which “in the light of subsequent facts constitutes the crime of perjury.”

In his statement, the cardinal said that when he was Achbishop of Santiago, “in June 2006, I did not close the process (against Karadima) but put it on hold; the resignation of the priest from the parish is for them to decide.”

Archbishop Nienstedt denies sexual misconduct allegations in Vatican lawsuit

TWIN CITIES (MN)
The Catholic Spirit

November 2, 2018

By Maria Wiering

Archbishop Emeritus John Nienstedt defended himself Oct. 24 from renewed allegations that he has engaged in sexual misconduct and that his judgment in the case of a former priest who sexually abused three boys was influenced by an “unusual social relationship” with him.

The allegations are part of a lawsuit filed against the Vatican Oct. 24 by Jeff Anderson, a St. Paul attorney. Its two plaintiffs include Jim Keenan, a sexual abuse survivor from the Twin Cities. Filed in U.S. District Court-Northern District of California, Anderson’s lawsuit is the third he’s filed against the Vatican. Courts have dismissed both of the two previous suits.

The lawsuit seeks the release of Vatican-held documents in its archives pertaining to clergy sex abuse.

The lawsuit cites the internal investigation commissioned in 2014 by the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis into allegations that Archbishop Nienstedt engaged in sexual misconduct with adults prior to being named Archbishop of St. Paul and Minneapolis. That investigation produced affidavits alleging that Archbishop Nienstedt had sexually harassed and propositioned adult males and frequented gay establishments in Canada and Detroit.

Clergy abuse survivors urge state Senate to return and vote on lawsuit bill

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Trib Live

October 31, 2018

By Deb Erdley

Clergy sexual abuse survivors say they have the votes to pass a state bill establishing a window for older victims to sue their abusers, and they’re challenging the Pennsylvania Senate to return to Harrisburg for a vote.

“We have the votes. The votes are there to pass SB 261 as it stands,” said Ryan O’Connor. “We just need the majority to allow it to come to a vote.”

O’Connor, 47, of Verona, who has written of his abuse as a child at the hands of a parish priest in Johnstown, is traveling the state with Jim Van Sickle, another survivor who serves as Survivor Advocacy Coordinator for Stop Child Predator, a national nonprofit group.

“There is a lot of support in the Senate for this bill, and we’re asking that they return and vote on it,” Van sickle said.

Lawsuit alleges predator priest sexually abused two in Riverside after previous suspension

LOS ANGELES (CA)
Palm Springs Desert Sun

November 1, 2018

By Christopher Damien

Two brothers claim in a civil suit that Carlos Rene Rodriguez, a former Roman Catholic priest who spent time in prison from 2004 to 2008 for child sexual assault, abused them as children in the early 1990s, while he was ministering at churches in Riverside.

The lawsuit includes documents that show the church had already known Rodriguez had a past of sexual abuse. Church leaders had sent Rodriguez to a treatment center for troubled priests and stripped Rodriguez of his religious order. The lawsuit also accuses Rodriguez of violating church orders not to minister, due to his previous sexual abuse.

The lawsuit comes just three weeks after Bishop Gerald Barnes' Oct. 8 release of a list of credible child sexual abuse claims against priests who were part of the Diocese of San Bernardino. The detailed court filings allege that Rodriguez's pattern of horrific abuse extended into churches in Riverside County.

Anthony DeMarco, the lawyer representing the two plaintiffs identified only as John Does, questions why the Diocese of San Bernardino failed to see that the Archdiocese of Los Angeles had documented evidence of Rodriguez's sexual abuse before he began ministering in Riverside.

Report names clergy accused of abusing orphans, troubled children

MARRERO (LA)
The Advocate

November 3, 2018

By Matt Sledge

The grand Spanish Colonial Revival buildings of Madonna Manor and Hope Haven that stand on opposite sides of Barataria Boulevard in Marrero are largely vacant now, empty but still-imposing monuments of Catholicism in the New Orleans area.

For decades, they housed orphans and children from troubled families, all placed into the care of the church. But their ornate facades concealed a grotesque pattern of physical and sexual abuse perpetrated by priests, brothers and nuns.

While the scandal there cost the Archdiocese of New Orleans and other entities $5.2 million in 2009, Friday was the first time the archdiocese named alleged abusers there, along with dozens of priests and other clergy that church officials determined were credibly accused of the sexual abuse of minors.

At least 65 people have alleged that as children, they suffered abuse, including whipping, molestation or worse, while confined to the 10-acre campus of Hope Haven and Madonna Manor between the 1940s and 1970s.

One of them, 66-year-old Louis Cantero, still gets a chill whenever he drives past the complex.

“I didn’t realize how much damage that did to me until later in life,” he said.

They sued the Catholic church anonymously. Now Springfield couple wants their story heard.

SPRINGFIELD (MO)
Springfield News-Leader

November 3, 2018

By Giacomo Bologna

It was cold and windy on Saturday morning as Gail Herbert stood outside the Catholic Center in Springfield, the place where she says she was sexually abused by a top diocesan official.

Gail Herbert and her husband, Jon, no longer want to be anonymous.

As the Herberts spoke about their "Jane Doe" lawsuit and the abuse allegedly perpetrated by the former director of family ministry for the Springfield-Cape Girardeau Catholic Diocese, Bishop Edward Rice came outside.

Rice appeared to record them with his cellphone.

A Lourdes, les victimes de pédophilie réclament « des actes » à l’Eglise catholique

[In Lourdes, victims of pedophilia testify in front of Catholic bishops]

FRANCE
Le Monde

November 4, 2018

By Cécile Chambraud

Huit personnes ayant subi des violences sexuelles de la part de clercs ont témoigné lors de l’assemblée plénière d’automne des évêques de France.

A Lourdes (Hautes-Pyrénées), cette année, ils sont « les invités » des évêques catholiques. C’est de cette manière que Mgr Luc Crépy, président de la Cellule permanente de lutte contre la pédophilie (CPLP), a présenté les victimes de violences sexuelles de la part de clercs. Huit d’entre elles, hommes et femmes, étaient conviées à témoigner devant les 118 prélats, répartis en quatre groupes, à l’occasion de l’assemblée plénière d’automne des évêques de France, samedi 3 novembre.

Pédophilie : deux cent onze témoignages de victimes recensés par l’Eglise depuis 2017

[Pedophilia: French Church tallies 211 testimonies of victims claiming abuse since 2017]

FRANCE
Le Monde

October 31, 2018

By Louise Couvelaire

Selon un rapport de l’épiscopat publié mardi, 129 prêtres ou diacres ont été mis en cause par un témoignage, dont dix ont été mis en examen et quatre incarcérés.

L’Eglise catholique française poursuit son opération de transparence. A quelques jours de la Conférence des évêques de France (CEF), à Lourdes, au cours de laquelle des victimes d’abus sexuels seront pour la première fois invitées à témoigner, l’épiscopat a publié, mardi 30 octobre, un second rapport sur la lutte contre la pédophilie dans l’Eglise.

Fiscal Abbott suspende a jefe de delitos sexuales por denuncia de acoso sexual

[National prosecutor suspends head of sex crimes for sexual harassment complaint]

CHILE
El Mostrador

November 5, 2018

El fiscal nacional encargó una investigación administrativa al jefe de la unidad de Lavado de dinero, Delitos Económicos y Crimen Organizado, Mauricio Fernández.

El fiscal nacional Jorge Abbott suspendió al director de la Unidad Especializada en Derechos Humanos, Violencia de Género y Delitos Sexuales de la Fiscalía Nacional, Luis Torres González, luego que una estudiante en práctica presentara una denuncia en su contra por acoso sexual.

Sacerdote víctima de Karadima habla de "dictadura espiritual" y dice que abusos siguen ocurriendo en la Iglesia

[Priest victim of Karadima speaks of "spiritual dictatorship" and says abuses continue in the Church]

SANTIAGO, CHILE
Emol

November 4, 2018

By Leonardo Vallejos

El presbitero Eugenio de la Fuente se declara como un "sobreviviente de graves abusos de poder y conciencia".

El presbitero Eugenio de la Fuente, una de las víctimas religiosas de Fernando Karadima, insistió en sus críticas contra el ex sacerdote. En una carta enviada a El Mercurio hace un resumen histórico con todos los hitos que han tenido las denuncias contra el otrora párroco de El Bosque y aprovecha de cuestionar el rol de la Iglesia.

Victims hope meeting with French bishops will lead to concrete action

FRANCE
La Croix International

November 5, 2018

By Céline Hoyeau

Participants hope for a deep change in awareness and in the practice of the Church to prevent and deal with assaults and sexual crimes

French bishops collectively met with victims of clerical sexual abuse for the first time for a session of testimony and discussion that participants later described as of “rare quality.”

Véronique Garnier, who was abused by a priest for two years from the age of 13, says she survived for years in what she described as “deadly silence” because “no one wanted to listen to us.”

Now, she says that she was impressed by the “totally different kind of silence, a great silence” that reigned during her meeting with 30 French bishops gathered in a circle around her at the beginning of their Plenary Assembly in Lourdes on Saturday Nov. 3.

Accused clergy served at Cardinal Mooney, Ursuline, Holy Family, among other parishes

YOUNGSTOWN (OH)
WKBN

November 1, 2018

The Youngstown Diocese released the assignments for those accused of sex abuse

On Tuesday, Bishop George Murry released the names of 34 religious leaders removed due to sexual misconduct within the Youngstown Diocese since 1943.

The diocese has now released the parishes where each served.

Harrisburg diocese vows transparency, but uses political strategist to control its message

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

November 2, 2018

By Candy Woodall

A YDR analysis shows the Diocese of Harrisburg continues to put a high priority on protecting its image.

Since releasing a long list of priests accused of child sexual abuse, the Diocese of Harrisburg has repeatedly vowed to be open and transparent.

Bishop Ronald Gainer has said his church’s darkest days are sins of the past.

But the Harrisburg diocese doesn’t have to look beyond last week to find evidence that it's breaking its own promises of transparency to the public.

On multiple days in late October, the diocese wouldn't answer when or why it hired a Republican strategist, lobbyist and crisis communicator to protect its image while claiming to put survivors first.

A York Daily Record analysis shows the Diocese of Harrisburg continues to put a high priority on protecting its image while not answering questions that are a matter of public safety.

Pope Francis' struggle to bring forth a synodal Church

UNITED STATES
La Croix International

November 5, 2018

By Massimo Faggioli

Synodality for Francis is not just a form of Church government but a way of being Church

The most visible critique of the just concluded Synod of Bishops’ assembly on young people has focused on sections in the final document that call for a strengthening of synodality at all levels of the Church.

It is absolutely surprising how very little so many bishops know about synodality, a method Pope Francis has sought to develop throughout his pontificate and a concept Catholic theologians have been discussing for at least a couple of decades.

In order to understand how the pope’s ecclesiology is currently being received, we should look back at the concept of episcopal collegiality as it was introduced at the Second Vatican Council (1962-65).

Canadian diocese wins case over sex abuse payouts

TORONTO (CANADA)
Catholic News Service

November 5, 2018

By Michael Swan

In a decision that confirms its right to proactively reach out to victims of sexual abuse by priests, the Catholic Diocese of Bathurst, New Brunswick, has been awarded $3.4 million in a dispute with its insurance company.

Following the Oct. 18 decision by the New Brunswick Court of Appeal, the insurer, Aviva Canada, said it would take time to consider appealing to the Supreme Court of Canada. It has 60 days from the date of the decision.

The dispute centers around a case first heard in 2016 in which payments were made to more than 90 victims of predator priests covering a period of decades beginning in the 1950s. As the scope of abuse over the history of the diocese became apparent to Archbishop Valery Vienneau of Moncton, then the bishop of Bathurst, he hired retired Supreme Court judge Michel Bastarache to lead a conciliation process in which victims would be encouraged to tell their stories to Bastarache and the judge would independently investigate and decide on a reasonable offer of compensation.

A Coach in Louisville Worked with Kids for 15 Years Despite Allegations of Abuse

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

November 5, 2018

In 2003, a popular coach at a Kentucky high school was accused of sexual abuse. Fifteen years later, he is still working around kids.

The grooming by Drew Conliffe described in the KyCIR article is textbook. The abuse suffered by Eric Flynn, and likely others near him, is all too common. Sadly, too, is the fact that this popular coach, well-known in the community, was the one who received the benefit of the doubt over the victim. Despite the fact that other parents in the community apparently saw warning signs, it was ultimately the perpetrator who was believed and not the victim.

This story speaks to the importance of changing culture to stop and prevent sexual abuse. If we lived in a society where victims, especially children, were believed when they came forward, it is likely that Conliffe would not have been able to work around children for another 15 years. If we lived in a culture where sexual assault was understood to be common and not something to be joked about, it is possible that Flynn and other victims would have felt empowered in coming forward and sharing what happened to them, not ashamed. Perhaps then, allegations of abuse would have come into the light and been shared with all instead of needing to be shared anonymously, via windshield-wiper fliers.

More accusations uncovered in the Diocese of Buffalo

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

November 5, 2018

Even after a nationally-run expose into secret files, the spread of a federal investigation to their diocese, and a 60 minutes profile of the brave whistleblower who brought those files to light, church officials in Buffalo are still keeping secrets.

WKBW is reporting that two more priests within the Diocese of Buffalo, who have known allegations of sexual misconduct against them, have been permitted to remain in ministry under Bishop Robert Malone. In response to the report, the Diocese has now placed Fr. Ronald Sajdak and Msgr. Fred Liesing on administrative leave pending an investigation.

Recent history has made it clear that church officials in Buffalo have no business conducting an investigation of their own. Instead, all records related to these clergy and others who have been accused of abuse should be turned over immediately to law enforcement. Given these repeated failures to be fully open and honest – despite pledging to be exactly that in March – parishioners and citizens in Buffalo cannot trust Bishop Malone to do the right thing.

We are grateful that the NY state attorney general and U.S. Department of Justice have already opened investigations into clergy sex abuse in New York. If the revelations out of Buffalo are any indication, the investigation is sorely needed. Such an independent investigation is the only way to ensure the safety of children and vulnerable adults, the healing and support of survivors, and the confidence of citizens that the truth will carry the day.

Bishop Malone left two more accused priests in ministry despite allegations

BUFFALO (NY)
WKBW

November 4, 2018

By Charlie Spech

Buffalo Bishop Richard J. Malone made a statement Friday during his interview with WBEN radio that is now being called into question.

WBEN host David Bellavia asked the Bishop, “Are there any priests currently under your command, that have any allegations of any sort of assault against children?” Malone responded by stating: “Not that I know of.”

It now appears that statement may not be totally accurate because Msgr. Fred Leising, one of the accused priests, was saying Mass as recently as Saturday. The other accused priest was actively ministering as a pastor.

In an interview with 7 Eyewitness News on Saturday night, Msgr. Leising denied the allegation that he stuck his tongue down the throat of a teenage girl in the 1980s. But he said the diocese has known about the allegation for months and is only suspending him now in a desperate attempt at damage control.

“Yes, actually I had a funeral this morning at Nativity, where I used to be the pastor for 12 years,” Msgr. Leising told 7 Eyewitness News. “I had gotten a call from Bishop Grosz this morning telling me I was going to be put on administrative leave.”

Msgr. Leising, the former president-rector of Christ the King Seminary, says he met with Bishop Grosz about the situation months ago. Internal documents obtained by 7 Eyewitness News show the diocese knew of the allegation since April. Leising said Bishop Malone finally suspended him now - six months later - after consulting with his attorneys.

Church sanctions priest for sex-abuse petition

PARIS (FRANCE)
Associated Press

November 2, 2018

A Catholic priest said Friday that he has been punished by church leaders in France after he gathered more than 100,000 signatures for a petition calling for a cardinal to resign over his handling of child sexual abuse cases.

The Rev. Pierre Vignon said he learned in an email Thursday that he would no longer be considered for the church court where he has served as a judge since 2002.

In a phone interview, Vignon said the decision showed church leaders are of two minds about how to deal with sex predators within the Catholic clergy.

“They say, ‘We want to do everything,’ but to whistleblowers, ‘We want to shut you up,”‘ Vignon said.

The email said Vignon was no longer a church judge but did not explain the reason for the decision made by 12 bishops who oversee the area of southeast France where he ministers, the priest said.

Letter to US Ambassador to the Holy See

SEATTLE (WA)
Ending Clerical Abuse

November 5, 2018

The Honorable Callista Gingrich
United States Ambassador to the Holy See
United States Embassy to the Holy See
Via Sallustiana, 49
00187 Rome, Italy

Re: Survivors of Clergy Sexual Abuse and the U.S. Response to the Vatican

Dear Honorable Ambassador,

We are writing to you as survivors of clergy sexual abuse and human rights advocates from the United States and around the world.

On November 12, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) will be convening in Baltimore to address the crisis of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

The meeting takes place in the wake of an unprecedented formal notification by the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) directing every Catholic diocese to “not destroy, discard, dispose of, delete, or alter any” documents related to the sexual abuse of children as U.S. officials investigate “possible violations of federal law.”

We are asking you to urge Pope Francis to assert his authority and issue a clear and unambiguous directive to the American bishops to immediately comply with the DOJ notification.

Sex abuse victims rally outside Catholic Church in Norwich

NORWICH (CT)
The Day

November 3. 2018

By Greg Smith

It was a small group that stood outside the Cathedral of St. Patrick in quiet protest on Saturday with a shared hope their stories of sexual abuse at the hands of priests will have a broader statewide impact.

The rally was organized by the Connecticut Chapter of the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, SNAP, which is pushing for elimination of the statute of limitations on all sexual assault-related crimes.

The statute of limitations for sexual assault in Connecticut varies depending on the crime. While there is no limitation on serious felony sexual assaults, state law does bar criminal prosecution and civil lawsuits in certain cases of sexual abuse of a minor once the victim reaches the age of 48. It’s much shorter in other cases.

It can take decades for sexual assault victims to feel confident enough to come forward with their stories, said Lucy Nolan, director of policy and public relations with the Connecticut Alliance to End Sexual Violence.

A former Liberty University professor has been charged with soliciting sex from a minor

OREGON
Spiritual Sounding Board

November 2, 2018

Stephen James Kilpatrick, 63, “was arrested and charged with three counts each of taking indecent liberties with a child younger than 15 years old and soliciting sex from a child younger than 15 years old.”

Richmond-Times Dispatch has reported that Southern Virginia Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC) posted a Craigslist ad as a 13-yr old girl and conversed via text and e-mail for seven months.

Gardner said the conversations were often sexually explicit and Kilpatrick was told the person he was communicating with was a 13-year-old girl in the eighth grade named “Jenny.” Kilpatrick promised sexual acts to “Jenny,” drove to where he thought she lived and told her he’d thought about her sexually while in his office, according to Gardner.

Kilpatrick was a professor of physics at LU during the time of the incident but has since been fired, his family said from the witness stand Tuesday.

Kilpatrick was actively trying to set up a meeting with the girl, Gardner said, and law enforcement officers staged such a meeting in June. When they intercepted Kilpatrick, she said he had cookies and lubrication in his car.

“He didn’t stop until he saw that we were on the verge of tears”

MADRID (SPAIN)
El Pais

November 3, 2018

By Joaquin Gil

The Salesian religious order still has a priest within its ranks who is under investigation for abusing a 13-year-old child in 2013. As confirmed by EL PAÍS, Father Francisco Javier López Luna maintains an office at the National Center for Youth Pastoral Care on Calle Alcalá, in Madrid.

“López Luna this year took charge of the Salesian community, and he is a member of the Youth Pastoral Care, a body that brings together the various groups within the order,” says one of its members.

The prosecution is seeking more than four years behind bars for López Luna, who is accused of a crime against the sexual integrity of a minor as well as degrading treatment.

During the school year 2012-2013, Manolo – a pseudonym – was studying his second year of high school at the Salesian School in Cádiz. He was then 13 and going three times a week to the principal’s office. The principal at the time was Francisco Javier López Luna. “When he touched me, he would bite his lip; he enjoyed it,” Manolo says, speaking out for the first time after two years in therapy.

Chile’s lay people share their vision of Church reform

DENVER (CO)
Crux

November 5, 2018

By Inés San Martín

Amid an unprecedented crisis in the Catholic Church in Chile, lay people tired of waiting for deeper change are organizing themselves.

After the extent of sexual abuse cover-up was made known, every bishop submitted his resignation to Pope Francis. He’s accepted seven, with several more expected.

“We agree with Pope Francis that we must not get bogged down in the quicksand of desolation, protest and simple complaining, but rather it is time to make constructive suggestions as to what needs to be done,” says a letter written by some of Chile’s most influential Catholic lay people.

The missive is, in many ways, a response to Francis’s address to the bishops of Chile when he was in the country last January.

Lists May Not Tell Full Story

WHEELING (WV)
Intelligencer

November 4, 2018

By Mike Myer

He was a teenager during the 1960s, my caller said. He had a driver’s license and access to a car, so friends sometimes asked him for rides. One asked every week.

They would drive to a Roman Catholic Church in our area, during the early evening. The friend would get out and go into the church. My caller waited in the car.

After awhile, the boy would come out of the church and get back into the car. He would have $20 in small bills. Of that, he gave my caller $5 for the ride.

A priest had paid him for a sex act, performed inside the church.

57 clergy members ‘credibly accused’ of abuse in New Orleans area since 1950, archdiocese says in releasing names

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Times-Picayune

By Kim Chatelain

Nov 2, 2018

The Archdiocese of New Orleans on Friday (Nov. 2) released the names of 57 Roman Catholic clergy members “credibly accused” of abusing minors over many decades in southeast Louisiana, answering a clarion call for transparency in a scandal that has rocked the world’s largest Christian church.

All of the credibly accused clergy members are either deceased or have been removed from the ministry, Archbishop Gregory Aymond said. The names have been turned over to the New Orleans District Attorney’s Office and will be made available to any other district attorney in the area. The New Orleans DA issued a statement Friday morning saying it is willing to take part in investigations as needed.

'What did we do?': Anger, shock from parents who unwittingly housed sexually abusive Iowa priest

DES MOINES (IA)
Des Moines Register

November 2, 2018

By Tyler J Davis

Reuben and Tania Ortiz were remorseful and wondering: Did we really invite a sexual predator to sleep under the same roof as our children?

Reuben said he had to patrol his own house, installing locks on bedroom doors and sleeping in his living room to keep watch on his 13-, 15- and 17-year-olds. Now, he worries that his efforts weren't enough to protect his kids from admitted pedophile the Rev. Jerome Coyle.

“We knew (Coyle) for 13 years and he really spent a lot of time with us … in fact, people would even say ‘Hey, where’s Jerry?’ because he would go places with us," Reuben said from his New Mexico home Wednesday. "He had already spent time, even by himself, with our (kids), at times; I don't know what he did."

Reuben said he spoke with his children after he was informed of the 85-year-old's actions as an Iowa priest. Coyle admitted in the 1980s to attraction to or sexual contact with about 50 boys in central and western Iowa over a span of 20-plus years.

Orphanage at epicenter of priest sex abuse scandal in New Orleans

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
WTMA TV

November 3, 2018

Eight of the 57 members of the clergy who have been credibly accused of sexually abusing minors worked at a Marrero orphanage, according to the Archdiocese of New Orleans.

All eight priests were Salesians, members of a religious order founded in Italy by St. John Bosco.

On November 2, Archbishop Gregory Aymond released the names of the 57 priests, deacons, clergy, and religious order priests who have been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse of a minor since 1950.

Eight priests, accounting for about 14 percent of those named, were either stationed solely at Hope Haven orphanage on Barataria Boulevard in Marrero or worked there in addition to other assignments in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s.

Priest removed from Oklahoma ministry pending investigation of child sexual abuse

OKLAHOMA CITY (OK)
News Channel 4

November 4, 2018

By Lili Zheng

A Catholic priest in the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City has been removed from ministry pending an investigation of an alleged sexual abuse of a minor.

The announcement was posted on the archdiocese's website stating the removal of Rev. James Mickus who serves as pastor of Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church in Chandler and Saint Louis Catholic Church in Stroud.

We're told Archbishop Paul Coakley informed parishioners in person Sunday morning.

According to the statement, the allegation does not involve Mickus’s current parishes and is under review by the archdiocesan Review Board. The board was created in 2002 under the “Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People” to review allegations of abuse and advise the archbishop.

Catholic bishops promised reform in sex-abuse scandal. But they didn’t look at their own misdeeds

BOSTON (MA)
Boston Globe

November 3, 2018

By Jenn Abelson, Thomas Farragher of the Globe Staff, Jeremy Roebuck, Julia Terruso and William Bender of the Philadelphia Inquirer Staff

Bishop Robert Finn wasn’t going anywhere.

He never alerted authorities about photos of young girls’ genitals stashed on a pastor’s laptop. He kept parishioners in the dark, letting the priest mingle with children and families. Even after a judge found the bishop guilty of failing to report the priest’s suspected child abuse — and after 200,000 people petitioned for his ouster — he refused to go.

“I got this job from John Paul II. There’s his signature right there,” Finn had told a prospective deacon shortly after the priest’s arrest in 2011, pointing to the late pontiff’s photo. “And that’s who I answer to.”

Sixteen years after the clergy sexual abuse crisis exploded in Boston, the American Catholic Church is again mired in scandal. This time, the controversy is propelled not so much by priests in the rectories as by the leadership, bishops across the country who like Finn have enabled sexual misconduct or in some cases committed it themselves.

More than 130 US bishops — or nearly one-third of those still living — have been accused during their careers of failing to adequately respond to sexual misconduct in their dioceses, according to a Boston Globe and Philadelphia Inquirer examination of court records, media reports, and interviews with church officials, victims, and attorneys.

At least 15, including Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, the former archbishop of Washington who resigned in July, have themselves been accused of committing such abuse or harassment.

Most telling, the analysis shows that the claims against more than 50 bishops center on incidents that occurred after a historic 2002 Dallas gathering of US bishops where they promised that the church’s days of concealment and inaction were over. By an overwhelming, though not unanimous, vote, church leaders voted to remove any priest who had ever abused a minor and set up civilian review boards to investigate clergy misconduct claims.

But while they imposed new standards that led to the removal of hundreds of priests, the bishops specifically excluded themselves from the landmark child protection measures.

Four pedophile ex-priests had their professional licenses granted under Gov. Scott Walker's administration

MILWAUKEE (WI)
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

November 2, 2018

By Daniel Bice

Gov. Scott Walker's campaign has spent the past year accusing Democratic foe Tony Evers of putting children in danger by not stripping the licenses of teachers found guilty of improper and immoral acts.

But it turns out that the second-term Republican governor's administration has its own serious lapse involving the professional licenses of individuals of highly questionable character.

Records show one of Walker's agencies — the state Department of Safety and Professional Services — either gave licenses to or renewed the licenses of four ex-priests who were defrocked for sexually abusing children.

The four former pedophile priests from the Milwaukee Archdiocese were given state approval to practice such professions as social work, nursing, alcohol and drug counseling and funeral work. All four appear on the archdiocese's list of former Milwaukee priests with a "substantiated case of sexual abuse of a minor."

After learning of the issue this week, Walker moved to strip the four of their state credentials.

Divisions at synod on sex abuse send wrong message, survivor says

DENVER (CO)
Crux

November 5, 2018

By Elise Harris

Denise Buchanan, a survivor of clerical sexual abuse and advocate for fellow victims, has said she was disappointed in the handling of the issue during last month’s Synod of Bishops on youth, and that a lack of a unified consensus is thwarting any progress that could be made.

With some bishops making vocal apologies for the Church’s failures and others trying to downplay the problem, depicting it as a mainly Western issue, it’s clear that prelates “don’t know what to do,” Buchanan said.

Speaking to Crux over the phone from Los Angeles, she said that when the Oct. 3-28 Synod of Bishops on young people, faith and vocational discernment came to a close, “it ended with a whimper because there was no agreement on a lot of the issues they had on their agenda,” particularly clerical abuse.

“That’s very telling,” she said, “because if you have factions within global groups, within the Vatican and the Vatican hierarchy that are fighting with each other, how can there be any consensus, how can there be any way to move forward?”

Divisions at synod on sex abuse send wrong message, survivor says

DENVER (CO)
Crux

November 5, 2018

By Elise Harris

Denise Buchanan, a survivor of clerical sexual abuse and advocate for fellow victims, has said she was disappointed in the handling of the issue during last month’s Synod of Bishops on youth, and that a lack of a unified consensus is thwarting any progress that could be made.

With some bishops making vocal apologies for the Church’s failures and others trying to downplay the problem, depicting it as a mainly Western issue, it’s clear that prelates “don’t know what to do,” Buchanan said.

Speaking to Crux over the phone from Los Angeles, she said that when the Oct. 3-28 Synod of Bishops on young people, faith and vocational discernment came to a close, “it ended with a whimper because there was no agreement on a lot of the issues they had on their agenda,” particularly clerical abuse.

“That’s very telling,” she said, “because if you have factions within global groups, within the Vatican and the Vatican hierarchy that are fighting with each other, how can there be any consensus, how can there be any way to move forward?”

Our Myth, Their Lie

NEW YORK (NY)
Commonweal

November 1, 2018

By James J. Heaney

Ten years ago, I believed a myth. In the beginning, there was Vatican II. It was good but messy, and the Bad Catholics hijacked it to undermine doctrine. They took over seminaries and turned them into cesspools where heresy was mandatory and depravity rampant. Then Pope John Paul II came along. He drove out the Bad Catholics and cleaned up the seminaries. Too late! The Bad Catholics had already committed terrible crimes, which were covered up without the pope’s awareness. In 2002, their abuses exploded into public view, and the JPII Catholics got blamed for crimes committed by a dying generation of clerics. The JPII bishops took it on the chin, but they fixed the problem with the Dallas Charter. Then Benedict XVI, the great theologian, appointed orthodox bishops who would carry forward the renewal. The horrors of the Scandal were behind us. The two primordial forces of the postconciliar church, orthodoxy and heresy, had fought a great battle, and orthodoxy had been vindicated.

My diocese, the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis, was proof. In the 1980s, we were led by Archbishop John Roach. Appointed by Pope Paul VI, Roach fit the “Spirit of Vatican II” archetype to a tee. Under Roach, Saint Paul Seminary was taken over by dissenters, one of whom described the Eucharist as “cookie worship” that he had “moved beyond.” There were open homosexual affairs. Those who dared adhere to church teaching were punished.

Saint Paul soon experienced one of the first abuse scandals in the American church. For years, Roach and his cronies had secretly shuffled abusive priests between parishes. When this came out and the diocese was sued, Roach found himself under oath, where he became conveniently forgetful. The diocese lost, with the victim awarded $3.5 million—paltry by today’s standards, but shocking at the time. In response, Roach imposed “tough policies,” which won praise from newspapers. Privately, he declined to enforce them.

As anger over Catholic clergy sexual abuse intensifies, U.S. dioceses’ average financial transparency score rises only marginally

BOSTON (MA)
Voice of the Faithful

November 1, 2018

Anger over clergy sexual abuse has risen dramatically with new revelations in recent months, and Voice of the Faithful’s second annual study of U.S. Catholic dioceses’ online financial transparency, released in October, shows the average score for those dioceses rising only marginally. Voice of the Faithful has long considered secrecy surrounding Catholic Church finances to be linked to secrecy surrounding clerical sexual abuse.

The average overall score achieved by all 177 dioceses comprising the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops in Voice of the Faithful’s “Measuring and Ranking Diocesan Online Financial Transparency: 2018” was 39.7 out of 60, or 66 percent, which represents a 5 percent increase over the 2017 average score. Thirty-nine percent of dioceses still have not posted audited financial statements on their websites, and 25 percent do not post a financial report of any kind.

Much of the recent anger over clergy abuse is invested in the secrecy surrounding the abuse. “Carrying out a widespread coverup of criminal acts without access to large amounts of untraceable money is impossible,” said Margaret Roylance, Ph.D., a VOTF trustee and Finance Working Group chair.

A Louisville Family Reported Sexual Abuse By A Coach. He Worked With Kids For 15 More Years

LOUISVILLE (KY)
Center for Investigative Reporting

November 2, 2018

By R.G. Dunlop

As a high school sophomore, Eric Flynn was spiraling.

The once-stellar student was placed in less challenging classes. The gifted athlete dropped out of sports he loved. The teenager, once reserved, now punched holes in doors and threatened suicide.

He wouldn’t say why. Perplexed, his parents sought help from their son’s mentor. Drew Conliffe was quick to respond.

Sure, he’d take Eric out for a nice dinner and see what he could learn about the root of his torment. Anything to help.

At the time, Kathy Flynn thought that was a great idea. After all, everybody loved Conliffe: a basketball coach at Trinity High School, a leader in Kentucky’s junior golf world and a friend of the Flynn family.

Today, Kathy Flynn is overwhelmed with guilt.

November 4, 2018

Spain child abuse: Victims fight back and appeal for change

MADRID (SPAIN)
BBC

November 4, 2018

By James Badcock

Emiliano Álvarez says the abuse at his boarding school began at the age of 11

"The priest who tortured me is still giving Mass in the village down the road," says Emiliano Álvarez, a 52-year-old from Borrenes, north-western Spain.

Like other victims who have come forward, Mr Álvarez claims he was abused by staff at the Seminario Menor boarding school in La Bañeza, in Zamora province, and that Spain's Catholic Church authorities have done little about it.

He filed his accusation against a priest in early 2017, and is still waiting for a decision by the local ecclesiastical court in Astorga.

Mr Álvarez says he was 11 on the night he recalls being woken by the priest.

"He was pulling down the sheets and my underpants, and I was pulling them back up again and again.

"I can't remember much more about that first time, but it started to happen almost every night. Then, when I was 12, it got worse; I remember fighting to turn my hips away from him so he could not touch me."

Springfield couple reveals identities in sexual abuse lawsuit against local Catholic Church

SPRINGFIELD (MO)
KY3-TV

November 3, 2018

By Taylor Frost

Springfield couple, Gail and Jon Herbert, decided to come forward and reveal their identities after filing a lawsuit in August against the Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield-Cape Girardeau and Troy Casteel, director of family ministries, for years of sexual and emotional abuse. They hope to help someone else through their pain.

"I'm angry and I fight to not feel shame ... but I refuse to feel shame," Gail Herbert said.

Gail Herbert says the couple went to Casteel for marriage counseling beginning in 2013. He then used the information in those therapy sessions as weapons. The lawsuit says she "was sexually abused on property."

"Whenever it was happening I was feeling confused, I was feeling guilty," Gail Herbert said. "I didn't understand how I could do the things that I was doing."

The lawsuit filed in August claims top diocese officials knew this abuse was happening.

During the interview, Bishop Edward Rice, came and listened to part of the interview and appeared to record it on his phone. When approached by David Clohessy, St. Louis Director of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), Rice chose not to comment and walked away. Clohessy says he hopes Rice and other church leaders will step up to report any wrongdoing.