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December 13, 2018

Internal investigation shows two nuns allegedly embezzled funds from St. James Catholic School

REDONDO BEACH (CA)
The Beach News

December 11, 2018

By Nathaniel Percy

An internal investigation at a South Bay Catholic school found that two nuns who worked there allegedly misappropriated a “substantial” amount of funds for personal use over a period of years, a letter sent to school families Wednesday said.

It wasn’t immediately clear how much was stolen from St. James Catholic School in Torrance. A specific time period also wasn’t provided by authorities.

One of the sisters had recently retired, according to a church newsletter.

Msgr. Michael Meyers, the pastor at St. James Catholic Church in Redondo Beach, said in the letter that Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, the nuns’ order, is cooperating with the parish and the Archdiocese of Los Angeles to determine exactly how much money may have been taken by the pair.

The church in Redondo Beach oversees the operations of the elementary school located 2 miles away in Torrance.

“Our community is concerned and saddened by this situation and regret any injury to our long relationship with the families of the school,” the Order said in a statement. “The Sisters of St. Joseph both desire and intend to make complete restitution to St. James School.”

Andreatta: Time for truth, justice in Catholic clerical abuse scandal

ROCHESTER (NY)
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

December 13, 2018

By David Andreatta

In recently purging another priest from the Diocese of Rochester who was found to have abused children, Bishop Salvatore Matano issued a statement pledging to continue “the many important initiatives we have undertaken” to protect young and vulnerable people.

Among those were the creation of an independent review board to probe sex abuse allegations and advise the diocese; mandatory background checks for clerics and others in the diocese who work with children; and an established code of conduct.

Such initiatives are worthwhile, but they’ve done little to bring justice to victims and even less to restore the shattered confidence in the Catholic Church felt by many of the faithful.

For that, two things need to happen — one plausible, one implausible, and both necessary.

First, the implausible.

There needs to be a public airing of how so many pedophiles got into the priesthood, how so many bishops looked the other way, and how revelations of clerical abuse and cover-ups are still surfacing after journalists peeled back the first layer of the onion 17 years ago.

Los jesuitas de Cataluña investigarán los abusos en sus colegios en los últimos 60 años

[Jesuits of Catalonia become first order in Spain to investigate abuses in their institutions]

MADRID (SPAIN)
El País

December 13, 2018

By Íñigo Domínguez

A raíz de las informaciones de EL PAÍS, admiten que "aún hay una asignatura pendiente en la investigación del pasado" y que la gestión de los casos "ha podido ser deficiente"

Los jesuitas de Cataluña serán la primera orden religiosa en España, y la primera institución de la Iglesia católica en el país, en emprender una investigación interna rigurosa de los posibles abusos sexuales sobre menores cometidos en sus centros. En la línea de las iniciativas realizadas en Francia y Alemania, y mientras la Conferencia Episcopal española se niega todavía a dar ese paso, la Compañía de Jesús y Jesuïtes Educació anuncian en un comunicado que han decidido "emprender una investigación más sistemática de los posibles casos de abusos sobre menores y conductas impropias que en el pasado, remontándonos a los años sesenta, hayan podido suceder en los centros educativos". La decisión ha sido tomada a raíz de las informaciones publicadas en EL PAÍS que afectan a su orden: "La búsqueda de información sobre algún caso ya conocido nos muestra que necesitamos sistematizar la información que pueda haber".

Why Blaming Gay Priests for Catholic Abuse Situation Will Not Help Anything

LITTLE ROCK (AR)
Bilgrimage

December 12, 2018

By William Lindsey

As I posted my posting two days ago with an assortment of reports about the sexual abuse of vulnerable people in Christian churches, I had decided that I'd do a follow-up posting featuring some valuable commentary from Jamie Manson about Pope Francis' "worries" about gay priests. In my view, the critique/discussion of comments by top Catholic officials like the ones Francis has made to Father Fernando Prado about homosexuality and gay priests needs to go hand in hand with reports about abuse of vulnerable people in Christian churches. Where a plethora of reports from various churches, including the Catholic church, demonstrates plainly that the vulnerable people being abused by priests and pastors include females…. Demonstrating that the gays-are-the-problem analysis is a red herring if we really want to get to the root of sexual abuse of vulnerable people in faith communities….

Some very important commentary from Jamie Manson regarding Francis' muddled, bigoted, scientifically ludicrous comments about homosexuality to Father Prado:

Catholic history of New Orleans highlighted during 300th anniversary

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
Crux

December 12, 2018

By Christopher White

Thirty years ago, investigative reporter Jason Berry pioneered new territory by covering clerical sexual abuse in Louisiana. Since then, his name has become synonymous with the crisis that continues to loom over the Catholic Church today.

In his new book, City of a Million Dreams: A History of New Orleans at 300, Berry returns to his roots. In an interview with Crux, he details some of the city’s rich Catholic history, its efforts to confront race relations, and why researching some of the city’s saints proved far more fulfilling than his work in Rome.

Crux: You’ve spent decades uncovering and chronicling the Church’s shameful history of clerical sex abuse and cover-up, yet this new book switches gears to tell the story of a city - your city - New Orleans. What prompted you to write this book?

Berry: In 1985, when I began investigating clergy abuse cases in Lafayette, Louisiana my second book was heading toward publication, Up from the Cradle of Jazz: New Orleans Music Since World War II. After six years on that topic I had become intrigued with jazz funerals, how they arose, what they said about the city. As I gathered documents on clergy predators, the narrative taking shape for Lead Us Not into Temptation (1992) became hugely consuming. I came back from reporting trips, numbed by clerical secrets and crimes, and invariably attended the funeral of a musician. As the mourners danced in the streets, I felt strangely happy. My own church made me sad. The city of my birth was sending rhythms of spiritual hope.

Pope Francis has the chance to repair Catholicism at upcoming World Youth Day

NEW YORK (NY)
The Media Project

December 12, 2018

By Clemente Lisi

The attention of the Catholic world will be on Panama next month when the Central American nation hosts World Youth Day, an event that remains a major part of Saint Pope John Paul II’s legacy.

Started in 1985 and influenced by the “Light-Life Movement” that began in the then-pope’s native Poland two decades earlier, World Youth Day has allowed the church to spread its message directly to young adults who eagerly gather to celebrate as a community. It is that spirit and tradition that accompanies World Youth Day each time it is held somewhere in the world. The five-day event, which starts on Jan. 22, will be a real chance for Pope Francis to try and set things right following a very difficult 2018 for him and the church as a whole.

There is a spiritual hunger around the world by Christians of all denominations. This pope needs to get back to basics and focus on evangelizing like John Paul II did during his 17-year papacy. This Holy Father needs to be less political and more spiritual. He needs to break free from the labels that have been heaped on him by critics and supporters alike. He needs to get back to the universal message of the church that resonates in both industrialized nations and the developing world.

This pope has been a polarizing figure among the faithful. He’s been on the receiving end of much criticism in recent years from conservative Catholics who increasingly believe his mixed messages on homosexuality, birth control and allowing those who have divorced to receive communion runs counter to the catechism.

At the same time, Pope Francis has often demonstrated himself to be a champion of liberal causes and seen by progressive Catholics as someone charting the church on a radically new course more in line with the needs and wants of a modern secular world.

For example, asking “who am I to judge?” in a 2013 news conference when referring to the LGBTQ community has been largely welcomed by non-Catholics and the secular news media. In January 2014, Francis even made the cover of Rolling Stone magazine in a piece that praised him and largely attacked his predecessor Pope Benedict XVI.

Teenager was raped in 1970s by high-ranking Salesian priest in Marrero, lawsuit says

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Advocate

December 12, 2018

By Ramon Antonio Vargas

A Louisiana man claims in a new lawsuit that nearly 40 years ago, the regional leader of a Catholic religious order that founded Archbishop Shaw High School dosed him with what might have been chloroform and raped him.

When he confronted Catholic officials this fall about the episode, they tried to prevent it from becoming public despite treating the claim as credible, the 36-page lawsuit filed Wednesday in Orleans Parish Civil District Court says.

The man, whose identity is not revealed in the suit, demands damages from the Salesians of Don Bosco, the Archdiocese of New Orleans and officials with both organizations, including Archbishop Gregory Aymond.

The suit marks the latest legal salvo against the local Catholic Church involving decades-old allegations of clerical abuse in New Orleans and a movement from victims and their advocates to air the claims publicly.

Judge orders D.C. priest accused of assaulting two parishioners to stay in jail

WASHINGTON (DC)
Washington Post

Decmeber 13, 2018

A D.C. Catholic priest charged with sexually assaulting two female members of his parish — a 9-year-old girl and a woman — was ordered held in D.C. jail until his next hearing.

Urbano Vazquez, 46, had been allowed to avoid jail while an investigation continued, after he was charged in...

Evansville Catholic Diocese to release list of priests accused of abuse in early 2019

EVANSVILLE (IN)
Evansville Courier & Press

December 12, 2018

By Noah Stubbs

It's been nearly three months since Bishop Joseph M. Siegel announced the Catholic Diocese will collect and release the names of priests who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors over the years.

The diocese said in a news release Wednesday that the inspection of clergy records is still ongoing, and the list will be made public in the early months of 2019.

"When complete, the Diocesan Review Board and Bishop Joseph M. Siegel will review the findings to assure that they are as complete as possible," the release said.

In September, The Message — the diocese's community newspaper — reported the names had already been listed in previous editions of the publication through the years.

The September announcement came after an Evansville Diocese priest was put on administrative leave after the diocese received a report of sexual misconduct.

Father David Fleck denies the claim of sexual misconduct that allegedly happened decades ago, according to the statement from the diocese.

St. Xavier HS to release names of priests, educators accused of sexual abuse

CINCINNATI (OH)
WLWT TV

December 12, 2018

By Emily Wood

St. Xavier High School is informing parents, students and alumni about a list of names of alleged sexual abusers.

The list is expected to be released Monday by the U.S. Midwest Province of the Society of Jesus. In an email, St. X wrote, "the Province will release the names of all Jesuit priests, brothers and scholastics under the jurisdiction of the Province who have been the subject of credible allegations of sexual abuse against minors during the period from 1955 until the present."

The email said St. Xavier is releasing the list "in an effort to be transparent about the past, to precipitate victims who desire assistance and make the intent to protect youth unmistakable."

The release will include names of Jesuits who were assigned to St. Xavier during their alleged abuse.

Gerry Ahrens is a St. Xavier graduate and a sexual abuse survivor.

He told WLWT Monday will be a great day because victims will finally have acknowledgement of what happened to them by publishing the names of their abusers.

San Diego Priest's Accuser Testifies in Court

SAN DIEGO (CA)
NBC 7 TV

December 12, 2018

An attorney and former U.S. Naval officer who was studying to become a priest accused a San Diego-area priest of grabbing his genitals after a night of drinking in a Carlsbad restaurant and bar.

Rev. Juan Garcia Castillo, a former associate pastor at St. Patrick's Catholic Church in Carlsbad, is accused of misdemeanor sexual battery for the incident that is alleged to have occurred on Feb. 4.

A 34-year-old testified in court Wednesday that he was a seminary student when he joined Castillo, 35, and another seminary student for a beer at BJ's in Carlsbad.

Surveillance video shows the three men sitting for more than four hours drinking and talking.

After two hours at the restaurant, the accuser estimated he had finished two and was drinking a third Long Island Iced Teas.

"I was drunk but I knew what was happening," he said from the stand.

Attorney asks for mercy for former Lower Burrell 'predator priest'

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Tribune Review

December 12, 2018

By Rich Cholodofsky

The lawyer for a disgraced Catholic Diocese of Greensburg priest who pleaded guilty to molesting a Lower Burrell school student a quarter-century ago pleaded for mercy for his client before a sentencing hearing next week.

In court documents filed Wednesday, defense attorney Fran Murrman asked for no jail time for the Rev. John Thomas Sweeney.

Murrman said Sweeney, 75, is mentally fragile and, through his impending banishment from the church, understands that he will “never escape the consequences of his action.”

Sweeney pleaded guilty in July to one felony count of indecent assault in connection with what investigators said was a sexual assault against a 10-year-old boy who attended St. Margaret Mary Church school between September 1991 and June 1992.

Prosecutors said Sweeney forced the fourth-grader to perform sex acts in a conference room next to his office at the church.

Sweeney had ordered the boy to the room to be disciplined for being disruptive on a school bus, investigators said.

Afterward, a church secretary brought the boy milk and cookies, according to prosecutors.

Diocese Won't Comment On Third-Party Investigation Bid

MORRISTOWN (TN)
Citizen Tribune

December 12, 2018

By Ken Little

The Diocese of Knoxville has no plans to investigate any allegations of sexual abuse by priests committed within the diocese after 1988, a spokesman said.

The diocese, which includes Greene County, also declined to respond to a request for an investigation by an independent third party of any allegations of sexual misconduct by priests. The request was made by a member of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests group, known by the acronym SNAP.

“Should there be a third party investigation begun to get to the whole truth? Survivors and their advocates unanimously promote this as the next step in getting to the truth in Tennessee,” East Tennessee SNAP advocate Susan Vance recently said.

In November, the Diocese of Nashville released a list of 13 alleged pedophile priests and former priests.

Nine of the 13 priests and former priests are dead. Two others are in prison. None are in active ministry, the Diocese of Nashville said in a news release.

All of the alleged sexual abuse was committed before 1988, when the area currently covered by the Diocese of Knoxville was included in the Diocese of Nashville.

Four of the pastors on the list served at Notre Dame Catholic Church.

Protecting accused pedophile priests: A terrible tradition continues in Pennsylvania

PENNSYLVANIA
The Pennsylvania Record

December 12, 2018

A priest invites an 8-year-old boy into the rectory and begins to kiss him. He sticks his tongue and hands where they don’t belong after offering alcohol to the child and his friend.

The boy pushes back and escapes the situation, but his friend isn’t able to – the boy watches the priest shut the door with his friend behind it.

Outside, the boy smashes a window on the priest’s car while, inside the church, his friend is sexually abused.

A shut door and a shattered window – symbols of silence and anger.

This story is taken from a Pittsburgh lawsuit against the Catholic Church, which for decades protected more than 300 priests across Pennsylvania accused of committing heinous acts on young boys and girls, according to a grand jury report.

And in that grand jury report are more heartbreaking symbols: Where the names of 19 accused priests are listed, black bars of redaction hide them.

Because of a recent state Supreme Court decision, parishioners in five Pennsylvania dioceses will have to wonder whether the names of their current and former priests are behind those black bars of redaction.

Attorney General Josh Shapiro argued that disclosure of the names was allowed by the Grand Jury Act, but the justices ruled it would be harmful to the reputations of the anonymous accused pedophiles. Ugh.

Top Cardinals Embroiled In Sexual Abuse Scandal No Longer On Papal Council

WASHINGTON (DC)
National Public Radio

December 12, 2018

By Ian Stewart
]
The Vatican announced Wednesday that two cardinals have been let go from a papal council, the day after one of them was reportedly convicted of sexual abuse by an Australian court.

George Pell and Javier Errázuriz both served on the Council of Cardinals, a papal advisory group. Errázuriz had been accused of ignoring sexual abuse by a Chilean priest. Multiple news outlets have reported a jury unanimously found Pell guilty Tuesday of sexually assaulting children in the 1990s, although Australian officials have put a gag order on the trial.

In the announcement, the Director of the Holy See Press Office, Greg Burke, said Pell and Errázuriz had been released in October after "reflection on the work, structure and composition of the Council itself, also taking into account the advanced age of some members." Pell is 77, and Errázuriz is 85. Cardinal Laurent Monsengwo Pasinya, 79, will also not return to the council.

Burke said Pope Francis thanked the men for their service on his advisory committee at the time; others in the group had called for their departure.

Pell has said before that he is innocent of the abuse charges, which stem from his time as a priest and archbishop in Australia, calling them "relentless character assassination." He has a reputation for vigorously defending the church against accusations of sexual misconduct.

As NPR has reported, Australia is grappling with the results of a disturbing 2017 report which "found that seven percent of the country's Catholic priests between 1950 and 2010 allegedly sexually abused children, and identified 1,880 different alleged perpetrators."

Juneau clergy records reviewed after alleged Pennsylvania abuse

JUNEAU (AK)
KTVA TV

December 12, 2018

By: Chris Klint

The Roman Catholic Church in Juneau is examining its records for any possible links of current or former clergy to a vast series of cases in the Lower 48 which came to light in August.

The Diocese of Juneau announced Wednesday the appointment of a three-member commission by Bishop Andrew Bellisario. According to a decree, the independent panel will “review the personnel files of clergy and religious who have served in the Diocese,” as well as any allegations of sexual abuse by staff or volunteers since the diocese’s founding in 1951.

The commission is set to begin its work Jan. 7, with a final report due by June 1.

A database maintained by the non profit group BishopAccountability.org lists just two known cases of clergy abuse in Juneau, the most recent in 1988.

Dominique Johnson, a spokesman for the diocese, said Wednesday that no new allegations of abuse in Juneau have come to light. The commission was instead prompted, he said, by the massive allegations of Pennsylvania sex abuse involving hundreds of clergy members and more than 1,000 victims.

“We just wanted to review our files to see if any allegations have been reported involving our employees, our past employees, since the establishment of the diocese in 1951,” Johnson said.

The Archdiocese of Anchorage announced a similar review in October of any abuse allegations dating back 50 years. Anchorage’s archbishop, Paul Etienne – who barred a Wyoming bishop from public ministry over alleged abuse when Etienne served there – told KTVA last month that the move was part of a focus on transparency.

Santa Barbara Priests Named in New Abuse Reports

SANTA BARBARA (CA)
Santa Barbara Independent

December 13, 2018

by Tyler Hayden

New disclosures by the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and the Catholic Church’s western Jesuit province have identified more than 200 clergymen accused of child molestation, 12 of whom held lengthy postings in the Santa Barbara area dating back to the 1950s.

The names were made public for the first time this week as part of what church officials described as atonement for the revelations of clergy sex abuse that have roiled the Catholic Church the last two decades, including the longtime protection of predator priests by some of the institution’s top leaders. The names were added to a list that was initially published by the Archdiocese in 2004 and hadn’t been updated since 2008.

“We owe it to the victim-survivors to be fully transparent in listing the names of those who perpetrate this abuse,” said L.A. Archbishop José H. Gomez in a prepared statement. “It is inconceivable that someone entrusted with the pastoral care of a child could be capable of something so harmful,” said Rev. Scott Santarosa, the head of the western Jesuit province. “Yet, tragically, this is a part of our Jesuit history, a legacy we cannot ignore.”

Victim advocates, however, called the release a self-serving strategy to shield the church from further scrutiny and potential criminal prosecution after a Pennsylvania grand jury issued a searing report in August that described how bishops in the state covered up child sexual abuse by more than 300 priests over 70 years. It was the most expansive investigation yet by a U.S. government agency of child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church.

Child abuse: Chilean cardinal removed from Pope’s inner circle

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Santiago Times

December 12, 2018

Pope Francis has removed two prominent cardinals from his inner circle months after they were hit by pedophile scandals, the Vatican announced on Wednesday.

Chilean Cardinal Francisco Javier Errazuriz and Australian Cardinal George Pell were both removed from the so-called C9 Council of Cardinals, a powerful council of advisers picked by Pope Francis to guide him on matters critical to the future of the Catholic Church.

The last time the C9 met in September, Errazuriz, who is accused of covering up abuse in Chile, and Pell, who faces charges in Australia related to historical child sexual offenses, were both absent, and the council said it was considering restructuring.

In October, the pope wrote to the cardinals that they will leave the office to thank them for “the work they have achieved for five years,” Vatican press director Greg Burke said.

Despite being removed from the C9, Pell, 77, remains in charge of Vatican finances, the third most powerful position in the Roman Catholic Church.

Errazuriz, the retired archbishop of Santiago, met Francis last month and subsequently announced his “withdrawal” from the C9. “It’s not a resignation. I said goodbye at the end of the period for which I was appointed,” the prelate said in an interview with a Chilean newspaper. Back home, he is accused by victims of sexual abuse of having covered the acts of a pedophile priest, a case that scandalizes the South American country.

Late Jesuit priest with ties to Corpus Christi has 'credible allegations' of sexual abuse

CORPUS CHRISTI (TX)
Corpus Christi Caller Times

Dec. 12, 2018

By Alexandria Rodriguez

A Jesuit priest accused of more than one incident of sexual abuse of a minor spent time in Corpus Christi.

The late J. Donald Pearce, who was in Corpus Christi in the 1970s, was included in a list of names of Jesuits, who were members of the U.S. Central and Southern Province, with "credible allegations."

Jesuits are a Roman Catholic order of priests and brothers.

The men included in the list, released on the Society of Jesuits' website, fall into one of three categories.

Supporters of sex abuse survivor protest planned appeal by diocese

LONDON (CANADA)
London Free Press

December 12, 2018

ByJennifer Bieman

Supporters of clergy sexual abuse survivor Irene Deschenes shouted “shame” and “justice for Irene” at the Catholic diocese office in London Wednesday afternoon, delivering a letter to the bishop demanding the organization abandon a planned appeal of a court ruling that allows her to reopen a settled civil case.

Representatives from London-area women’s groups gathered at the office to denounce the diocese’s move and voice their support for the 57-year-old sex-abuse survivor.

“Irene entered into a legal process because of the wrong that was done to her by the diocese,” said Michelle Schryer, executive director of the Chatham-Kent Sexual Assault Crisis Centre.

On Friday, the Roman Catholic Diocese of London announced its plan to appeal Superior Court Justice David Aston’s Nov. 27 decision to allow Deschenes to reopen the settlement reached in her 1996 lawsuit for abuse involving then-priest Charles Sylvestre.

Memo to Henneberger: The logical thing is to 'hang in there'

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter

December 13, 2018

by David Knight
'
Editor's note: Last week, Melinda Henneberger, a public Catholic and writer, described her decision to leave the church amid ongoing revelations of the clergy sex abuse scandal and coverup, and what she was hearing about it.

It was one of the most-read pieces on our website. Among the many responses was the one below from Fr. David Knight. Both are smart and thoughtful (and quite witty) explorations of the "To leave or stay?" question increasingly on the minds of Catholics disgusted with the scandal and the inability of church leaders to deal with it at a depth that begins to restore trust.

We've invited NCR members by separate email to continue the discussion, and we'll report on those opinions at a later date. If you're not a member and would like to become one and join the discussion, you can do so here. You'll get an email early next week with instructions on how to send us your thoughts on the issue.

Melinda, I read your article in NCR just when an intellectual friend was disagreeing with my proposition that more people left the church because of boring Masses than because of child abuse. She and her husband, both highly educated, deeply involved Catholics, had both felt inclined to leave the church because of the recurring scandals, although they never would.

My response was, "But you are intellectual people. You couldn't leave for a reason like that. It is totally illogical!"

You are obviously intellectual, too, but in your article I found no one telling you that you are illogical. So I want to ask how in the world a person with your education could possibly leave the church for such an unreasonable reason. In the kind of people who vote for Donald Trump, it is understandable. Not in you.

Logically, if you leave the church because the priests are sinful and the bishops worse, you are saying you belonged to the church because the priests were holy and the bishops even more so — which would be manifestly insane. (Or it would be clericalism, which is the same thing!)

Cardinal Pell found guilty of sex abuse by Melbourne court

DENVER (CO)
Crux

December 13, 2018

By Christopher White

In a decision that will undoubtedly create shockwaves around the globe, Cardinal George Pell, the most senior Church official to stand trial for sexual abuse, was found guilty on Tuesday by a Melbourne Court.

In one of the most closely watched trials in modern Catholic Church history, after nearly four full days of deliberations, a jury rendered unanimous guilty verdicts on five charges related to the abuse of two choirboys in 1996.

The trial, which began on November 7, has been subject to a media blackout at the request of the prosecution, and follows a first trial in September ended after a jury failed to reach consensus.

December 12, 2018

‘It happened everywhere': How Pa. upended deep history of priest abuse across the nation

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

December 12, 2018

By Mike Argento

The grand jury implored everyone to take heed of all they had learned. Here's how their report shook up the world.

Marcia Hince lived with it all her life.

It’s difficult to explain. It was like a malignant growth, something that resided inside her being, infecting her soul, hoping against hope that ignoring it or suppressing her thoughts about it would make it disappear.

She felt alone, isolated, cut off from the rest of humanity, as if she were an alien being occupying a human body.

“I felt like I was the only person this happened to,” she said, “that I was outside the human race.”

She remained silent about it for years.

Then, in 2002, after the Boston Globe’s groundbreaking expose of child sexual abuse perpetrated by members of the Catholic clergy, she reported what happened to her to the Harrisburg diocese, writing a letter that outlined the abuse she endured and the consequences on her life.

Reports of Pell guilty verdict emerge, despite gag order

SYDNEY (AUSTRALIA)
Catholic News Agency

December 12, 2018

By Ed Condon

Cardinal George Pell has been convicted by an Australian court on charges of sexual abuse of minors, according to media reports and CNA sources close to the cardinal.

A judicial gag order has restricted Australian media coverage of the trial since June.

Despite the gag order, a story published Dec. 11 on the Daily Beast website first reported that a unanimous verdict of guilty had been returned by a jury on charges that Pell sexually abused two altar servers in the late 1990s, while he was Archbishop of Melbourne.

The verdict reportedly followed three days of deliberations by the jury - the second to hear the case. An earlier hearing of the case is reported to have ended in early autumn with a mistrial, after jurors were unable to reach a verdict.

In October, two sources close to Cardinal Pell, members of neither his legal team nor the Catholic hierarchy in Australia, told CNA that the first hearing of the case had ended in a mistrial due to a jury stalemate. One source said that jury was deadlocked 10-2 in favor of Pell.

In remarks to CNA Dec. 12, the same sources independently confirmed this week's report that a guilty verdict had been reached.

The conviction has not yet been confirmed by the Australian judiciary, and the gag order on Australian media could remain in place for several months.

Cardinal Pell, top advisor to Pope Francis, found guilty of ‘historical sexual offenses’

AUSTRALIA
America Magazine

December 12, 2018

By Gerard O’Connell

An Australian jury has found Cardinal George Pell, 77, guilty on five charges of “historical child sexual offenses” that go back decades, according to various media reports and confirmed by America. The 12-member jury gave their unanimous verdict in the County Court of the State of Victoria in Melbourne on Tuesday, Dec. 11.

The judge decided that the sentencing will take place in early February 2019 and released the cardinal on bail.

Little is known about the nature of the charges on which Cardinal Pell has been condemned because the entire trial and a second trial that has yet to take place are covered by a strict suppression order issued by the presiding judge, Peter Kidd. The order prohibits reporting on the case in any of the country’s media until the second trial has taken place to avoid prejudicing his case in both instances. The judge has prohibited the publication of the number of complainants in either of the two trials as well as the number and nature of the charges, except for the fact that the charges relate to “historical child sexual offenses.”

Lawsuit accuses Boy Scouts of negligence in New Mexico abuse case

ALBUQUERQUE (NM)
The Associated Press

December 12, 2018

A 44-year-old man has filed a lawsuit against the Boy Scouts of America, saying two Catholic priests who served as scout leaders in New Mexico sexually abused him for years starting in the early 1980s.

The lawsuit filed Thursday accuses the organization of negligence — with the victim saying officials knew or had reason to know the priests had abused boys.

The victim, who remains unnamed in the court filing, said he was abused during hiking and camping trips in the state, including at Cochití Lake and Jemez.

The priests accused of abuse in the lawsuit are Ronald Bruckner and Robert Malloy, neither of whom are listed as defendants.

Chris Shelby, the director of the Boy Scouts branch in New Mexico, did not immediately return an Associated Press call requesting comment.

He told KOB-TV on Monday that the organization — which like the Catholic Church has been at the center of sexual abuse scandals in the past — has implemented numerous policies since the 1980s to improve protections for youth.

Lawsuit Accuses Former Vermont Priest Of Sexual Abuse

BURLINGTON (VT)
The Associated Press/WAMC

December 12, 2018

By Pat Bradley

A Texas man who says he was sexually abused as a boy by a Vermont priest is suing the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington.

The complaint filed Friday alleges negligence, fraud and "outrageous conduct" by the diocese and seeks more than $75,000 in damages.

The Burlington Free Press reports the man says he was altar boy at St. Ann's Parish in Milton in the late 1970s and 1980s when he was abused by Father Alfred Willis.
Willis was accused of abusing others in several complaints that were settled in the early 2000s. He was eventually dismissed from the priesthood.

Bishop Christopher Coyne wrote in a statement the filing is "further evidence that we still have much to do to bring healing and closure" to survivors of sexual abuse by clergy in the past.

Victims call for Bishop Matano to release sex abuse files

ROCHESTER (NY)
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

December 11, 2018

By Sean Lahman

Days after Bishop Salvatore Matano dismissed two priests over allegations of misconduct, victims of sexual abuse by Catholic priests say the actions fall short of what is needed to address a dark chapter in the history of the Diocese.

"The removal of these two priests is just the tip of the iceberg," said Robert M. Hoatson, a former priest and co-founder and president of Road to Recovery Inc., a nonprofit charity based in New Jersey that assists victims of sexual abuse and their families.

On Sunday, the Diocese of Rochester announced that Matano had removed two priests after an investigation into allegations of misconduct.

Fathers Thomas J. Valenti and Erick Viloria are both restricted from engaging in public ministry or presenting themselves publicly as clerics, according to a statement from the Diocese of Rochester.

Abuse Survivor's $4M Judgment Against Jehovah's Witness Umbrella Organization Upheld by Court

CALIFORNIA
The Recorder

December 10, 2018

By Ross Todd

The ruling from the Fourth District Court of Appeal leaves in place terminating sanctions issued after the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York Inc. refused to hand over a trove of documents concerning known molesters in the church.

A California appellate court has upheld a $4-plus million judgment against Watchtower Bible and Tract Society of New York Inc., the top organizational body of Jehovah’s Witnesses, in a case brought by a woman who alleges she was molested as a child by a church elder in 2006.

The ruling from the Fourth District Court of Appeal leaves in place terminating sanctions and a $4,016,152.39 judgment after Watchtower refused to hand over a trove of documents it received in response to a 1997 letter sent to Jehovah’s Witness congregations concerning known molesters in the church.

The underlying case was brought on behalf of J.W., who was molested by Gilbert Simental, with whom she and her family attended the Mountain View Jehovah’s Witness congregation. J.W. contends that her family wouldn’t have allowed her to attend a slumber party at Simental’s house but for his service as an elder in the church, the highest authority at the congregational level of the organization. Simental was found guilty in two criminal cases of molesting J.W. and two other anonymous victims.

Churches must take action to end abuse

FORT WORTH (TX)
The Star-Telegram Editorial Board

December 9, 2018

Revelations of shameless sexual harassment and abuse by powerful men in entertainment, politics and the Roman Catholic Church rocked the nation the past few years.

In truth, such abuse may be just as pronounced, pervasive and pernicious among a loose-knit network of independent fundamental Baptist churches and universities, an eight-month Star-Telegram investigation has found.

The newspaper uncovered over 400 allegations of sexual misconduct in nearly 200 of the churches and affiliated institutions across 40 states and stretching into Canada.

Yet there appears to be even less accountability among these churches than in other areas of society.

Deceased Pocatello priest on list of alleged sexual abusers

ST. LOUIS (MI)
The Associated Press

December 9, 2018

Two Roman Catholic Jesuit provinces that cover nearly half the U.S. released the names Friday of more than 150 priests and other ministry leaders who were found to have “credible allegations” of sexual abuse made against them dating to the 1950s.

One of the names on the list is Segundo Llorente, who served at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Pocatello from 1982 to 1984. He also served at St. Stanislaus Church in Lewiston from 1984 to 1989. He died in 1989, according to the Jesuit’s release. The claims were for 1962-1963, and the mid-1960s, for alleged sexual abuse of a minor.

The Jesuits say many claims were received after accused priests had died. So in those cases thorough investigations could not be undertaken. Deceased individuals are included in the list based on the fact that an accusation was reported.

Accused abusers continue to work in independent Baptist churches, report says

NASHVILLE (TN)
Nashville Tennessean

December 9, 2018

By Amelia Ferrell Knisely

Pastors in independent fundamental Baptist churches have for the first time admitted they shuffled suspected abusers among churches and universities rather than call law enforcement.

It's according to an eight-month investigation by the Fort Worth Star-Telegram that includes first-hand accounts from former church members.

The report reveals 186 church leaders in the denomination were accused or convicted of committing sexual crimes against children, and at least 45 of the alleged abusers continued in ministry — including in Tennessee — after accusations came to the attention of church authorities or law enforcement.

Bishop Blames The Victim, Claims ‘Immodest Dress’ Of Women Causes Sexual Assault

BROOKSVILLE (FL)
Patheos

December 11, 2018

By Michael Stone

Blaming the victim: Bishop Donald Sanborn claims that the immodest dress of modern women causes sexual assault.

In a recent blog post for In Veritate, Bishop Sanborn offers a critique of the “MeToo” movement by suggesting that women cause their own sexual assault by tempting men with their “immodest dress.”

In his blog post Sanborn makes it clear that victims are at least partially responsible for their own sexual assault, writing:

For some, Catholic church's victim program made priest abuse trauma even worse

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

December 10, 2018

By Brandie Kessler

The program that appeared to be designed to support them left some sexually abused Catholics feeling even worse.

Mary Handler remembers some of the details so vividly that it’s like it happened yesterday instead of decades ago.

She was 5-½ years old, sitting in the backseat of her family’s car.

Family cars in the 1950s were big -- and felt exceptionally so to a child. Handler remembers it was dark out, her mother was in the front seat holding a baby and her father was driving.

Handler was wearing a dress. It was summertime.

Next to her sat the priest her family was taking to the bus station.

Dos religiosos condenados a prisión por abusos, enviados a Perú y Bolivia

[Two priests sentenced to jail for child abuse were sent to Peru and Bolivia]

MADRID, SPAIN
El País

December 9, 2018

By Íñigo Domínguez

Dos de las escasas sentencias de los noventa, de un agustino recoleto y un jesuita, terminaron con el agresor en América Latina a los pocos meses

Un jesuita, Luis Tó González, y un agustino recoleto, José Luis Untoria Mahave, recibieron en los noventa dos de las escasas condenas de cárcel por abusos de menores en España en aquellos años, en 1992 y 1997, respectivamente, y los dos tuvieron idéntico destino: enviados de misiones a América Latina, al no ingresar en prisión por ser penas de dos años y no tener antecedentes. Luis Tó, profesor del colegio San Ignacio de Barcelona y condenado por abusar de una menor de ocho años, cuando él tenía 57, fue trasladado a Bolivia a los dos meses de la sentencia. José Luis Untoria, profesor en el colegio Santo Tomás de Villanueva de Salamanca, condenado por abusar de diez alumnos del internado, partió a Perú. Tras el eco mediático de sus condenas, casi nada se supo de destino posterior.

La cara siniestra del padre Juanjo

[The sinister face of Father Juanjo, investigated for abusing minors in Benin]

MADRID, SPAIN
El País

December 9, 2018

By Julio Núñez and Íñigo Domínguez

La Congregación para la Doctrina de la Fe investiga a un conocido misionero que asiste a niños que viven en la calle en Benín. Dos jóvenes le acusan de violación

El sacerdote Juan José Gómez es un hombre conocido e importante en Benín (África). Su trabajo como misionero sacando a niños pobres de entre 8 y 17 años de las calles de la capital de Porto Novo le ha llevado a salir en varios medios españoles (EL PAÍS, Onda Cero y eldiario.es, entre otros) e incluso en un documental sobre el tráfico de menores en África (No estoy en venta). Frente a esa apariencia, varias denuncias por abusos arrojan sombras sobre su labor solidaria. En 2013, voluntarios denunciaron a Gómez por agredir sexualmente a varios menores a los que daba cobijo con su programa Chicos de la calle. Patrick Yehouenou, de 20 años, es uno de esos jóvenes.

Abogado de O'Reilly asegura que la solicitud de expulsión del país es "discriminatoria"

[O'Reilly's lawyer says expelling him from Chile would be "discriminatory"]

SANTIAGO, CHILE
Emol

December 12, 2018

By Juan Peña

Cristian Muga dijo que un extranjero es "sancionado dos veces" a diferencia de un chileno condenado por el mismo delito. Además, explicó que el arraigo es una de las razones por la que el cura podría pedir quedarse en el país.

El abogado de John O'Reilly, Cristian Muga, calificó como "discriminatoria" la solicitud de expulsión que pesa sobre el sacerdote, quien cumplió su condena de cuatro años de libertad vigilada por abuso sexual contra una menor.

Juan Carlos Cruz por separación de Errázuriz en el Vaticano: “El Papa lo echó por mentirle y por encubridor”

[Juan Carlos Cruz on Errázuriz: "The Pope tossed him for lying and covering up"]

CHILE
La Tercera

December 12, 2018

By Angélica Baeza

Una de las víctimas de Fernando Karadima valoró la decisión del Papa Francisco, de separar del C9 al ex arzobispo de Santiago.

Juan Carlos Cruz, una de las víctimas del ex párroco de El Bosque Fernando Karadima, valoró la decisión comunicada hoy por el Vaticano, de separar del Consejo de Cardenales a Francisco Javier Errázuriz.

Errázuriz ante separación de Consejo de Cardenales: “Hace algunas pocas semanas recibí la carta del Papa en que me agradecía el trabajo”

[Errázuriz reacts to his separation from the Council of Cardinals: "A few weeks ago I received a letter from the Pope thanking me for my work"]

CHILE
La Tercera

December 12, 2018

By Sergio Rodríguez

El ex arzobispo de Santiago fue separado del C9, por parte del Sumo Pontífice, decisión anunciada hoy por el Vaticano.

El cardenal Francisco Javier Errázuriz reaccionó ante la decisión comunicada hoy por el Vaticano, de separarlo del Consejo de Cardenales. “Efectivamente hace algunas pocas semanas recibí la carta del Papa en que me agradecía el trabajo”, afirmó el ex arzobispo de Santiago a La Tercera. Errázuriz será citado a declarar en calidad de imputado por un eventual encubrimiento de los delitos sexuales que habría cometido el sacerdote Jorge Laplagne.

Papa Francisco deja fuera a Errázuriz de Consejo de Cardenales

[Pope Francis excludes Errázuriz from Council of Cardinals]

CHILE
La Tercera

December 12, 2018

By A. Jara and C. Reyes

La misma medida se aplicó también para los cardenales George Pell, de Australia, y Laurent Monsengwo, de la República Democrática del Congo.

El Vaticano confirmó este miércoles que el arzobispo chileno Francisco Javier Errázuriz -investigado como encubridor de los abusos cometidos por el sacerdote Fernando Karadima- fue apartado del Consejo de Cardenales del Papa Francisco, una instancia conocida como C9 que tiene por objetivo realizar una reforma administrativa a la Santa Sede.

U.S. Catholic Church marred by allegations of abuse, claims of cover-up

WASHINGTON D.C.
Catholic News Service

December 11, 2018

By Carol Zimmermann

2018 will no doubt be remembered as a dark time for the U.S. Catholic Church.

Catholics felt betrayed by church leaders accused of sexual misconduct and cover-up revealed this summer and this cloud still hung over the church at the year’s end.

(See a related video.)

In June, allegations were made against then-Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, retired archbishop of Washington, accused of sexually abusing a minor almost 50 years ago and having sexual contact with seminarians while he was a bishop in New Jersey.

Priest Accused of Sexual Abuse Arrested on New Allegations

WASHINGTON D.C.
Associated Press via U.S. News & World Report

December 12, 2018

A Catholic priest in Washington, D.C., charged with sexually abusing a child has been arrested on new abuse allegations.

News outlets report 46-year-old Urbano Vazquez surrendered to authorities Tuesday on charges including sexual assault of a minor. A police report and city U.S. Attorney's Office release say Vazquez is accused of sexually touching a 9-year-old and a woman.

Vazquez was charged last month with child sexual abuse. Three people accused him of abusing them as teenagers, but prosecutors say the statute of limitations expired on two of the reported assaults.

Why the media is unable to report on a case that has generated huge interest online

AUSTRALIA
Sydney Morning Herald

December 12, 2018

By Patrick O'Neil & Michael Bachelard

Why we are unable to report on a case that has generated huge interest online

A very high-profile figure was convicted on Tuesday of a serious crime, but we are unable to report their identity due to a suppression order.

The person, whose case has attracted significant media attention, was convicted on the second attempt, after the jury in an earlier trial was unable to reach a verdict. They will be remanded when they return to court in February for sentencing.

A suppression order issued by the Victorian County Court, which applies in all Australian states and territories, has prevented any publication of the details of the case including the person's name or the charges. It was imposed after the court accepted that knowledge of the person's identity in the first trial might prejudice a further trial being held in March.

December 11, 2018

Altoona-Johnstown fund for clergy abuse survivors running dry after paying out $21.5 million

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Tribune Review

December 11, 2018

By Deb Erdley

As the Pittsburgh Diocese prepares to unveil details of a fund for adult survivors of clergy child sexual abuse, the Altoona-Johnstown Diocese this week revealed it has paid $21.5 million related to such costs over the last 19 years.

In a special message to parishioners dated Monday, Altoona-Johnstown Bishop Mark Bartchak said the church there sold its diocesan center in 2016 and bishop’s residence in 2014 and used those proceeds as well as insurance funds and financial reserves to pay $15.7 million to survivors, $514,422 in counseling and support services, $4.3 million in legal costs and just under $907,389 in support of priests accused of child sexual abuse.

The diocese with a Catholic population of about 84,000 — the smallest in the state— was the subject of a 2016 state grand jury investigation. It concluded about 50 predator priests prowled its small town and rural parishes and schools over decades, often transferred from place to place by their bishops as allegations of sexual abuse surfaced.

Diocese of Rochester removes two priests from public ministry

ROCHESTER (NY)
WHAM

December 10, 2018

By Antoinette DelBel

The Diocese of Rochester has removed two priests from public ministry following an independent investigation into allegations of misconduct.

Reverend Thomas Valenti and Reverend Erick Viloria are restricted from presenting themselves publicly as clerics.

Father Valenti, who served at Blessed Trinity/St. Patrick’s in Tioga County, was accused in June 2018 of sexually abusing a minor. The alleged abuse occurred in the 1970s.

In June, Boston attorney Mitch Garabedian publicly accused Father Thomas Valenti of that sexual abuse incident when he worked as a deacon at St. Mary’s of the Lake Church in the Town of Ontario in the ‘70s.

Julia Gillard's work for abuse survivors recognised

AUSTRALIA
SBS News

December 10, 2018

Former Prime Minister Julia Gillard has received this year's annual Blue Knot Award.

Former prime minister Julia Gillard has received an award for her role in establishing the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

On Monday, the Blue Knot Foundation – National Centre of Excellence for Complex Trauma gave Ms Gillard its annual Blue Knot Award in recognition of her "foresight, determination and courage".

The organisation, which works with survivors of childhood trauma, presents the award each year to "leaders whose work and efforts inspire communities to unite in support of survivors".

"The commission was not only a beacon of light and truth but it has been the harbinger of real change," president Dr Cathy Kezelman said.

Trump calls hush money payments a 'simple private transaction'

WASHINGTON (DC)
Reuters

December 10, 2018

Donald Trump on Monday defended hush money payments reported by his former lawyer, responding a day after Democratic lawmakers said the U.S. president could face impeachment and jail time if the transactions are proven to violate campaign finance laws.

Trump said on Twitter that Democrats were wrongly targeting "a simple private transaction." Court filings last week drew renewed attention to six-figure payments made during the 2016 presidential campaign by Trump's personal lawyer to two women so they would not discuss their alleged affairs with the candidate.

U.S. Representative Jerrold Nadler, who will lead the Judiciary Committee when Democrats take control of the House of Representatives next month, said on Sunday that if the payments were found to violate campaign finance laws it would be an impeachable offense.

His Democratic counterpart on the Intelligence Committee, Representative Adam Schiff, said Trump could be indicted once he leaves office and could "face the real prospect of jail time."

L.A. Archdiocese reveals list of 54 clergy accused of abusing children

LOS ANGELES (CA)
The Los Angeles Times

December 6, 2018

By Laura Newberry

For the first time in a decade, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles on Thursday updated its list of clergy accused of molesting children, addressing renewed outcry about how the Catholic Church responds to abuse allegations.

“We owe it to the victim-survivors to be fully transparent in listing the names of those who perpetrate this abuse,” Archbishop Jose H. Gomez said in a statement in releasing the list of 54 names.

For nearly two decades, the archdiocese has been roiled by allegations that onetime church leaders mishandled priest abuse cases, sometimes moving clergy suspected of wrongdoing to other parishes rather than punishing them and informing law enforcement. The L.A. Archdiocese paid a record $740 million in various settlements to victims and had vowed to better protect its church members. Gomez succeeded longtime Cardinal Roger Mahony, who faced strong criticism for his handling of the scandal.

Advocates for abuse victims said the action was largely symbolic and that there was much more the church could be doing to better protect children and help victims. They also noted that the California Catholic Conference spent more than $86,000 to fight a bill — vetoed by Gov. Jerry Brown in October — that would have given survivors of childhood sexual assault more time to sue those who failed to stop their abuse.

Former New Orleans deacon George Brignac accused of sexually abusing another boy

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Advocate

December 11, 2018

By Ramon Antonio Vargas

A volunteer firefighter from North Carolina alleged in a lawsuit filed Tuesday that he was sexually abused numerous times as a seventh-grader in New Orleans by George Brignac, a former Catholic Church deacon and suspected serial child molester.

Echoing other cases against the disgraced clergyman, Morris Daniels’ suit also contends that he is owed damages because local Catholic officials failed to protect him from Brignac, who was assigned to the plaintiff’s school after being tried — though acquitted — on charges that he abused a child while teaching elsewhere.

The lawsuit comes amid a new focus on decades-old clerical abuse alleged to have occurred in New Orleans and a push by victims to bring the allegations out into the open. It follows the release last month by New Orleans Archbishop Gregory Aymond of a list of 57 credibly-accused clergy — which named Brignac — and the local Jesuit order's release last week of a similar list.

In the past, victims have often preferred to follow a private mediation process to settle sex abuse claims involving the church, including a number of others who have accused Brignac.

But Daniels is among a growing group of plaintiffs in New Orleans and elsewhere who have taken such claims to the courts in an effort to shed light on alleged abuse and the church's failure to stop it.

"They could’ve done something about it, but they didn’t," Daniels said in an interview. "They didn’t take care of us as kids. They just let it happen."

Blame lies, secrecy and unchecked power, not gay priests

SALT LAKE CITY (UT)
Salt Lake City Tribune

December 11, 2018

By Brandon R. Peterson

This past summer’s credible allegations against former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick have fundamentally altered the way Catholics are talking about the abuse crisis. In the wake of the Boston Globe’s 2002 exposé (memorialized in the important and painful film, Spotlight), the conversation revolved around the most shocking tales of abuse – namely, of priests sexually molesting children. And indeed, it’s the allegation that “Uncle Ted” sexually assaulted a minor that finally brought his story into its own recent spotlight.

However, the allegations against McCarrick also include repeated sexual transgressions with adult seminarians. While lacking the initial shock-value of child-molestation, this pattern of behavior has become a new focal point in conversations about the crisis. Part of this shift can be attributed to a religious extension of #MeToo, sometimes called #ChurchToo.

The #MeToo movement has drawn attention to the way that power dynamics contribute to sexual predation. Harvey Weinstein is perhaps the most famous case but, again and again, powerful figures in the workplace have used their influence to sexually prey upon their subordinates. A similar power dynamic can be seen in the seminary. In this setting, where vows of celibacy and chastity are ostensibly operative, powerful figures such as McCarrick have groomed future priests by offering enticing political-ecclesiastical connections – and have manipulated those offers to satisfy their own sexual appetites.

Hundreds of sex abuse allegations found in fundamental Baptist churches across U.S.

FORT WORTH (TX)
Star-Telegram

December 9, 2018

By Sarah Smith

Joy Evans Ryder was 15 years old when she says her church youth director pinned her to his office floor and raped her.

“It’s OK. It’s OK,” he told her. “You don’t have to be afraid of anything.”

He straddled her with his knees, and she looked off into the corner, crying and thinking, “This isn’t how my mom said it was supposed to be.”

The youth director, Dave Hyles, was the son of the charismatic pastor of First Baptist Church of Hammond, Indiana, considered at the time the flagship for thousands of loosely affiliated independent fundamental Baptist churches and universities.

Re-opened sex abuse case against Catholic church 'continuation of my fight': survivor

LONDON (ONTARIO, CANADA)
The London Free Press

December 7, 2018

By Jane Sims

When she accepted a civil settlement from the Roman Catholic Church 18 years ago, Irene Deschenes was defeated.

“We are tired, we want closure and are hesitant to believe we can or will get justice from the court process,” she wrote in an email to her lawyer before accepting the terms in 2000.

What Deschenes, the Catholic Diocese of London and disgraced ex-priest Charles Sylvestre wouldn’t know is that settlement would send Deschenes on a determined course to expose the abusive Sylvestre and hold the church accountable.

In a ground-breaking decision, Superior Court Justice David Aston, who quoted Deschenes’ email, granted her motion and allowed the sexual abuse survivor to re-open her settlement after almost two decades.

“My goal here is to hold the Roman Catholic Church accountable for their unspeakable treatment of survivors,” Deschenes said at a news conference here on Thursday. “This is a continuation of my fight for justice, for me, and other known and unknown survivors of sexual abuse by priests and other religions.”

Syracuse Bishop Cunningham on clergy abuse: We had 'a slow awakening' to its severity

SYRACUSE (NY)
syracuse.com

December 3, 2018

By Julie McMahon

Syracuse Bishop Robert Cunningham's choice to release a list of abusive priests is part of a "slow awakening" to the seriousness of child sex abuse, he said in an interview today.

The Catholic Diocese of Syracuse today released a list of 57 priests with credible allegations of child sex abuse against them.

See Syracuse priests with credible allegations of child sex abuse

SYRACUSE (NY)
syracuse.com

December 3, 2018

By Julie McMahon and Mark Weiner

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse today for the first time released a list of 57 priests with "credible" allegations of child sexual abuse against them.

According to the diocese, 38 of the priests are deceased. The diocese said all living priests named to the list have been removed from ministry and there are no active priests with credible claims against them in the Syracuse diocese.

Claims against at least 16 of the priests named Monday were reported previously.

What follows is information about each priest made public by the diocese and from previous reports in The Post-Standard's archives.

Cincinnati priest accused of abusing altar boys in the Philippines

CINCINNATI (OH)
WLWT & AP

December 6, 2018

By John London

A priest from Cincinnati is under arrest in the Philippines, accused of molesting minors.

Authorities are trying to determine if he might have sexually abused anyone in his home area.

The Rev. Kenneth Bernard Hendricks, 77, was taken into custody two days ago and charged with abusingat least five and maybe as many as 10 boys, ranging in age from 7 to the teens.

According to U.S. Attorney Ben Glassman, Hendricks met the boys through his Catholic missionary work.

"He befriended them," explained Glassman, who described the behavior as horrifying. "He would invite them to his residence, often to take a bath or a shower. That interaction would then proceed to kissing, and then he would fondle their genitals, masturbate them or masturbate with them and ultimately have oral and anal sex with the victims."

Priest from Cincinnati accused of abusing 'multiple young boys' in the Philippines

CINCINNATI (OH)
Cincinnati Enquirer

December 6, 2018

By Dan Horn, Cameron Knight and Sarah Brookbank

The first boy went to police in early November, telling officers in his remote town in the Philippines a harrowing tale about the Catholic priest from Cincinnati he accused of sexually abusing him for years.

Then another boy told a similar story. And another. And another.

Within weeks, Filipino police and U.S. immigration officials had arrested the Rev. Kenneth Bernard Hendricks on charges of sexually assaulting five altar boys in his home and in his church.

El Obispado de Bilbao denuncia a un sacerdote por abusos sexuales

[Bilbao diocese denounces priest for sexual abuse]

BILBAO (SPAIN)
El País

December 10, 2018

By Pedro Goropse

La Iglesia abrió una investigación que ha detectado "comportamientos inadecuados contra la libertad sexual"

La fiscalía de Bizkaia investiga a un cura tras la declaración de tres mujeres que le han denunciado por "tocamientos". Se trata del presbítero responsable de la zona de Mungia, Bizkaia, Egoitz Arruza, técnico especialista en electrónica industrial que se ordenó el año 2005. Ha sido vicario parroquial en Derio, Zamudio, Lezama, Larrabetzu y Goikoelexea, y tanto el Obispado de Bilbao como los "scouts" le han apartado de sus responsabilidades. Los hechos denunciados se produjeron entre los años 2015, 2016 y 2017, cuando las mujeres pertenecían al movimiento de los scouts, del que el cura era responsable. Una de ellas era menor cuando sucedieron los hechos denunciados y le acusan de "comportamientos inadecuados contra la libertad sexual". La fiscal jefe de Bizkaia, Ana Barrilero Yarnoz, ha confirmado a Efe que el Obispado les comunicó los hechos y "se han abierto diligencias, las cuales se encuentran en fase de inicio de la investigación".

El Gobierno recuerda que la Iglesia debe denunciar los abusos

[Spain's government restates that the Church must denounce abuses]

MADRID (SPAIN)
El País

December 10, 2018

By Julio Núñez

En una respuesta parlamentaria a Unidos Podemos, el Ejecutivo rechaza pedir a los obispos datos sobre los casos silenciados

La Iglesia española estaba obligada por ley a comunicar a la justicia ordinaria los casos de abusos sexuales a menores que conoció y silenció en las últimas décadas, según afirmó el Gobierno en una respuesta parlamentaria al grupo de Unidos Podemos a finales de noviembre. El Ejecutivo contesta así a una pregunta sobre si considera que los acuerdos con el Vaticano son un obstáculo legal para que la Iglesia española colabore con los tribunales en los casos de pederastia. En su respuesta, a la que tuvo acceso ayer EL PAÍS, el Gobierno alega que la única posibilidad en la que los clérigos pueden acogerse a los Acuerdos de 1976 para no denunciar los casos que conozcan es si esos delitos se les han revelado “en el ejercicio de su ministerio [por el secreto de confesión]” y no al conocimiento que puedan tener “por otros medios”, en cuyo caso sí estarían obligados a denunciar.

[VIDEO] Maristas ofrecían dinero por silencio

[VIDEO: Marists offered money for silence]

CHILE
T13

December 10, 2018

El investigador canónico de los abusos sexuales en Colegios Maristas determinó la verosimilitud de la mayoría de los casos denunciados y propuso que varios religiosos sean expulsados. Dicha congregación negoció además el pago 50 millones de pesos a la familia de una víctima. Todo a cambio de no interponer ninguna acción en la justicia ni revelar lo sucedido a terceros

Dinero a cambio del silencio de las víctimas de abusos sexuales: la nueva denuncia contra los maristas

[Money in exchange for abuse victims' silence: new accusation against the Marists]

CHILE
El Mostrador

December 11, 2018

“Esta política de tapar con plata se viene dando y se ha dado mucho, es la costumbre que tenían", denunció Gonzalo Dezerega, ex alumno del Instituto Alonso de Ercilla y también víctima de abusos por parte de religiosos. De acuerdo a un documento, se ofreció 50 millones a la familia de una víctima a cambio de “renunciar a toda acción judicial o extrajudicial que tuvieran contra el Instituto, la parte sostenedora, o respecto de trabajadores de la Congregación”.

Dinero a cambio del silencio de las víctimas. Esta es una nueva acusación contra las prácticas de la Congregación de los Hermanos Maristas, uno de los grupos religiosos presentes en Chile que ha protagonizado bullados casos de abusos sexuales contra menores.

O’Reilly, el sacerdote condenado por abusar sexualmente de una niña: “No soy pedófilo”

[O'Reilly, the priest convicted of sexually abusing a girl says: "I'm not a pedophile"]

CHILE
El Mostrador

December 11, 2018

El influyente sacerdote de los Legionarios de Cristo vive horas clave, dado que un decreto de la Subsecretaría del Interior determinó su expulsión de Chile una vez cumplidos los 4 años de sentencia. Su abogado se aferra a una interpretación, mientras el representante de las víctimas sostiene que “no hay ninguna justificación para que se mantenga en el país".

“Una sola cosa, no soy pedófilo, por más que esté en el recuerdo”. Esa fue la breve declaración a Chilevisión de John O’Reilly, el sacerdote que cumplió condena bajo el régimen de libertad vigilada por el delito de abuso sexual contra una menor de edad del colegio Cumbres y ahora debe abandonar el país de acuerdo a un decreto de la Subsecretaría del Interior.

Abogado de O'Reilly dice que cura está "preocupado" y detalla opciones tras cumplimiento de condena

[O'Reilly's attorney says the priest is "worried" and evaluating options after serving his sentence]

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Emol

December 10, 2018

By J. Peña

Cristián Muga explicó que el plazo de 72 horas corre desde que se notifica el término de la condena que se cumple hoy, y que están evaluando las acciones a seguir.

"Muy preocupado por su situación". Con estas palabras el abogado del cura John O'Reilly, Cristián Muga, manifestó el estado en que se encuentra a horas de cumplir su condena a cuatro años de libertad vigilada por abuso sexual reiterado contra una menor, caso por el que fue condenado en 2014.

No 'church of nice' for Church Militant

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter

December 11, 2018

by Peter Feuerherd

At the door of the studios of Church Militant in this Detroit suburb, visitors face a picture of Michael the Archangel putting the sword to demonic hordes.

Previously a dispenser of catechetical videos, Church Militant has been transformed into a prime player in the Catholic culture wars by president and founder Michael Voris.

Voris, 57, rejects what he calls "the church of nice," a Catholic belief in deference to church hierarchy and a willingness to incorporate those who sometimes fall short of its teachings, particularly regarding sexual morality.

Claiming three million supporters, Church Militant, with a full-time staff of 34, sends out via the internet for $10 a month per premium subscriber a daily newscast, panel discussion, and various other commentaries, seeking a vision of the church in line with what Voris describes as Catholic "orthodoxy." A visitor who uses the labels conservative or traditional is quickly corrected.

Two papal flags fly over Church Militant offices located in a light industrial, non-descript set of two buildings. But the flags could be out of place. In some ways, Church Militant considers itself more Catholic than the pope, at least the current Bishop of Rome.

A stairway in the studio building holds a collection of photographs of the popes, dating through the last two centuries. Absent is Pope Francis, although his image adorns other office spaces.

The sex abuse scandal, which Church Militant in its daily newscasts and discussions says is largely a crisis of homosexual priests permitted to harass teenagers and young men, is proof that Francis is not up to his responsibilities.

Burlington Roman Catholic Diocese target of lawsuit accusing ex-priest of sexual abuse

BURLINGTON (VT)
Burlington Free Press

December 11, 2018

By Elizabeth Murray

A man who says he was sexually abused as a boy by a priest serving at St. Ann Catholic Church in Milton has filed a lawsuit against the Roman Catholic Diocese of Burlington alleging negligence, fraud, and "outrageous conduct."

The man is asking for in excess of $75,000 in damages, in addition to any other damages deemed appropriate by a jury.

The lawsuit alleges that the Diocese's actions in the man's case were "utterly reprehensible, egregious and patently outrageous," according to the legal complaint filed Friday.

The Diocese said it would respond to the Free Press's request for comment on Tuesday, but no response had been received as of 8:15 a.m.

The man was an altar boy and parishioner at St. Ann's Parish in Milton in the late 1970s and early 1980s, according to the complaint.

The man, who now lives in Texas, said he did not discover he had a personal legal action to bring against the Diocese until 2017. His complaint states that he has suffered "pain, emotional distress, embarrassment, humiliation, loss of self-esteem, post-traumatic stress disorder and other psychological injuries."

Lawsuit seeks names of Kansas City-St. Joseph priests accused of sexual abuse

KANSAS CITY (MO)
KMBZ TV

December 11, 2018

By Bill Grady

The plaintiff is listed as "John Doe" in official court documents, though his real name is Kevin Smith. The 54-year-old claims he was sexually abused by Father Thomas Reardon while he attended St. Gabriel's school at 4737 N. Cleveland Ave. in Kansas City.

Smith said he was 13 at the time of the abuse. The Catholic parish that includes St. Gabriel is also named in the lawsuit.

"I believe, in my opinion, he's a threat," said Smith, who would like to see Reardon go to prison for the rest of his life.

Smith's lawsuit seeks the release of names of those who have been investigated or reassigned because of sexual abuse allegations.

A large-scale independent investigation, like the one that recently took place in Pennsylvania, would be the best course of action, said Rebecca Randles, Smith's attorney.

Reardon, who was ordained in 1967, was accused in previous court filings of serving alcohol to teenage boys, allowing them privileges, including driving their cars, and taking part in sexual activity around them.

Prosecute Mobile abusers, for God’s sake

MOBILE (AL)
AL.com

December 10, 2018

By John Archibald

Forgive me Father, for I have sinned.

Sometimes that’s just not enough. Sometimes it’s not complete. Sometimes it’s too little too late, too half-hearted, too forced and weak and watery.

Like tears of a condemned man.

Like the Catholic Archdiocese of Mobile, with its late and lame revelations that dozens of priests and other clergy abused and molested and scarred children for decades in churches and schools across south Alabama. It had the ring of a deathbed confessional.

The Archdiocese last week released 29 names of Catholic priests, deacons and brothers accused of sexually abusing children since 1950. Most of them are dead or dying.

Forgive me Father, for I have sinned, and lied about it, and covered it up while the guilty grew old in their own beds while victims grew up in torment and anger and a guilt they did not earn.

An innocent bishop acquitted. Did anyone notice?

NORTH STRATHFIELD (AUSTRALIA)
Mercator.net

December 11, 2018

By Michael Cook

On May 22 the Catholic Archbishop of Adelaide, Philip Wilson, was found guilty of failing to report allegations of child sexual abuse. He was the most senior Catholic cleric found guilty of concealing abuse and the news was reported around the world.

On July 3, Archbishop Wilson was sentenced to 12 months' detention, with parole after six months. This eventually became home detention, which he began serving on August 14. This, too, was reported around the world.

Following the conviction in Newcastle Local Court before Magistrate Robert Stone, there were calls for the Archbishop to resign. Even then-Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, a Catholic, stuck his oar in. "The time has come for the Pope to sack him," he said. "There are many leaders that have called on him to resign, it is clear that he should resign."

Powerful stuff from powerful people. Although Wilson wanted to stay on officially as Archbishop until his appeal had been heard, he yielded to the pressure and resigned. Pope Francis accepted it on July 30. The historic resignation was reported as far afield as the New York Times.

And then ... acquittal

Pope Should Ban Priesthood, Not Homosexuals

LOS ANGELES (CA)
City Watch

December 10, 2018

By George Cassidy Payne

Theologically I am in total agreement with him that the Christian New Testament speaks of a preferential option for the poor, a radical call to abolish violence, and a moral duty to protect children. From the moment he assumed the pontificate, Francis has appeared to be a shining example of humility, hospitality, and hope.

So, it is with consternation that I listened to his latest comments regarding homosexuality in the clergy. During an interview given to the Italian daily Corriere della Sera, the Pope said it is a “serious matter” that “worries” him. Francis described homosexuality as "fashionable", and urged clergy to observe their vow of celibacy, going on to say that the Church had to be "demanding" in choosing candidates for the priesthood. And those responsible for training priests must make sure candidates are "humanly and emotionally mature" before they are ordained. "For this reason, the Church urges that persons with this rooted tendency not be accepted into ministry or consecrated life."

Heavy words from the leader of 1.2 billion followers worldwide.

Assuming that part of the Pope’s rational for holding these beliefs is his concern over the child abuse scandal afflicting the Church, it is necessary to analyze his comments further. As reported by the Southern Poverty Law Center, “According to the American Psychological Association, children are not more likely to be molested by LGBT parents or their LGBT friends or acquaintances.

Gregory Herek, a professor at the University of California, Davis, who is one of the nation's leading researchers on prejudice against sexual minorities, reviewed a series of studies and found no evidence that gay men molest children at higher rates than heterosexual men … Anti-gay activists who make that claim allege that all men who molest male children should be seen as homosexual. But research by A. Nicholas Groth, a pioneer in the field of sexual abuse of children, shows that is not so.

Two accused priests with ties to St. Stephens served in leadership at Missouri, Wyoming schools

POCATELLO (ID)
KPVI TV

December 11, 2018

By Seth Klamann

The two Jesuit priests who served at St. Stephens Mission and were included on a list last week of Jesuit clergymen who faced credible sexual abuse allegations served in leadership positions at Wyoming and Missouri schools.

The two now-former priests, Paul C. Pilgram and Anthony J. Short, were part of a 42-man list released by the Jesuit U.S. Central and Southern Province on Friday. Both men served at St. Stephens in the 1970s. Another list of credibly accused Jesuits will be released by the Midwest Province, which includes Wyoming, early next week.

Pilgram’s first posting was at St. Stephens, where he served roughly two years. He would next work at St. Louis University High School “during the timeframe of (his) alleged abuse,” according to a statement from the school’s current president.

Two Jesuit priests who served on Wind River Reservation named in report of clergymen accused of sexual abuse

Hundreds of sexual abuse cases reported at children's camps across U.S.

NEW YORK (NY)
CBS News

December 10, 2018

CBS News has identified hundreds of reports of sexual abuse that occurred at children's camps across the United States. We found reports of more than 500 victims who were allegedly sexually abused at children's camps over the past 55 years. At least 21 of those cases surfaced this year alone.

Victims' advocates tell us the real number of abuse cases is likely much higher, since many are never reported.

"After you took a shower, you'd put on your towel, and he didn't want you to wear underwear under it," the Texas boy said in a video, telling a psychologist what a camp counselor did to him in 2009. It allegedly happened over the course of 12 days at an overnight summer camp named Camp La Junta.

"He would check all the kids, but under their towel," he said. "He wouldn't look under there. He'd just stick his hand up."

When he returned home, the boy's mother says she knew something was wrong. "He was a different kid," said the woman, identified as Jane Doe. "He was not the happy-go-lucky little boy that loved to play outside. He was totally different. He just wanted to lay on the couch."

It wasn't until 10 months later that her son revealed a 20-year-old camp counselor named Matthew Bovee had allegedly molested him.

Duncan asked, "And what was your initial reaction?"

"I wanted to throw up," Jane replied. "I was nauseous. And all I could think of is to tell him I love him."

Toxic abuse and corruption must be rooted out

HUNTINGTON (WV)
Herald Dispatch

December 11, 2018

By John Patrick Grace

Tomatoes, asparagus, peaches and other vegetables and fruits left in the refrigerator too long will start to spoil. Eating partially corrupted food may sicken, even poison, the human body. Too little attention was being paid to items that had turned rotten. We were too trusting — and never verified.

Take the above as a metaphor for what has been happening in government and in many societal institutions, including the church.

Our processes for vetting those who might rise to positions of authority in colleges and public schools, including coaches and trainers, or in churches, such as priests, pastors and lay leaders, have clearly been inadequate.

The same seems to have been true for holding such individuals accountable for their actions, whether those actions constitute physical, sexual, emotional or financial abuse — or all four together.

Where should blame be assigned? And how can we reform our vetting, monitoring, reporting and disciplinary structures to keep the innocent — especially minors — safe from the threat of abuse?

The question applies equally well to the political sphere of elected and appointed officials as to the ecclesiastical sphere of ordained deacons, priests, pastors and bishops. Extend it even further into the realms of education (at all levels, from universities right down to pre-school), to police forces, the military and corporate America.

Religious sister accusing bishop of rape: ‘No nun should have to go through this’

MUMBAI (INDIA)
Crux

December 11, 2018

By Nirmala Carvalho

A nun in India accusing a bishop of raping her says she wants “the Church to recognise that I was wronged.”

The nun - whose name has been withheld - accused Bishop Franco Mulakkal of raping her 13 times between 2014 and 2016 at her order’s convent in Kuravilangad, in the southern state of Kerala - the heartland of Christianity in India.

She went to the police on June 29 with her accusations and submitted a 72-page statement.

Mulakkal vehemently denies the charges, and claims the nun is retaliating because he initiated an investigation against her for an affair she allegedly had with a married man.

The bishop was arrested on Sept. 21 after a months-long investigation and was released on bail Oct. 15.

St. Landry priest formally charged with molestation of a juvenile

Lafayette (LA)
The Acadiana Advocate

December 10, 2018

A St. Landry priest accused of sexually assaulting a teenager has now been formally charged, court records show.

Michael Guidry, who most recently was pastor of St. Peter’s Church in Morrow, was arrested in June after a deacon’s son came forward to allege the priest had given him alcohol and molested him.

A bill of information was filed last week, formally charging Guidry with molestation of a juvenile, court records show.

Priest Accused of 'Inappropriate Contact' With Minor, Adults

WASHINGTON (DC)
By Associated Press

December 11, 2018

A Catholic priest in Purcellville is accused of inappropriate contact with a minor and adults, the Loudoun County Sheriff's Office says.

The Catholic Diocese of Arlington has placed Father Ronald S. Escalante on leave pending an investigation by the sheriff's office. The Saint Francis de Sales Church pastor is accused of "boundary violations involving a minor and adults'' that go against its clergy code of conduct, according to a press release from the diocese.

Sheriff's spokesman Kraig Troxell says the diocese reported the possible "inappropriate contact'' to authorities.

Accountability group says 19 clergy members accused of sex abuse were not on recently released list

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
WVUE Fox 8 TV

December 10, 2018

By Kimberly Curth

We’re learning new information about the recently released list of Jesuits credibly accused of child sex abuse. An accountability group says it’s incomplete.

Bishopaccountability.org says, “19 Jesuits already known to be accused of abuse” were left of the list released Friday by the Jesuits U.S. Central and Southern Province.

That includes Daniel Ramsey Barfield, a teacher and counselor who was at Jesuit High School from 1969-1975.

Tim Lennon, the president of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, or SNAP, says that’s why there needs to be a statewide investigation into church sex abuse here in Louisiana.

“We call on the State Attorney General of Louisiana to, in fact, investigate. There’s sufficient cause to say that this institution is not policing itself, it shouldn’t have that responsibility, law enforcement should, and the Attorney General should take this issue seriously,” said Lennon.

The Jesuit Province released a list Friday of 42 clergy members credibly accused of child sex abuse. Eighteen of the men had connections to New Orleans Jesuit institutions.

Crisis in Catholic Church: One-on-one with Cardinal DiNardo

HOUSTON (TX)
WHRX TV

December 10, 2018

By Bill Balleza and Debbie Strauss

There is a crisis in the Catholic Church.

Earlier this month, federal, state and local law enforcement officials executed a search warrant inside the offices of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston.
ed out computers, files and boxes.

Just 24 hours earlier, in those same offices, KPRC2's Bill Balleza sat down with Cardinal Daniel DiNardo for an exclusive interview about the sex abuse scandal that perhaps foreshadowed the next day's events.

Balleza: "Has the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston been subpoenaed as part of this investigation?"

Cardinal DiNardo: "No, we have not. We are, of course, ready to cooperate with any investigation."

The law enforcement search came on the heels of the arrest of the Rev. Manuel La Rosa Lopez, who was accused of abusing children in Conroe in the 1990s and early 2000s.

December 10, 2018

Diocese of Gallup adds former St. Mary's priest to list of credibly accused

FARMINGTON (NM)
Farmington Daily Times

December 10, 2018
By Hannah Grover

A former Farmington-area priest has been added to the Diocese of Gallup’s list of priests the diocese states have been credibly accused of sexually abusing children.

Rev. Eugene Bowski, who served at St. Mary’s Parish in Farmington in the mid-1990s, was added to the list of credibly accused in late November, according to a press release from the diocese.

In a letter included with the press release, Bishop James Wall stated that the diocese has begun publishing the names of priests and church workers who have served in the Diocese of Gallup and have had credible allegations made against them for abuse that occurred outside of the Diocese of Gallup.

The press release states the Diocese of Gallup learned on Nov. 28 that Bowski had been added to the list of credibly accused for the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, West Virginia. While in West Virginia, he allegedly sexually abused a child in 1982.

Lawyer: Irish priest O'Reilly has finished Chile sentence

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Associated Press

December 10, 2018

By Eva Vergara

An Irish-born priest of the Legion of Christ religious order has finished serving a four-year sentence for sexually abusing a minor and may have to leave the country within days, his lawyer said Monday.

Attorney Cristian Murga said the prison system is expected to certify completion of the sentence "within days," which would trigger an earlier government decree giving the Rev. John O'Reilly 72 hours to leave Chile.

Murga left open, however, the possibility that O'Reilly could take some unspecified legal action before being expelled.

In 2014, O'Reilly was convicted of sexually abusing a minor while he was a chaplain at a prestigious school operated by the Legion in Santiago. The court also banned him from any job near children and ordered that his genetic data be added to a registry for abusers.

Victim of notorious priest speaks for first time

KANSAS CITY (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

December, 10 2018

SNAP wants all accused abusive clerics “outed”

But church officials in both KC MO & KC KS are refusing

Dozens of Catholic officials across the US are now posting such lists

Group also blasts KC MO prelate for letting disgraced Finn to come back

WHAT

Holdings signs at a sidewalk news conference, abuse victims and concerned Catholics will

--call on Catholic officials in both KS & MO to post names of accused priests on their websites, as dozens of US bishops have done recently, and

-- blast KC MO’s current bishop for letting his predecessor – who was convicted of failing to report suspected child abuse – back into the KC diocese recently for a church event.

A Nebraska man who was allegedly abused by one of Kansas City’s most prolific abusers, will also speak, using his name publicly for the first time ever.

Anonymous plaintiff in Kansas City Catholic sex abuse case reveals his name

KANSAS CITY (MO)
Kansas City Star

December 10, 2018

By Steve Vockrodt

A Nebraska man took to a sidewalk near the entrance of the Catholic Center in downtown Kansas City on Monday to identify himself as the previously anonymous plaintiff alleging sexual abuse by a former priest of the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph.

Kevin Smith, 54, who was accompanied by his lawyer, Rebecca Randles, said the Rev. Thomas Reardon sexually abused him when he was a teenager attending St. Gabriel’s Archangel Catholic Church in Kansas City, North.

Smith was identified as “John SK2 Doe” in a lawsuit filed against Reardon, the diocese and St. Gabriel’s in July.

“I am doing this because I know there are other victims out there that need help,” Smith told reporters. “I want the diocese to join me, to reach out to others that are suffering, to offer more than lip service, symbolic gestures and unfulfilled promises.”

Abuse scandal has cost Altoona-Johnstown diocese $21.5 million, bishop says

ALTOONA (PA)
Tribune Democrat

December 10, 2018

By Dave Sutor

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown has made what could be considered its most in-depth public statement concerning clerical child sexual abuse within its organization, since the Pennsylvania Office of Attorney General issued a grand jury report in 2016 outlining an alleged systemic effort to protect predator priests within its ranks.

A Dec. 10 edition of The Catholic Register, the diocese’s official publication, included multiple stories about the subject, a “special message” from Bishop Mark Bartchak and a chart showing that the expense of the scandal cost the diocese $21,491,052 from July 1, 1999, until Dec. 1, 2018.

The attorney general’s report provided information about how the diocese — then under the guidance of bishops Joseph Adamec and James Hogan — allegedly protected at least 50 religious leaders accused of abuse. Altoona-Johnstown has often declined to comment on subjects concerning clerical abuse, citing a policy of not discussing matters that could deal with ongoing litigation.

Abuse scandal has cost Altoona-Johnstown diocese $21.5 million, bishop says

ALTOONA (PA)
Tribune Democrat

December 10, 2018

By Dave Sutor

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown has made what could be considered its most in-depth public statement concerning clerical child sexual abuse within its organization, since the Pennsylvania Office of Attorney General issued a grand jury report in 2016 outlining an alleged systemic effort to protect predator priests within its ranks.

A Dec. 10 edition of The Catholic Register, the diocese’s official publication, included multiple stories about the subject, a “special message” from Bishop Mark Bartchak and a chart showing that the expense of the scandal cost the diocese $21,491,052 from July 1, 1999, until Dec. 1, 2018.

The attorney general’s report provided information about how the diocese — then under the guidance of bishops Joseph Adamec and James Hogan — allegedly protected at least 50 religious leaders accused of abuse. Altoona-Johnstown has often declined to comment on subjects concerning clerical abuse, citing a policy of not discussing matters that could deal with ongoing litigation.

Catholic priest charged with patronizing a prostitute in SLC to be reassigned

SALT LAKE CITY (UT)
Fox 13 News

December 10, 2018

By Taylor Hartman

A Catholic priest that was charged with patronizing a prostitute in Salt Lake City earlier this year will be replaced and reassigned, Catholic Church officials said.

Father Andrezej Pawlel Skrzypiec was arrested Aug. 24 near 200 North 900 West in Salt Lake City during an undercover prostitution sting where police were targeting “johns,” according to a probable cause affidavit filed in 3rd District Court.

Fr. Skrzypiec initially accused the undercover officer as being a “cop,” but eventually agreed to pay $30 for a sex act, the affidavit claimed. He was then arrested.

In a letter sent to the members of the Saint Ambrose Parish and School communities over the weekend, Most Rev. Oscar A. Solis, D.D., Bishop of Salt Lake City, stated that he recommended that Skrzypiec should be reassigned and that Skrzypiec accepted that recommendation.

Solis stated that a new pastor will be appointed for Saint Ambrose Parish and School.

“Over the past several months, many have suffered a great deal following the arrest of your beloved pastor, Father Andrezej Pawlel Skrzypiec for inappropriate behavior,” Solis wrote. “While Father Andrezej has insisted he was not guilty of a crime, his action caused serious scandal for the church.”

Louisville priest James Schook, who sexually abused altar boy, has died

LOUISVILLE (KY)
Louisville Courier Journal

December 10, 2018

By Chris Kenning

Former Louisville Roman Catholic priest James Schook, convicted of molesting a teen altar boy in the 1970s, died on Saturday at age 71, the Lousiville Archdiocese said Monday.

Schook was a central character for years in the local Catholic sex abuse crisis that exploded in 2002, which left some deeply critical of how the Louisville archdiocese handled abusive priests.

He was already suffering from end-stage melanoma, a terminal skin cancer, in 2014 when he was sentenced to 15 years in prison on three counts sodomy and one count indecent or immoral practice. He was released on medical parole last year.

More: Sex abuse survivors: Archbishop Kurtz isn't doing enough to protect his flock

The Archdiocese of Louisville released a statement on Monday extending sympathy to his family. "In praying for the repose of his soul, we also pray for continued healing for his victims and for all victim survivors of childhood sexual abuse," the statement said.

A Copy of the DOJ's Request to Preserve Documents

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

December 10, 2018

At SNAP, we believe that transparency is a critical element to ending the clergy sex abuse crisis, restoring public faith in religious institutions, and helping survivors heal. We are grateful when church officials take steps towards transparency, and even moreso when that transparency is forced by brave whistle-blowers. Today, we were lucky to have experienced the latter.

The below document is a copy of the federal Department of Justice's letter that was sent to Cardinal Daniel DiNardo and each of his brother bishops in early October, informing bishops that they must preserve any and all records related to clergy sex abuse including personnel files, "secret archives," and more. This copy was sent to us by an anonymous whistleblower.

Catholic priest who knew Hampden murder victim takes leave of absence

BANGOR (ME)
Daily News

December 10, 2018

By Judy Harrison

The Catholic priest who was a spiritual adviser to a Hampden woman allegedly killed by her brother-in-law is taking a leave of absence for “personal reasons,” the Roman Catholic Diocese of Portland announced Monday.

The Rev. Anthony Cipolle of Bangor advised Renee Henneberry Clark to keep a spiritual journal that came into the priest’s possession after she died. Superior Court Justice William Anderson ruled last week that he would review the diary to determine which portions of its contents could be admitted as evidence and which could not.

Cipolle’s attorney argued that the judge should not read the journal because it was covered by the religious privilege exemption.

In its announcement of Cipolle’s leave of absence, the diocese noted that it “does not involve a claim of sexual abuse of a minor.” The diocese said the leave of absence is effective immediately.

Two Rochester-area priests dismissed after investigation of misconduct

ROCHESTER (NY)
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle

December 10, 2018

By Sean Lahman

Bishop Salvatore Matano has removed two priests from public ministry after an investigation into allegations of misconduct.

Fathers Thomas J. Valenti and Erick Viloria are both restricted from engaging in public ministry or presenting themselves publicly as clerics, according to a statement from the Diocese of Rochester.

Valenti, who was serving as parochial administrator of Blessed Trinity/St. Patrick’s in Tioga County, was at Rochester's Blessed Sacrament from 1977-1979 and at St. Louis in Pittsford from 1984-1989.

Clergy Victims Press States To Open Window On Abuse Suits

UNITED STATES
Law360.com

December 9, 2018

By Daniel Siegal

George Koharchik had a reputation as his Johnstown, Pennsylvania, parish's "favorite priest" when Shaun Dougherty met him in 1980 at the age of 10, and the time they spent together started out innocently enough.

But Dougherty said those interactions with his religion teacher and peewee basketball coach were just grooming for fondling and other sexual abuse that continued until Dougherty was 13.

While Dougherty tried to put the nightmare behind him as an adult, he was left feeling helpless all over again after Koharchick was defrocked in 2012 and Dougherty came forward to be interviewed by prosecutors. It was then Dougherty discovered it was too late to pursue a criminal or civil case.

A Copy of the DOJ's Request to Preserve Documents

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

December 10, 2018

At SNAP, we believe that transparency is a critical element to ending the clergy sex abuse crisis, restoring public faith in religious institutions, and helping survivors heal. We are grateful when church officials take steps towards transparency, and even moreso when that transparency is forced by brave whistle-blowers. Today, we were lucky to have experienced the latter.

The below document is a copy of the federal Department of Justice's letter that was sent to Cardinal Daniel DiNardo and each of his brother bishops in early October, informing bishops that they must preserve any and all records related to clergy sex abuse including personnel files, "secret archives," and more. This copy was sent to us by an anonymous whistleblower.

Diocese to release list of clergy accused of abuse

CASPER (WY)
Casper Star-Tribune

December 10, 2018

By Seth Klamann

The Diocese of Cheyenne is compiling a list of priests, bishops and deacons who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse since 1950, Bishop Steven Biegler announced this week, signaling that the Wyoming diocese is joining a wave of public self-examinations by dioceses across the country.

“The Diocese should have a current master list so it can be confident that it has applied the current standards to all living credibly accused offenders — and especially the standards of zero tolerance — in all situations,” Biegler wrote in a column in the December issue of the Wyoming Catholic Register. He added the review will also examine how the six bishops who have served since 1950 — himself included — handled the allegations.

The diocese previously conducted a review in 2002 — the same year that former Bishop Joseph Hart was cleared of abuse allegations by the Natrona County District Attorney’s Office — of clergymen who were working in it at the time. That review “verified that no priest with a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor was serving in the public ministry in any way in the Diocese of Cheyenne,” Biegler wrote.

This latest examination comes as dioceses across the country conduct sweeping reviews of their own troubled histories with clerical sexual abuse. On Thursday, the church named 29 men accused of abuse in southern Alabama, allegations that dated back to 1950. In November, a diocese in Missouri named 33 priests and religious brothers who had been credibly accused. In August, a grand jury in Pennsylvania wrote that more than 300 Catholic priests had molested more than 1,000 children for decades.

The work on this latest review began after mid-September, when the Star-Tribune requested information regarding all credibly accused priests, all settlements and the amount paid in these agreements dating back to 1950, said Rev. Carl Gallinger, the diocese’s vicar general. He said the “commitment” to conducting the review predated the newspaper’s request. He said he had no time estimate on when the review, which will be conducted by an “independent law firm,” would be completed.

Biegler was unavailable to comment Thursday. It’s unclear how much detail will be in the list.

Ex-priest accused in Pa. grand jury report denies allegations, assails process

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

December 10, 2018

By Paula Reed Ward

By the time former priest Stephen Jeselnick learned in May that he had been named as an abuser in the Pennsylvania attorney general’s investigation into child sexual abuse in the Catholic Church, the two pages of the grand jury report accusing him were already completed.

He wasn't invited to testify, and though he challenged the accusations before the supervising judge of the grand jury when he learned of them, Mr. Jeselnick was told he and others named had no recourse except to submit a written response that would be appended to the final report.

The summary provided scant detail, alleging the abuse happened in the late 1970s at St. Brigid church in Meadville and that the victims’ mother worked there.

He did not know who was accusing him or why they had never come forward before 2017.

Exposé Reveals Network of Baptist Institutions That Shielded Child Molesters

NEW YORK (NY)
Patheos blog

December 10, 2018

By Terry Firma

“My earliest memory of being molested was when I was four years old. It was Sunday school.”

So begins the fourth and final installment of an extraordinary Fort Worth Star-Telegram investigation into child molestation in and around independent Baptist churches. Published yesterday after an eight-month investigation, the story by journalists Sarah Smith, Shelly Yang, and Neil Nakahodo reveals how a network of churches and schools covered up nationwide sexual abuse — and, in an all-too-familiar pattern, helped relocate the evildoers.

Here are a few gut-wrenching passages.

On religious impunity:

Even if criminal charges are brought against a church leader, he might be allowed to continue in ministry. Facing charges that he had sex with a 14-year-old, a pastor left his Indiana church for Miami, where he told his new congregation that the girl was “promiscuous.” Though he pleaded guilty to felony stalking in 2009, he didn’t leave the church until 2014. He maintains his innocence. He’s one of nearly four dozen men who were allowed to continue in their ministry after facing sexual abuse allegations — and even convictions, the Star-Telegram found.

Diocese of Rochester removes two priest during sex abuse investigation

ROCHESTER (NY)
WROC TV

December 10, 2018

By Howard Thompson

The Diocese of Rochester has removed two priests from the ministry as it looks into claims of sex abuse.

Reverend Thomas Valenti, who works at Blessed Trinity/St. Patrick’s in Tioga County, and Reverend Erick Viloria, who served at Our Lady of Peace Parish in Geneva have been removed.

The move comes as the church looks into new accusations of sexual abuse brought this past summer when Attorney Mitchell Garabedian accused eight Rochester priests of sexual misconduct.

This is a breaking news story and will be updated.

Abuse of Vulnerable People and Churches: Recent Reports

LITTLE ROCK (AR)
Bilgrimage blog

December 10, 2018

By William Lindsey

This is a collection of reports on the abuse situation as it is unfolding in various churches now. These are all recent statements, and not by any means a representative report on all that is happening on the sexual abuse front in religious groups right now. Stories are breaking on that front fast and furious — this is only my own selection of reports that have drawn my attention recently, for reasons that will be apparent as you read:

Sarah Smith, "Hundreds of sex abuse allegations found in fundamental Baptist churches across U.S.":

For decades, women and children have faced rampant sexual abuse while worshiping at independent fundamental Baptist churches around the country. The network of churches and schools has often covered up the crimes and helped relocate the offenders, an eight-month Star-Telegram investigation has found.
More than 200 people — current or former church members, across generations — shared their stories of rape, assault, humiliation and fear in churches where male leadership cannot be questioned. …
Twenty-one abuse allegations were uncovered exclusively by the Star-Telegram, and others were documented in criminal cases, lawsuits and news reports. But victims said the number of abused is far greater because few victims ever come forward.

Sarah Smith, "These 'men of God' sexually abused children. Then they found refuge at other churches":

Options Emerge for Handling the ‘Other Sexual-Abuse Crisis’

WASHINGTON (DC)
National Catholic Register

December 10, 2018
.
By Ed Condon

The recent sex-abuse scandals that have rocked the Church in the United States and beyond have mostly focused on the abuse of minors. At the same time, many recent revelations and allegations, as in the case of Archbishop Theodore McCarrick, have involved the sexual abuse or harassment of adults.

How the Church deals with clerical sexual misconduct when it does not involve minors remains a thorny issue, but an increasingly urgent one. Independent investigations are currently underway by local bishops to examine allegations of serious sexual misconduct in seminaries in Boston, Philadelphia and Newark.

In a recent interview, Pope Francis highlighted how a “fashionable” acceptance of homosexual relations had entered the Church. During the recent USCCB assembly in Baltimore, Bishop Joseph Strickland of Tyler, Texas, made the same point, offering it as the explanation for how McCarrick was serially promoted, despite his sexual behavior apparently being known to the hierarchy.

Also in Baltimore, Cardinal Seán O’Malley of Boston, who heads the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors, said that the bishops need to have a “fulsome discussion about adult misconduct and how to deal with that.”

Se la acabó el plazo: cura O’Reilly cumple su condena y tiene 72 horas para irse de Chile

[His sentence served, priest John O'Reilly has 72 hours to leave Chile]

CHILE
El Mostrador

December 10, 2018

El sacerdote favorito de la élite política y empresarial termina este lunes los 4 años que pasó en libertad vigilada por abusar de una menor de edad del exclusivo colegio Cumbres. Ahora, debe abandonar el país luego que la justicia desechara un recurso de protección presentado por su defensa para evitar su expulsión. En paralelo a su situación judicial, aún está pendiente la definición de su caso a nivel de la justicia eclesiástica, donde todo indica que correrá el mismo destino de otros curas abusadores expulsados del sacerdocio.

Este lunes, el sacerdote John O’Reilly cumple sus cuatro años de condena bajo el régimen de libertad vigilada por el delito de abuso sexual contra una menor de edad del colegio Cumbres.

Fieles agreden a administrador apostólico en celebración de la Inmaculada Concepción en Puerto Montt

[The faithful protest apostolic administrator after Immaculate Conception celebration in Puerto Montt]

CHILE
BioBioChile

December 9, 2018

By Ariela Muñoz and Carlos Arismendi

Adherentes a curas investigados piden la salida del administrador apostólico de Puerto Montt. El representante del Papa salió escoltado por Carabineros, tras la celebración de la Inmaculada Concepción. Los fieles acusan a Ricardo Morales de dividir a la iglesia en Puerto Montt, tras las denuncias que realizó en la Fiscalía contra de los sacerdotes Tulio Soto y Darío Nicolás, por apropiación indebida de dineros y tráfico de estupefacientes.

Ex-priest worked in Liverpool middle school for 25 years after teen reported sex abuse

SYRACUSE (NY)
Syracuse.com

December 10, 2018

By Chris Baker

A Catholic priest who resigned following allegations of sexual abuse was able to go on to a 25-year career as a guidance counselor at a Liverpool middle school. He resigned only after the district learned of the allegations in 2003 and threatened to fire him. He died shortly after.

Donald J. Crosby remained in a position to have daily interaction with children after a teen-aged girl reported instances of sexual abuse to his superior, Monsignor H. Charles Sewall, at a Catholic school in 1974.

The victim came forward again, decades later, amid a national reckoning for abusive priests. She was outraged to learn Crosby was no longer a priest but was instead working in a school.

A diocesan spokeswoman said last week the church had no record of the victim's first report, or any records of inappropriate behavior by Crosby. Sewall, it seems, never filed a report, and the school district didn't learn of the allegations until 2003.

Crosby was one of 57 priests with credible allegations of sexual abuse against them who were identified by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse last week. Sewall was also on the list. Both are now dead.

Piden que renuncie el administrador apostólico de Puerto Montt

[There is pressure on Puerto Montt's apostolic administrator to resign]

CHILE
Soy Chile

December 8, 2018

Al finalizar misa de celebración de la Inmaculada Concepción, fieles elevaron carteles y lanzaron gritos en su contra. Carabineros intervino para resguardar su seguridad.

Custodiado por efectivos de Carabineros y bajo gritos que pedían su renuncia, el administrador apostólico de Puerto Montt, Ricardo Morales, abandonó esta tarde el campo de oración, a los pies de la Casa Nazaret, donde tuvo lugar la tradicional celebración de la Fiesta de la Inmaculada Concepción.

Archbishop Scicluna and his recent appointment at the Vatican

MALTA
Malta Independent

December 10, 2018

By Simon Mercieca

A few days ago, I was invited to preside over the launch of a book by Antonio Ureta about Pope Francis. I shall be reviewing this book next week. What I wish to share is an interesting conversation that I had with one of those present during the coffee break. This gentleman is a person who follows thoroughly the church and attends even Catholic congresses abroad. What he told me was that not all the clergy, whom he met ata Congress in Rome were in tune with the positions that Archbishop Charles J. Scicluna has taken regarding the implementation of the encyclical Amoris Laetitia.

It is a fact that archbishop Scicluna was one of the first archbishops, if not the first, to have endorsed the encyclical Amoris Laetitia and put it into practice. I am here referring to stands taken by the Church in support of communion to divorced Catholics. I am not a theologian, therefore I will not be analyzing this fact from a theological point of view. But I am a historian and a commentator of current affairs. Hence, I shall be analyzing this from a political stance.

Norfolk priest on leave, accused of violating code of conduct

NORFOLK (VA)
WVEC

December 10, 2018

By Amanda Johncola

A well-known Norfolk priest was placed on leave after he was accused of violating a code of conduct.

Father Joseph Metzger, the pastor at Blessed Sacrament in Norfolk, was placed on leave after nonsexual misconduct accusations were made against him.

On Sunday, a letter from Most. Rev. Barry C. Knestout, Bishop of Richmond, was read to the parish community at Blessed Sacrament in Norfolk.

The letter stated that Father Metzger agreed to take a leave of absence as pastor from the parish due to complaints received by the Safe Environment Office concerning his interactions with young people.

Bishop Knestout made it clear that no allegations of child sexual abuse have been made, but the interactions complained of were not in keeping with the Code of Conduct with Minors in the Diocesan Safe Environment Regulations.

S.C. Catholics outline plan to release names of priests credibly accused of child sexual abuse

CHARLESTON (SC)
WLTX TV

December 9, 2018

By Mike Ellis

The Catholic church in South Carolina plans to release in early 2019 the names of priests credibly accused of sexually abusing minors since 1950.

The state's diocese, the Catholic Diocese of Charleston, said in a statement Friday evening that files are now being reviewed before the release.

Newer accusations, those made since a class action settlement was reached in 2007, are now being reviewed to be added to the list, according to the diocese.

The Public Pulse: Not safe even in church

OMAHA (NE)
World Herald

December 01, 2018

Regarding the article “Some churches address abuse allegations” (Dec. 3 Omaha World-Herald), it is crazy to think how even in a church, you cannot feel safe. It is literally the house of God, a place where you should feel welcome and, most importantly, feel at home.

Where has the world gone to? What sickens me is the fact that there are allegations made toward 34 priests and four deacons, and only a few of the accused have faced criminal charges or civil lawsuits. There are roughly 230,000 Catholics in Omaha. It has been more than three decades that the Catholic Church has been rocked by the sex abuse situation.

In Pennsylvania, within six Catholic dioceses more than 300 “predator priests” had been accused of sexually abusing more than 1,000 child victims. Is this situation not important enough to have more people charged with a crime, let alone the damage that has been done?

Omaha Archdiocese disclosure reveals clergy sex abuse secrets it hid for decades

OMAHA (NE)
World Herald

December 9, 2018

By Christopher Burbach

What the Omaha Archdiocese long sought to keep hidden, it is now shouting from the rooftops.

When it disclosed last month that 38 clergymen had been credibly accused of child sexual abuse or misconduct, some of the names were familiar — notorious priests who already had been defrocked or jailed.

But others — more than half — had been kept secret until last week, even though some of the reports of alleged abuse dated back decades.

And in an interview with The World-Herald last week, archdiocese officials said they had given to the state attorney general 100 additional names of church personnel who had faced claims of sexual misconduct or impropriety since 1978 — none of which they say were substantiated incidents involving minors. The church hadn’t disclosed that information in its release last month of the names of the 38 clergymen.

Among the 38, the allegations included some of the more popular priests in Omaha over the latter half of the 20th century, people who had been hiding in plain sight, such as:

The Rev. Robert Steinhausen and the Rev. Aloysius “Al” McMahon, whose names came to be enshrined on parish buildings.
The Rev. Richard Arkfeld, who used his struggle with lung cancer to inspire believers.
The Rev. Daniel Kenney, a Creighton Prep Jesuit with a monkey sock puppet who 50 years ago started the charity program Operation Others, in which Prep, Marian and other Catholic schools still participate.

New Birth’s new pastor promises church’s rebirth

ATLANTA (GA)
Journal Constitution

December 10, 2018

By Shelia M. Poole, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Jamal Bryant, the new senior pastor of New Birth Missionary Baptist Church, had a few words for doubters about the future of the DeKalb megachurch.

“New Birth has resilient people,” he said to a packed church in which nearly every seat on the lower level was filled.

“I feel almost like I need to take my shoes off, I’m standing on holy ground,” he said. “There are 100,00 angels circling this church.”

Bryant drew inspiration from Acts 28:1-6 for his message about recovering from difficulty.

After the death of Bishop Eddie L. Long and, later, the resignation of his successor, many people expected New Birth would die, but he said promised a “rebirth. … We are New Birth.”

What the Pennsylvania priests’ case reveals about the ‘right’ to reputation

LONDON (ENGLAND)
Spear's Magazine

December 10, 2018

To what extent do we have a right to reputation? And to what extent does that right fall away when an accusation is made of criminal conduct, asks reputation lawyer Jennifer Agate

In a recent decision, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court determined that the names of eleven priests accused of sexual abuse in a grand jury report should remain permanently redacted. A necessary measure, the court said, to 'protect their constitutional right to reputation'.

The allegations were of the utmost seriousness, the report described by the Pennsylvania Attorney General as the 'largest, most comprehensive report into child sexual abuse within the Catholic Church ever produced in the United States'. While the names of 270 priests had already been made public, eleven were redacted. Those priests argued that they had not had the chance to respond to the serious allegations made against them, citing examples of serious factual errors in the evidence presented to the Grand Jury which, they said, could be easily rebutted. The court agreed.

Pope fiddles as faith goes up in flames

TRENTON (NJ)
The Trentonian

December 9 , 2018

By Dave Neese

Not to tell the Holy Father how to do his job, but aren't there more troublesome issues facing the Church than, say, climate change and Trump's wall? Just asking.

Francis himself has said, "I like it when someone tells me 'I don't agree.' There is a true collaborator." Taking the Pontiff at his word then, let us dare to proceed.

Pope Francis has declaimed on various worldly topics, sometimes at great length. Meanwhile, the lawsuits and indictments stirring up a ruckus over clergy sexual abuse proliferate, even as the number of worshippers in the sanctuaries dwindles.

Declining attendance at worship applies to the Christian flock generally, including Protestants, and to Jews as well.

Only 39 percent of U.S. Catholics attend Mass weekly, according to the Pew Research Foundation's polling.

Only 33 percent of Protestants show up for their churches' weekly services. And a scant 19 percent of Jews can be found in the temple on a regular basis.

December 9, 2018

Abuse Victims Still Don’t Get Justice

NEW YORK (NY)
Verdict

December 10, 2018

By Leslie C. Griffin

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court recently decided to permanently redact the names of eleven priests from the Fortieth Grand Jury’s report on sexual misconduct by the clergy in six Pennsylvania Roman Catholic dioceses. The court ruled that the priests’ interest in their reputations was one of the “inherent rights of mankind” that the court needed to protect by taking the priests’ names out of the report. Redaction was the only path they thought they could find to protect the priests’ due process.

This conclusion was counter to the release of the complete report, which CHILD USA and BishopAccountability advocated in our amicus brief, which I wrote along with Marci Hamilton, Founder and CEO of CHILD USA. The court’s decision neglects the history of child abuse, which is a constant story of individuals who are terribly and repeatedly abused, and then never get justice.

The facts of child abuse are terrible and the stories about them constant. The Miami Herald recently told the story of more than 50 girls who were abused by rich Palm Beach businessman Jeffrey Epstein. Instead of having their interests protected, the girls were never told of Epstein’s “deal of a lifetime” with then-prosecutor and now Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta. The victims’ stories were kept quiet, and Epstein got a laughably short sentence. Epstein’s victims are still looking for justice.

Along with thousands of others. As many times as we read and re-read the statistics, they remain shocking. According to the American Society for the Positive Care of Children’s Sexual Abuse Statistics:

1 in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys will be sexually abused before they turn 18 years old.
Over 58,000 children were sexually abused last year.
8.3% of reported child abuse cases were sexual abuse.
34% of people who sexually abuse a child are family members.
12.3% of girls were age 10 or younger at the time of their first rape/victimization, and 30% of girls were between the ages of 11 and 17.
27.8% of boys were age 10 or younger at the time of their first rape/victimization.
96% of people who sexually abuse children are male, and 76.8% of people who sexually abuse children are adults.
325,000 children are at risk of becoming victims of commercial child sexual exploitation each year.
Caregiver alcohol or drug abuse is a child abuse risk factor putting kids at much higher risk for being abused.
The average age at which girls first become victims of prostitution is 12 to 14 years old, and the average age for boys is 11 to 13 years old.

Pedophilia victims deserve justice

PROVIDENCE (RI)
Providence Journal

December 9, 2018

By Mary Ann Sorrentino

In a quarter-page advertisement in this newspaper on Nov. 29, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Providence encouraged alleged priest pedophilia victims to come forward. Those ongoing scandals underscore widespread disgust for historically unpunished, unspeakable crimes against children. Adult survivors of rectory or home seductions — sometimes with parents nearby, unaware of the horrors their children suffered — deserve justice, and courts need laws to dispense it.

Warwick Attorney Carl DeLuca estimates about 450 victims sought his help: his office alone settled at least 65 civil cases against the Diocese of Providence.

With blackmail used to bury dark secrets, victims are warned of grave harm and told no one will believe them (as is too often the case). By the time survivors reach adulthood and clear recall, the limit for civil relief often has expired.

Rhode Island Bishop Thomas Tobin came from Pennsylvania, hotbed of an immense, ignored sex scandal. Grand jury reports estimate 300 priests participated in sexual crimes against more than 1,000 boys and girls. Charges include beatings, forced oral/anal sex, and the rape of a young girl later forced to abort.

As auxiliary bishop, and later as bishop, Tobin was surrounded by coverups and settlements during that scandal. He offers no explanation about what he knew, or did, to stop violence against Pennsylvania’s children, unbelievably claiming it was not his responsibility.

Taking Pen in Hand

DALLAS (TX)
VanishingPredators.com

December 2, 2018

By Dan Carlson

Question: What happens to predator priests after they have been laicized?

Answer: In most instances … nothing.

Though harsh, this is the cruel reality clergy sex abuse victims confront upon learning that, in the overwhelming majority of cases, their abuser will avoid prosecution because the statute of limitations has expired on the crimes for which he would have otherwise been charged. For the Catholic Church, of course, this is a good deal … it means they can simply cut the malefactor loose and remove him of his priestly vows. In other words, they can wash their hands of him.

By way of explanation, statutes of limitations are rules that prohibit prosecutors from charging someone with a crime committed more than a specified number of years earlier, and it is worth noting that the Catholic Church has spent millions of dollars lobbying in opposition to bills that would extend statutes of limitations for child sex abuse cases.

But back to that predator priest who has been defrocked and expelled from ministry … what comes next for him? Where does he go? Sadly, the answer is that nobody really knows for, in many cases, he just drops out of sight. Had he been convicted of a sex offense, he would have to register as a sex offender and thereafter comply with limits on his contact with children, living arrangements and employment. But absent a conviction, he can quietly take up residence in any unsuspecting neighborhood he chooses.

Think about that for a moment … a known child predator can reside, anonymously and without restrictions, in close proximity to children … and the position of the Church is: “Not my problem.”

There are three things the Catholic Church must do to correct this outrageous situation:

1. Create a national data base naming all clergy removed after credible allegations of child sexual abuse. This information should appear publicly in two places: on the website of any Diocese where the disgraced cleric served, and on a master list maintained by the United States Council of Catholic Bishops.

Only on 10: Bishop Tobin addresses sex abuse scandal in Catholic Church

PROVIDENCE (RI)
WJAR Channel 10

December 7, 2018

By Katie Davis

Bishop Thomas Tobin spoke with NBC 10’s Gene Valicenti about the Catholic Church’s ongoing sex abuse scandal during a taping of 10 News Conference Friday.

Before coming to the Diocese of Providence, Tobin had previously worked in the Diocese of Pittsburgh. A grand jury investigation in Pennsylvania revealed decades of child sexual abuse by priests there, with hundreds of victims.

"When [allegations of sexual abuse] were reported, they were dealt with very quickly and very responsibly,” Tobin said of his time in Pennsylvania. “So, it's not as if I didn't care. It's not as if those things were being ignored or covered up...but they were being handled by different people and different offices. And that's why my name was not involved in the grand jury report, because I didn't deal with those issues."

A similar grand jury investigation in Rhode Island would require changing state law, something the incoming Attorney General told NBC 10 he supports.

"What allegations have been made? You let people know that you're willing to listen to any allegations that are out there. Then, you review them and decide how to proceed,” said Attorney General Elect Peter Neronha.

Houston, we have a problem

LONDON (ENGLAND)
Catholic Herald

December 6, 2018

By Jordan Bloom

On November 28, District Attorney Brett Ligon of Montgomery County, Texas, led the raid on the chancery of Cardinal Daniel DiNardo of Houston-Galveston, the president of the US bishops’ conference, alongside Texas Rangers, the Conroe Police Department and an unnamed federal agency. The search warrant in Houston was issued to obtain evidence against Fr Manuel La Rosa-Lopez, who allegedly abused minors in Conroe, Texas. (He denies the allegations.)

The “main focus” of the raid was to gather information on Fr La Rosa-Lopez, but Tyler Dunman, a spokesman for the Montgomery County DA, told the Catholic Herald that if evidence of more crimes were uncovered in the raid, it could be used for more prosecutions.

“With any search warrant, if you uncover additional criminal evidence or evidence of wrongdoing then you can arrest it at that time,” he said.

When asked whether, if such evidence were found, they would pursue it, he said: “Sure, yes.”

Dunman confirmed that “we do have federal authorities who are working with us”, but declined to say what agency they came from.

In Monday’s Houston Chronicle, Cardinal DiNardo wrote: “This archdiocese takes every allegation of wrongdoing brought to our attention seriously, and is fully cooperating – and will cooperate – with any and all investigations related to the clergy abuse of minors.”

Yet Dunman struck a critical note. He said that “we have received certain items” when asked specifically, but added that investigators had not been given any kind of blanket access to diocesan records.

“Frankly, we knew that there were a ton more that we had not received,” he said. “Cooperation for us means that when you have a priest who’s arrested for child molestation, you would turn over everything voluntarily as soon as possible to the authorities. That would be cooperation in our mind, and that hasn’t happened.”

When It Comes to the Clergy Abuse Scandals, the Laity Are Not Going to Save Us

NEW YORK (NY)
Patheos blog

December 8, 2018

By Rebecca Bratten Weiss

In recent months, as revelations about the depth and breadth of the clerical sex abuse and institutional cover-ups continue to unfold, we Catholics return ever and again to the same question: what can be done about it? What changes are needed in the church, in order to prevent this atrocity ever from happening again, at least on so vast a scale?

For some, only a complete stripping down, overhaul, and reformation will suffice. Others have gone even further, to the point at which they no longer view the church, once their home, as authentic or valid. This is understandable, of course – but even many of us who understand and sympathize feel we must remain and work for change. But what change? What will make a difference. Clearly, greater transparency is needed. It seems obvious that the concentration of power in the hands of a few men – and only men – creates a breeding ground for abuse, on many levels. The church’s failures to deal directly with complex issues about sexuality need to be remedied. And yes, the laity need to be involved – much more involved.

However, simply dissipating the power of the clergy and distributing it among lay-persons is no automatic fix. This is evident in the extent to which lay women and men are themselves complicit in covering up sex abuse, both within the church, in its vicinities, and without.

Take, for instance, the many men who knew about Weinstein’s assaults on women, and kept their mouth shut. Consider the men – including Donald Trump, and Bill Clinton – who turned a blind eye to Jeffrey Epstein’s criminal exploits with underage girls – or even worked to cover them up, leaving his many young victims abandoned without justice.

Or consider the case of the superstar feminist professor Avital Ronell, accused of repeatedly assaulting a student. Did her fellow feminists call her out? Did #MeToo mean being consistent, even when it was a “friend in the field”? Regretfully, it did not. Even Judith Butler, who should have known better, came to the rescue of Ronell.

Catholic Church's redress backflip angers survivors

AUSTRALIA
The World Today

December 7, 2018

By Samantha Donovan

Abuse survivors and their lawyers are furious the Catholic Church has changed its approach to the National Redress Scheme and will now have its dioceses and other entities join up individually rather than as a single national body.

They say the decision adds to the trauma of victims and will leave many wondering if they will ever get redress.

Duration: 3min 17sec

Only on 10: Bishop Tobin addresses sex abuse scandal in Catholic Church

PROVIDENCE (RI)
WJAR Channel 10

December 7, 2018

By Katie Davis

Bishop Thomas Tobin spoke with NBC 10’s Gene Valicenti about the Catholic Church’s ongoing sex abuse scandal during a taping of 10 News Conference Friday.

Before coming to the Diocese of Providence, Tobin had previously worked in the Diocese of Pittsburgh. A grand jury investigation in Pennsylvania revealed decades of child sexual abuse by priests there, with hundreds of victims.

"When [allegations of sexual abuse] were reported, they were dealt with very quickly and very responsibly,” Tobin said of his time in Pennsylvania. “So, it's not as if I didn't care. It's not as if those things were being ignored or covered up...but they were being handled by different people and different offices. And that's why my name was not involved in the grand jury report, because I didn't deal with those issues."

A similar grand jury investigation in Rhode Island would require changing state law, something the incoming Attorney General told NBC 10 he supports.

"What allegations have been made? You let people know that you're willing to listen to any allegations that are out there. Then, you review them and decide how to proceed,” said Attorney General Elect Peter Neronha.

Long Island nuns push for change amid growing ‘#ChurchToo’ movement

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Post

December 8, 2018

By Melissa Klein

Two Long Island nuns have become defiant “#ChurchToo” activists, posting public messages to end abuse in “faith communities” at the same time their convent supervisor, a priest accused of sexual misconduct, was allowed to return to his Brooklyn church.

The Greek Orthodox sisters, shown in their habits, began their Instagram and Facebook campaigns in October as Rev. Gerasimos Makris was reinstated to the pulpit at Holy Cross Church in Bay Ridge.

Makris — an imperious figure who insists on his parishioners kissing his hand — confessed to “inappropriate interactions with two adult women” and an archdiocese “spiritual court” recommended he be banned. But church higher-ups put him back anyway.

The scandal is the latest black eye for the Greek Orthodox church and the Holy Cross parish, whose former leader, the Rev. George Passias, was defrocked after The Post revealed his affair with the married parochial school principal, whom he impregnated, and their kinky “cake crushing” fetish.

On Oct. 10, just as Makris was returning, the nuns began advocating for change, posting powerful photos of themselves holding signs with messages that read: “believe survivors,” “silence isn’t spiritual,” “end rape culture” and “take a stand.”

In a November post, they wrote “Sexual abuse is real. It happens in our families, our local communities + even our faith communities, in every Christian denomination including the Orthodox Church.”

Catholic church abuse scandals not over yet

MARTINSBURG (WV)
Martinsburg Journal

December 9, 2018

By Mike Myer

Among the tragedies of the sexual abuse scandal that continues to rock the Roman Catholic Church is that trust in the institution can be restored only by adding names to the lists of predator priests being released all across the country. Undoubtedly, some of the clergy responsible for wrongdoing, sometimes decades ago, have not yet been named.

If they remain secret, some of the church’s critics, including many Catholics, will wonder whether the abuse did continue but was not punished.

Veteran newspaper journalists tend to be champion skeptics. We don’t really trust anyone unless they give us good reason to do so.

So take this as my professional opinion: I believe many in the Catholic Church, perhaps because laypeople have relatively new power, are as sickened as anyone else about the long, sordid record of abuse. It’s my impression attitudes really have changed.

Expect evidence of whether I’m right within the next year or so.

Last Thursday, the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston released a list of clergy “credibly accused” of abusing minors sexually. It included 31 names, of which 18 allegedly sinned while working at Catholic institutions in West Virginia. The other 13 served here, but were not accused of wrongdoing until they went to other states.

The mere announcement on Oct. 24 that the church would compile and release such a list seems to have been the catalyst for at least one new complaint. A report of abuse was made to the diocese on Oct. 26.

Church officials say they hope their action will prompt other victims of clergy abuse to come forward. Again, there is reason to believe many who were targeted by predator priests have kept their silence for many, many years. The Oct. 26 report involved alleged abuse in 1982 or 1983. Someone waited that long before deciding church officials ought to be told.

Raid of archdiocese office puts local priest back in spotlight

BAYTOWN (TX)
Baytown Sun

December 9, 2018

By Matt Hollis

Several files seized in a raid by law enforcement agencies at a Catholic archdiocese office in Montgomery County also included ones for a Baytown priest, who was cleared of sexual abuse allegations by the church years ago.

Priest in dock who used to teach in Wigan on child sex charges

MANCHESTER (ENGLAND)
Wigan Observer Post

December 9, 2018

A Catholic priest who used to teach in Wigan has appeared before a judge accused of a series of historical child sex crimes.

Fr Michael Higginbottom is charged with a total of six indecent assaults, two counts of buggery, a rape and a further count of gross indecency. All the counts concern complainants who were boys at the time and date back several decades.

Higginbottom, now 75, taught physics at St Joseph’s Roman Catholic seminary at Roby Mill, Up Holland, in the 1970s.

Vince Latterly he has been a resident of West Farm Road in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. He did not enter any pleas during a brief hearing at Preston Crown Court. This may take place on December 19. A provisional trial date, should he deny the charges, was set for June 19 at the same court next year and Higginbottom was released on bail.

Late Pocatello priest on list of alleged abusers

POCATELLO (ID)
Idaho State Journal

December 9, 2018

Two Roman Catholic Jesuit provinces that cover nearly half the U.S. released the names Friday of more than 150 priests and other ministry leaders who were found to have “credible allegations” of sexual abuse made against them dating to the 1950s.

One of the names on the list is Segundo Llorente, who served at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Pocatello from 1982 to 1984. He also served at St. Stanislaus Church in Lewiston from 1984 to 1989. He died in 1989, according to the Jesuit’s release. The claims were for 1962-1963, and the mid-1960s, for alleged sexual abuse of a minor.

The Jesuits say many claims were received after accused priests had died. So in those cases thorough investigations could not be undertaken. Deceased individuals are included in the list based on the fact that an accusation was reported.

Jesuits West, which covers 10 western states, said its internal investigation found credible allegations against 111 priests, brothers or priests in training who were connected to it dating back to 1950. No one on the list is involved in public ministry any longer, it said.

Earlier, the Jesuits U.S. Central and Southern Province, which covers 13 states along with Puerto Rico and the Central American country of Belize, released the names of 42 men who had ties to the province going back to 1955. It said four are still members of the province but are not active in ministry and live in supervised housing.

Many of the men on the two lists have died, and others have been dismissed of ordination, officials said. Most of the men on the lists were priests.

Catholic Church has work ahead to rebuild trust

SNTA FE (NM)
The New Mexican

December 9, 2018

The Archdiocese of Santa Fe’s decision to seek Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection is the latest twist in a long and often sordid story of individual abuse against children, protected by one of the most powerful institutions in New Mexico.

That the bankruptcy announcement came just before Advent, the beginning of the church liturgical year — the countdown to the birth of a savior, the light of the world — brings an ironic touch to the whole proceeding.

In New Mexico, the ugly scandal of decades of abuse by predatory priests, the institutional church’s role in covering up crime and sin and the long suffering of thousands of victims is a lingering, open wound.

While this is a scandal across the U.S. church, indeed the world, New Mexico first faced it as a state back in the 1990s. We are facing it still. Even now, the future of the worldwide Catholic Church will be diminished if leaders do not correct the sins of the past. Patience is fast running out.

In the ’90s, the faithful and others watched with horror as numerous stories of pedophile priests surfaced, lawsuits were filed and settled and a new archbishop, Michael J. Sheehan, was brought in to clean up the mess. At least on the surface, it appeared that the zero-tolerance policy for dealing with offenses worked, that the church was setting things right with victims and that — blessedly — few new claims of abuse came to light.

The local church seemed determined to put the safety of the people in the pews ahead of its reputation. Finally.

Over the past several years, however, it has become apparent that the rot in the church was more entrenched than realized. More lawsuits were filed. Again, they were from incidents decades in the past, but it still meant more crimes against children had to be set right. The breadth and depth of the abuse would mean more millions in settlements; this is after 300 claims already resolved, with the archdiocese paying out millions. The bankruptcy will protect church assets, setting up a process to handle claims equitably.

Believing the unbelievable: How an Altoona lawyer took on the Catholic church over clergy sex abuse

ALTOONA (PA)
Pittsburgh Tribune Review

December 9, 2018

By Deb Erdley

Mary Hutchison was desperate.

It was 1987 when the devout Catholic mother of three knocked on the door of Richard Serbin’s Altoona law office.

Hutchison had learned her troubled son Michael, then 19 and locked in a forensic psychiatric ward, had been raped repeatedly over seven of his then 19 years of life. The perpetrator: Father Francis Luddy, their beloved parish priest at St. Therese’s Catholic Church. The priest abused him between the time he was 11 and 17.

Two years later, he had become a male prostitute and petty criminal. He suffered addiction. He attempted suicide.

The desperate mother’s pleas for the church to help her son slammed headlong into a brick wall.

Serbin was Hutchison’s last hope. Michael was fast approaching his 2oth birthday, and the statute of limitations for civil cases was about to expire.

A Pittsburgh native, Serbin, who is Jewish, was the only personal injury lawyer in town who might take such a case, Hutchison was told. He agreed to interview Michael.

That interview launched a 20-year legal battle that pierced a veil of secrecy that protected predator priests for decades. It set down a trail of bread crumbs that eventually led to a statewide grand jury investigation and damning report. The odyssey took 30 years.

Details of that first meeting have not been dimmed by the decades that have passed.

New legal troubles for the Archdiocese of Santa Fe

ALBUQUERQUE (NM)
Albuquerque Journal

December 9, 2018

By Colleen Heild

Former priest John Feit, center, appeared in a Hidalgo County, Texas, courtroom on Dec. 7, 2017, where a jury found him guilty of the 1960 murder of Irene Garza, a parishioner and schoolteacher. A new lawsuit filed in Albuquerque says Feit became a leader at the Servants of the Paraclete treatment center in Jemez Springs after the crime. (Nathan Lambrecht/The Monitor/AP)

Seven years after he murdered a female parishioner in Texas in 1960, Father John Feit found refuge in Jemez Springs, where he was a supervisor at the Servants of the Paraclete center for Catholic priests with psychosexual problems.

According to a new lawsuit, Feit documented an agreement with the Archdiocese of Santa Fe in 1967 to supply pedophile priests to New Mexico parishes without telling parishioners or other working priests in the archdiocese about the potential danger to local children.

Editorial: Archdiocese bankruptcy won’t hide ugly truth

ALBUQUERQUE (NM)
Albuquerque Journal

December 9, 2018

In announcing that the Archdiocese of Santa Fe would seek bankruptcy protection, Archbishop John Wester said the action would help ensure fair compensation for sex-abuse victims. His office went on to proclaim in a diocesan letter distributed to the faithful at Mass last Sunday that “for over 25 years, the Archdiocese of Santa Fe has been a leader among its peers in addressing sexual abuse of children by clergy.”

Wester is correct on the first point, given the number of potential cases pending and others not yet filed. Victims will be represented and have their days in court. They may do so confidentially if they wish, but in general these proceedings will be public. And bankruptcy protection will allow the Archdiocese to continue to provide valuable services through parishes and schools even as lawyers and the court sort through financial questions like what the Archdiocese’s assets really are and determine the status of assets transferred to parishes by the Archdiocese in recent years.

No surprise here. Bankruptcy proceedings are about money, property and who gets what.

But the statement about being a national leader in the clergy sex-abuse area gives new meaning to the proposition that everything is relative, and that what happened here should NOT be judged alone but in context of what has happened in other states like Pennsylvania – where the church was rocked by the results of an investigation by that state’s attorney general.

These ‘men of God’ sexually abused children. Then they found refuge at other churches

FT. WORTH (TX)
Star Telegram

December 9, 2018

By Sarah Smith

Pastor Bruce Goddard acted immediately when he learned the principal at Faith Baptist Church’s school in Wildomar, California, had been intimately involved with a 17-year-old student.

He rented the 35-year-old principal a U-Haul and shipped him out of state. He did not call the police.

The accused wound up at First Baptist Church of Hammond, Indiana, a church affiliated with Goddard’s alma mater, working again with teenagers. The abused girl was later told that church officials in Indiana were aware of his involvement with her when he arrived.

An eight-month investigation by the Star-Telegram shows that what happened at Faith Baptist is just one example in a nationwide pattern of cover-ups and shuffling of suspected abusers among churches and universities that, like Faith Baptist, are part of the independent fundamental Baptist movement.

The cover-ups are reminiscent of the scandals of the Roman Catholic Church, but distinctly different.

Decisions in the Catholic Church are made within a hierarchical structure that governs all churches. Independent fundamental Baptist churches operate with no oversight or structure outside their own walls.

One thing does bind the churches that face abuse accusations: a culture that uses fear to control and gives men in power the role of unquestioned and ultimate authority. In that environment, abuse has visited scores of fundamental Baptist churches.

And many abusers have escaped consequence-free, often with the help of the pastor in charge.

Victims of clergy abuse call for action against those accused in church lists

WESTWEGO (LA)
WWL TV

December 8, 2018

By Jacqueline Quynh

As more clergy accused of abuse are being named, victims say they're tired of hearing about names. They want action.

"At first glance, it seems like a really good thing, but then you look a little bit closer," Ashley Berry Allen said.

Berry is still working through the abuse she says happened at the hands of a priest when she attended Our Lady of Prompt Succor School in Westwego.

"But then you look a little bit closer and you see that these names are mostly coming from the 70s and 80s and back," she said.

Just a month ago, she shared with Eyewitness News her difficult story after the New Orleans Archdiocese released a list of clergy members with credible accusations against them. Her alleged abuser wasn't on the list and she says her case happened in the early 2000s. We contacted the Archdiocese then for comment, but it would not comment specifically on her case, only affirming it takes all accusations seriously and would add names as necessary following investigations.

"They could have released the names 5 years ago they could have released it 10 years, and they're only doing it now because they're forced to because they've been exposed by the grand jury in Pennsylvania," Tim Lennon said.

Lennon is a victim's advocate, and heads the Survivor's Network of Those Abused by Priests. He's critical of the new list.

December 8, 2018

Sexual assault survivors react to allegations against Jesuits in Colorado

AURORA (CO)
Fox 31 News

December 8, 2018

BY Evab Kruegel

Catholic Jesuit provinces covering much of the United States have begun releasing names of hundreds of Jesuits who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse dating back to the 1940s.

The list includes 13 Jesuits who worked in Colorado, including 8 at Regis Jesuit High School, now located in Aurora.

"What we're looking at now is the tip of an iceberg," says Jeb Barrett the Denver leader of SNAP (Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests).

Barrett says it's not uncommon for victim-survivors to wait years to share their stories. In fact, he says he waited years himself.

"I didn't touch on my own abuse until I was 63 years old," he says. "I never even told my parents."

Barrett says he was abused by a number of people in power he trusted, including a priest in Montana.

"That freaked me out. A supposed man of God was doing those things and it involved me, and I lived with that shame for a long time."

Barrett moved to Colorado in 2004 and has spent the past 14 years counseling victims of similar assaults.

In a letter to the Regis Jesuit community, President David Card said two Jesuits on the list, Mark A. Clark, SJ and Paul C. Pilgram, SJ, had allegations related to Regis Jesuit students.

Chilean prosecutors look at rural Catholic diocese for evidence in abuse case

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Los Angeles Times

By Jorge Poblete and Chris Kraul

The offices of the Roman Catholic diocese in Chillan, a small agricultural city in southern Chile, recently had some unusual and unexpected visitors: Chilean prosecutor Emiliano Arias and 10 armed police officers.

Arias walked briskly past the receptionist and climbed the stairs to the third floor, entering a green walled room dominated by a large framed photo of a smiling Pope John Paul II, who visited Chile in 1987.

After exchanging a few words with nervous church staff members and explaining his mission, Arias and police immediately began going over personnel records stored in file cabinets along one wall in the next office.

Currently, more than 190 people across Chile are being investigated for alleged sexual abuse and cover-ups linked to the Roman Catholic Church, including 113 priests and nine bishops, according to the Chilean national prosecutor’s office.

Of 251 victims, at least 109 were minors as young as 5 years old when they were abused, dating back to the 1940s. The number of cases under investigation has risen from a year ago when 83 people were being investigated in the alleged abuse of 162 people between 2000 and 2017.

Arias and his team were looking for evidence in the cases of eight priests from the Chillan diocese, including now removed Bishop Carlos Pellegrin, suspected of participating in or covering up the abuse of a dozen youths since the 1970s. While Arias pored over files in the town 250 miles south of Santiago, the capital, three other teams made similar raids on diocesan offices in Valparaiso, Concepcion and Osorno.

A reality check on expectations for February child abuse summit

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

December 9, 2018

By John L. Allen Jr.

Under any circumstances, the announcement in September that Pope Francis plans to convene a summit Feb. 21-24 for all the presidents of bishops’ conferences around the world, along with the Vatican’s senior leadership, to discuss the clerical sexual abuse scandals in the Church would have been big news.

After the Vatican invoked that summit in November in instructing the U.S. bishops to stand down in adopting new accountability measures, however, telling them they need to wait until after February, it was foreordained that American analysts will treat February like Roosevelt and Stalin at Yalta - a high-stakes, history-making exercise.

Before expectations spiral completely out of control, however, it’s important to say this out loud: For all kinds of reasons, this is not going to be Yalta on sex abuse, and to hope that it will be is a fool’s errand.

Let’s lay out the reasons why, and then touch on what would actually count as success.

Some California priests accused of misconduct named. Fresno Diocese still investigating

FRESNO (CA)
Fresno Bee

December 08, 2018

By Yesenia Amaro and Victor Patton

Officials at the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno — which covers 87 Valley parishes — on Friday said they are continuing to investigate what information they may release regarding area priests accused of sexual misconduct, including the possibility of publicly identifying those priests by name.

Back in October the diocese acknowledged three of its priests were being investigated due to complaints.

A Friday news release from the diocese said it’s continuing to “survey how other dioceses are responding to the demand for an online posting of all accused priests, past and present, in addition to coming to a better understanding of any legal ramifications if due process of law has not been pursued according to Constitutional Rights.”

“Bishop (Armando X.) Ochoa will continue to engage a variety of professional opinions on this matter, both within the faith community and outside sources to ensure objectivity,” the release continued.

Jesuits name accused priests, including 20 who worked in Oregon

PORTLAND (OR)
Oregonian

December 8, 2018

By Jeff Manning

An organization overseeing Jesuit operations in 10 states released the names Friday of 111 Jesuit priests who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse against minors. Twenty of the priests worked in Oregon at least part of their careers.

The alleged cases of abuse date back to 1950. Eighty-three of the 111 accused are dead.

Nine of the 111 spent time at Jesuit High School, the exclusive westside private school.

“We did this out of a desire for transparency,” said Tracey Primrose, director of communications for Jesuits West, which is based in Portland. “We hope this will allow the victims to heal.”

The Jesuits are an influential order of priests numbering more than 16,000 worldwide. Jesuits also operate several high schools and universities, including St. Louis University and Marquette University.

The Jesuits have previously settled lawsuits across the country, including a $166 million settlement involving about 500 abuse claims in Oregon in 2011, which was one of the largest settlements involving clergy abuse allegations.

Former East St. Louis priest named on list of Jesuits accused of sexually abusing children

BELLEVILLE (IL)
Belleville News Democrat

December 8, 2018

BY Kelsey Landis

A priest with ties to a parish in East St. Louis has been named on a list of Jesuits accused of sexually abusing children.

Chester E. Gaiter died in August 2010 at the age of 70, but was assigned to five schools and parishes in the St. Louis area, including at St. Joseph’s Parish in East St. Louis.

The Jesuits U.S. Central and Southern Province released the names of dozens of priests with ties to the St. Louis area.

Gaiter served at St. Joseph’s Church for a year beginning in 1993, according to a previous report by the Belleville News-Democrat.

The Jesuits estimate Gaiter abused children between the 1970s and 1980s. He was never removed from the ministry. At the time the allegations were made, Gaiter was mentally incapacitated.

In 2007, a man accused Gaiter and three other priests of molesting him, according to a report in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch from the time. Gaiter had already retired when he was accused of the abuse. Three of the priests, including Gaiter, were teachers at Cardinal Ritter High School in St. Louis.

The archdiocese settled that case settlement with payments totaling $140,000 and a written apology to the victim and his family from the archdiocese.

St. Joseph Church in East St. Louis closed in 2006, according to the Belleville Diocese.

22 Jesuit clergy who served in Idaho mentioned in list of accused abusers

BOISE (ID)
East Idaho News

December 8, 2018

By Rett Nelson

More than 150 clergy are tied to “credible claims of sexual abuse of a minor or vulnerable adult, dating back to 1950,” according to a report from a Roman Cahtolic Jesuit province.

Twenty-two of the names on the list have ties to Idaho. The Associated Press reports most of the men on the list were priests and served at a parish somewhere in the state.

One of the men on the list is Peter O’Grady, who served at the Sacred Heart Church in Boise from 1980-1986. No one on the list is involved in public ministry any longer, reports the AP.

The Jesuits West Province of the Society of Jesus, the group who compiled the list says inclusion in the list does not imply that the claims are true and correct or that the accused individual has been found guilty of a crime or liable for civil claims. They also say many claims were received after an accused priest was deceased.

“While we attempted to be as thorough and accurate as possible in compiling the list, Jesuits West will undergo a review of our files in the spring of 2019,” their report states.

El arzobispado de Barcelona ayudó a huir a un cura pederasta en 1990

[Archdiocese of Barcelona helped accused priest flee in 1990]

MADRID (SPAIN)
El País

December 8, 2018

By Íñigo Domínguez, Daniel Verdú and Oriol Güell

EL PAÍS localiza en Ecuador al sacerdote, que fue enviado de misiones para evitar un juicio por abusos y ha estado 28 años oculto. La archidiócesis sabía de su paradero.

Jordi Ignasi Senabre, párroco de Polinyá, en Barcelona, desapareció tras ser acusado de abusar de un menor de 13 años en 1988, con una petición fiscal de cinco años de cárcel y nunca más se ha vuelto a saber de él. La Audiencia de la capital catalana le llamó a declarar en octubre de 1991 y no se presentó. El arzobispado de Barcelona argumentó que había salido del país "de misiones", pero no aclaró nada más. No hubo más noticias de su paradero hasta que Senabre fue arrestado en enero de 1994 en Uruguay, donde había entrado con un visado turístico. España pidió su extradición el 4 de marzo de ese año, pero fue denegada en junio. El país sudamericano no llegó ni a contestar, según confirma el ministerio de Justicia. El cura quedó libre y se perdió su pista. Hasta hoy. EL PAÍS le ha localizado en la diócesis de Santo Domingo de los Colorados, en Ecuador. Siempre estuvo allí, y el arzobispado de Barcelona siempre lo supo: lo mandó la propia diócesis en 1990 tras enviar una solicitud por carta, según confirma el vicario general de Santo Domingo, Galo Robalino. Contactado por este periódico, Sanabre ha colgado al saber que se trataba de un periodista español: "Se equivoca usted".

Los sacerdotes acusados de abusos que la Iglesia envió a las misiones

[Church sent accused priests on overseas missions]

MADRID (SPAIN)
El País

December 8, 2018

By Íñigo Domínguez and Daniel Verdú

EL PAÍS reconstruye la historia de 18 religiosos trasladados a América Latina y a África. Algunos fueron descubiertos en España; otros, arrestados en esos destinos

La Iglesia española no solo ha utilizado el sistema de cambiar a sacerdotes de parroquia, o destino dentro de una orden, tras ser acusados de abusos de menores. Otro patrón de conducta de las últimas décadas ha sido trasladarlos al extranjero. Así lo confirman fuentes de los organismos vaticanos de Tutela de Menores, que reconocen que ha sido una táctica común en España y otros países. EL PAÍS ha documentado hasta 18 casos de curas denunciados o condenados por abusos que han recalado en otros países o han sido acusados o detenidos en el extranjero. En Chile, Ecuador, Perú, Bolivia, Venezuela, Honduras, Estados Unidos, Benín y Kenia.

Abusos en la Iglesia: Corte de Rancagua deja investigación en Santiago

[Rancagua Appeals Court leave clergy sex investigation to court in Santiago]

CHILE
BioBioChile

December 7, 2018

By Felipe Díaz and Erik López

La Corte de Apelaciones de Rancagua dejó en mano de tribunales capitalinos la tramitación de las causas que digan relación con sacerdotes de la Iglesia Católica que hubieran cometido abusos sexuales u otros delitos del mismo carácter.

Obispado de San Felipe ratifica en su puesto a cura condenado por abusos

[San Felipe diocese returns priest convicted of abuse to ministry]

CHILE
La Tercera

December 6, 2018

By María José Navarrete

El sacerdote Juan Carlos Orellana había sido apartado de sus funciones en agosto de este año. Exobispo Cristián Contreras le había “aconsejado” pedirle al Papa Francisco su dimisión del estado clerical.

El pasado martes 27 de noviembre, el administrador apostólico de la diócesis de San Felipe, Jaime Ortiz de Lazcano, informó a la comunidad los cambios de párrocos que se iban a implementar dentro del obispado. El objetivo era que los sacerdotes puedan “cumplir la misión de evangelizar entre el pueblo”.

Diocesan diddlers

SPRINGFIELD (IL)
Illinois Times

December 6, 2018

By Bruce Rushton

I wonder about Virginia Galloway.

In 2004, she sued the Diocese of Springfield, alleging an awful thing. In the late 1960s, when she was 10 years old, she said that the Rev. Richard Niebrugge took her under his care as a foster child and began sexually abusing her. A decade later, she said in her lawsuit, she gave birth to his child.

In 1983, five years after Galloway had a baby, Niebrugge died. But enablers remained, according to the lawsuit that named as defendants the Rev. Herman Niebrugge, the priest’s brother who died in 2004, and the Rev. Theodore Baumann, who retired in 2008 after a career spent as a holy man – last year, he was reported to be living at a retirement home for priests in Belleville. Both Herman Niebrugge and Baumann, Galloway said in her lawsuit, knew that she was being abused but didn’t report it and did nothing to stop it.

Courts ruled that Galloway didn’t sue soon enough, and her case was dismissed without being considered on its merits. Galloway had issues, her own lawyer acknowledged when she sued. Psychological problems included a multiple personality disorder brought on, at least in part, by being sexually abused by a priest, attorney Rex Carr said more than a decade ago. No DNA testing had been performed prior to filing suit, Carr told the media, but there were “millions of factual statements that connect him to her” and he expected that science would confirm claims made in court.

Expelled priest continues fight to be reinstated after sexual abuse allegations

BUFFALO (NY)
WIVB TV

December 8, 2018

By Daniel Telvock

Civil attorneys who defend priests accused of sexual abuse do not have any standing in the legal proceedings run by the Catholic Church.

That is the instruction local attorney Mike Taheri received from the Archbishop of Boston.

Taheri is the attorney for The Rev. Samuel Venne, who has denied allegations of sexually abusing minors decades ago.

Venne, 76, is on administrative leave after the Diocese in June “substantiated” the allegations against him. The diocese has refused to give Venne a copy of the allegations made against him, but a church official met with him in the spring to go over the complaints.

Taheri’s July 30 letter to Cardinal Sean O’Malley raised objections to the process employed by the Diocese of Buffalo for investigating allegations of sexual assault. He said the Diocese of Buffalo is violating basic due process rights of clergy.

“In the spirit of advancing these notions of basic fairness,” Taheri offered four proposals for church leaders to consider for improving the diocesan legal process, including opportunities for priests to offer evidence during preliminary investigations and giving accused clergy copies of the written allegations made by the accuser.

O’Malley responded Sept. 14 that the concerns he raised are matters of canon law, a set of laws and principles enforced by authorities of the Catholic Church. O’Malley is the chief confidant of Pope Francis on setting rules that protect minors from sexual abuse.

“The grave matter of a cleric’s dismissal from the clerical state is deliberated and adjudicated under canon law, it is not considered by civil law and the final determination regarding the process is reserved exclusively to the Holy See,” O’Malley wrote.

Vatican investigating reports of Chilean priests abusing nuns

ROME (ITALY)
PBS Newshour

December 7, 2018

The Vatican has launched an investigation into a small Chilean religious order of nuns after some sisters denounced sexual abuse at the hands of priests and mistreatment by their superiors, a turning point that shows the Holy See is now willing to investigate allegations of sexual violence against nuns.

The scandal at the Institute of the Good Samaritan was revealed publicly in an investigative report by Chilean national television earlier this year at the height of outrage over how Chilean Catholic hierarchy covered up decades of sexual abuse of children by priests.

In the report, a half-dozen current and former nuns said sisters were thrown out of the order after they denounced the abuse to their superiors. The report followed the sisters as they testified before two Vatican investigators sent to Chile by Pope Francis to get to the bottom of the church-wide scandal there.

In the report, a half-dozen current and former nuns said sisters were thrown out of the order after they denounced the abuse to their superiors.

Jesuits release names of clergy accused of sex abuse who served in Shreveport

SHREVEPORT (LA )
WTAL TV

December 8, 2018

By Nancy Cook

The Catholic Diocese of Shreveport learned the names of the Jesuit priests and brothers who were accused of sexual abuse of minors and either served at then Jesuit High School (now Loyola College Prep) or St. John’s Parish/Co-Cathedral, when Shreveport was part of the Alexandria/Shreveport Catholic Diocese, prior to June 1986.

Jesuit priests, or members of the “Society of Jesus” order, are separate from secular priests who serve in the particular diocese to which they are assigned.

That list, which will come from the Catholic Diocese of Alexandria, has not, as yet, been released.

The names released today came from the Jesuit superiors of U.S. Central and Southern Province, which includes Louisiana.

In releasing the names of these offenders, the local diocese emphasized does not mean the allegations stemmed from their assignment here, only that these men once served here.

If there are or were any credible allegations of sexual abuse in Shreveport, the Diocese of Shreveport will be notified when the names of offenders from the Diocese of Alexandria are released.

Below are the names, the years served in Shreveport, and the resolution of their cases, and in the case of those already deceased, the year of their death:

Bishop Zubik criticized during final listening session on abuse

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Tribune Review

December 7, 2018

By Jamie Martines

For healing to take place, a wound must be opened and inspected, according to Bishop David Zubik.

“And I think that happened tonight,” he said Thursday following the fourth and final listening session held by the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh.

Not everyone agreed.

“The bishop is sitting there expressionless and emotionless, and I don’t think he’s listening,” said Christine Saitta of Bethel Park, as she called for him to resign.

The meeting at St. Ferdinand Church in Cranberry Township was preceded by three other sessions held in Aliquippa, Jefferson Hills and Pittsburgh’s Oakland neighborhood over the past week. They were an open forum for members of the Catholic community to share comments, reflections and questions about the Pennsylvania grand jury report on sexual abuse, released in August, directly with Zubik.

Similar listening sessions were held throughout the Greensburg Diocese in recent weeks.

As he did three times before, Zubik sat in a chair in front of the altar, shifting his body to face speakers lined up along the pews on either side of St. Ferdinand Church. Over about three hours, at least 30 people took to the microphone.

Some shared personal stories of abuse at the hands of clergy or other adults working in Catholic churches, schools or other facilities. Others thanked Zubik for his service to the church and urged him to continue supporting victims of abuse, while several criticized the bishop and implored him to resign.

Diocese of Arlington priest, serving in Purcellville, placed on leave

ARLINGTON (VA)
Diocese of Arlington

December 7, 2018

Bishop Michael F. Burbidge has placed Father Ronald S. Escalante, Pastor of Saint Francis de Sales Church, Purcellville, on administrative leave pending the outcome of an investigation of alleged boundary violations involving a minor and adults which transgress the Code of Conduct for Clergy in the Diocese of Arlington. In accord with diocesan policy, these allegations were reported to local law enforcement and considered by the Diocesan Review Board. Father Escalante denies the accusations, and he has stated that he is cooperating fully with the investigation.

(Code of Conduct for Clergy: https://www.arlingtondiocese.org/Child-Protection/bgc-code-of-conduct-clergy.pdf)

While Father Escalante remains the Pastor of Saint Francis de Sales Church, Bishop Burbidge will appoint a Parochial Administrator for the parish as the Diocese continues this investigation.

Ex-priest not prosecuted over killing of wife, son; deemed not of sound mind

TOKYO (JAPAN)
Tokyo Reporter

December 8, 2018

Prosecutors have announced the non-prosecution of a former priest who was accused of killing his wife and son and mutilating their corpses at their residence in Sapporo earlier this year. Prosecutors deemed him of unsound mind, reports the Sankei Shimbun (Dec. 7).

On August 25, Masahito Nagaoka, 60, visited a police station in Toyohira Ward to report that the bodies of two relatives were in his residence. “I came to pay for the crime,” he added.

Officers arriving at the building found the bodies of Nagaoka’s wife, 58, and son, 19, with stab wounds in the bathroom. The results of autopsies revealed that both persons died due to suffocation, police said at the time.

The heads of the corpses had been removed with a knife. It is believed the bodies were mutilated after death, police said at the time.

Police subsequently accused Nagaoka of murder and abandoning and destruction of a corpse.

During the investigation, Nagaoka provided police with incomprehensible statements. “As a result of job stress, I couldn’t sleep,” he said. “Due to a chronic disease in my lower back, I could not sit seiza-style” — on the knees with feet tucked under the thighs — “and my work suffered.”

72 Diocese of Orange priests accused of sexual misconduct in law firm report

ORANGE COUNTY (CA)
Orange County Register

December 6, 2018

By Scott Schwebke

A Los Angeles law firm on Thursday released the names of 72 priests it claims are associated with the Catholic Diocese of Orange and are suspected of sexual assault.

The priests’ identities, detailed in a 60-page report, have never been disclosed by the diocese and are kept hidden from public view in a “secret archive” maintained by the church, Mike Reck, an attorney for Jeff Anderson & Associates, said during a news conference.

“We are doing this because the Diocese of Orange has not,” Reck said. “It’s important because the release of these identities sends a message to survivors of abuse that they are not alone, that this matters and that healing can begin.”

On the same day, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles released an updated list of 54 priests accused of sexual abuse of minors since 2008, with the archbishop issuing a public apology to victims of clergy sex abuse.

The Register is not releasing the names of the priests on this list because they have not been criminally charged.

Although the Diocese of Orange has released two lists, one in 2004 naming 16 priests and another in 2016 naming 14 priests suspected of sexual abuse, those disclosures are contradictory, incomplete and inadequate, Reck insisted.

Eleven who worked at Jesuit College Prep in Dallas are on list of clergy 'credibly accused' of sexually abusing minors

DALLAS (TX)
Dallas Morning News

December 7, 2018

By David Tarrant

Eleven men who previously worked at a Dallas high school were included on a list released Friday of clergy members “credibly accused” of sexual abuse of a minor.

None of the 42 priests and religious brothers on the list — published online by Jesuits of the USA Central and Southern Province — currently serves in the public ministry, according to a statement accompanying the list. Many served in the 1960s, 1970s or 1980s.

Of the 11 clergy members who worked at Jesuit College Preparatory School of Dallas, eight are now dead. And many on the list had already been accused publicly.

“These allegations involve heinous acts committed many years ago,” said Michael Earsing, Jesuit Dallas president, in a written statement. “I personally know of no credible reports of sexual misconduct with a minor occurring here in more than 20 years.”

The list’s release comes as the Catholic Church worldwide continues to deal with its sex abuse crisis and allegations of cover-ups. As part of an effort toward more transparency, many dioceses and religious orders have published similar lists of "credibly accused" priests.

Encino priest won’t be charged with sexual assault, but career in ministry is over

LOS ANGELES (CA)
LA Daily News

December 7, 2018

By Brian Rokos

The priest at an Encino parish who was placed on leave after allegations of sexually abusing minors will not be charged with crimes related to those six accusers, the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office said Friday, Dec. 7.

The Archdiocese of Los Angeles in January placed Father Juan Cano, an associate pastor at Our Lady of Grace Catholic Church, on administrative leave in January after reports of “inappropriate contact” involving “several females” in the parish. The Los Angeles Police Department and an archdiocese internal review board investigated the allegations.

Then Thursday, Cano was included in an updated list of 54 priests accused of sexual abuse of minors since 2008 that the archdiocese released.

But Friday, the District Attorney’s Office released documents explaining why Cano would not be charged in each of six cases. The accuser was victimized while Cano served at Our Lady of Grace in five instances; the sixth accuser was a parishioner at St. James Parish in Redondo Beach, where Cano was a visiting priest.

Although Cano will not be charged in these cases and new accusers could come forward, the Catholic Church is removing Cano from the ministry, said Adrian Marquez, the archdiocese’s director of media relations. The process will go through the Vatican. Cano has no right of appeal, she said.

“It’s not his choice. He is not going to be allowed to be a priest anymore,” Marquez said.

One accuser said Cano inappropriately touched her several times when she was a student and altar server; there was insufficient evidence to prosecute a felony or misdemeanor, the document said. A second accuser said Cano touched her inappropriately; the DA declined to prosecute when the accuser said she would not testify.

A third accuser said she and Cano befriended each other and he inappropriately touched her; the DA stated that it could not prove a crime had occurred. A fourth accuser said Cano committed two crimes against her; the DA said it could not prove that a crime happened in one instance and that the statute of limitations had expired in another.

A fifth accuser said Cano inappropriately touched her twice; the DA said it couldn’t prove that a crime occurred. The sixth accuser said she was a victim of lewd acts and sexual battery; the DA said the statute of limitations had run out on both crimes.

Priests who worked in Yakima County over decades listed as potential abusers

YAKIMA (WA)
Yakima Herald

December 8, 2018

By Tammy Ayer

Several priests who served at Catholic churches in Yakima County appear on a list released Friday of Jesuits with credible claims of sexual abuse of a minor or vulnerable adults.

The list includes Jesuits who are or were members of Jesuits West Province, the former California and the former Oregon Provinces, against whom a credible claim of sexual abuse of someone under age 18 or a vulnerable adult has been made, according to a news release. Jesuits West takes in Arizona, Alaska, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington.

“This list of Jesuits with credible claims of sexual abuse of a minor or vulnerable adult, dating to 1950, is being published as part of our province’s ongoing commitment to transparency and accountability,” the news release said.

“Inclusion on this list does not imply that the claims are true or correct or that the accused individual has been found guilty of a crime or liable for civil claims,” it said.

“In many instances, the claims were made several years or decades after the alleged events and were not capable of an investigation and determination.”

Jesuits with credible claims of abuse who served in the Yakima Valley are:

• Arnold R. Beezer, accused of sexual abuse of a minor in the 1970s. Beezer served at St. Joseph Church in Yakima from 1980-87. Beezer has been removed from ministry and lives at a retirement home for clergy in California.

Jesuit list of credibly accused priests includes three who worked in Grand Coteau

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Advocate

December 7, 2018

By Ramon Vargas, John Simerman and Ben Myers

In a move aimed at restoring trust with parishioners amid a clergy abuse scandal that has engulfed the Catholic Church worldwide, the Jesuit order on Friday revealed the names of 42 clergy members — mostly priests — suspected of sexually molesting children while they worked in a region that includes Louisiana.

Three of the former priests on the list released Friday had worked in Grand Coteau and one of those also worked at a Jesuit-run parish in north Baton Rouge. Friday's disclosure also resurrected disclosures about the Manresa Retreat House in Convent in St. James Parish. Its former director, the Rev. Thomas Naughton of the old New Orleans Province of the Jesuits, was stripped of his duties in California in 2002 after accusations he had molested a boy in 1978 in Dallas.

The Jesuits' disclosure Friday listed only where the men had served. It did not say where any of the alleged abuse occurred.

One of the priests who worked at Grand Coteau was Norman J. Rogge, who was twice convicted of sex crimes against minors but continued working for the church, according to previous news accounts and bishopaccountability.org, a website dedicated to tracking abuse by clergy.

Forgotten victims of priest sexual abuse. They were not children but could they consent?

SYDNEY (AUSTRALIA)
Sydney Morning Herald

December 8, 2018

By Farrah Tomazin

Christine James* was 17 when she met the man who would spend years treating her like his dirty little secret.

At first, she was flattered by the attention of a Catholic priest: confused yet elated that such a figure could be drawn to her.

Now, she realises she was his perfect prey: young and vulnerable, from a strict religious family where male authority was to be respected and feared. And in the hierarchy of her small-town church, there was no greater authority than Father Martin.*

Christine was barely an adult when the priest’s attention switched from pastoral to sexual. With that, Father Martin - 11 years her senior - became far more controlling.

He’d ask her to bring him breakfast after Mass, then got her to lie down so he could rub himself against her. He got her pregnant during university, and then enlisted two fellow priests to help him convince her to have an abortion.

Dozens of Montana priests accused of sex abuse were moved to new posts, report shows

BILLINGS (MT)
Billings Gazette

December 8, 2018

By Matt Hoffman

A new report outlining abuse accusations against Jesuit priests includes dozens of priests who worked in Montana churches, missions and schools — and shows that at least 11 priests were accused while working in the state.

Many of the accusations are against priests already identified in bankruptcy reports for the Great Falls/Billings and Helena dioceses. But the Jesuit Order report includes dates of alleged abuse and new "credible claims" against priests. It also includes work history information that confirms priests were frequently shuffled between postings, including after alleged abuse.

"The People of God demand and deserve transparency," Scott Santarosa, the leader of a Jesuit Order province covering 10 western states including Montana, wrote in an online open letter. "We hope that this act of accountability will help victims and their families in the healing process."

Friday's report shows the results of an internal investigation. Santarosa's letter said the province will have a consultant and former FBI executive review files in 2019, and any priests with new credible allegations will be identified. The Jesuit Order is a branch of the Roman Catholic Church with about 17,000 priests and brothers.

17 Jesuit priests with ties to St. Louis named on sexual abuse list

ST. LOUIS (MO)

St. Louis Post-Dispatch
December 8, 2018

By Nassim Benchaabane

A regional Jesuit province based here became on Friday the latest in a number of Catholic institutions across the country to release lists naming priests credibly accused of sexual abuse.

The Jesuits U.S. Central and Southern Province, which includes Missouri and Southern Illinois, released a list of 42 priests and other ministry officials. They said the abuse allegations went back to 1955.

“The storm that the Church experiences today calls forth from us an unprecedented and yet needed response,” Provincial Ronald Mercier said in a prepared statement. “Silence in the face of the events of recent months cannot be an option.”

Seventeen of those named worked in the St. Louis area, according to the list. Twelve of them worked at St. Louis University High School during their ministry.

Re-opened sex abuse case against Catholic church 'continuation of my fight': survivor

REGINA (CANADA)
Regina Leader Post

December 7, 2018

By Jane Sims

When she accepted a civil settlement from the Roman Catholic Church 18 years ago, Irene Deschenes was defeated.

“We are tired, we want closure and are hesitant to believe we can or will get justice from the court process,” she wrote in an email to her lawyer before accepting the terms in 2000.

What Deschenes, the Catholic Diocese of London and disgraced ex-priest Charles Sylvestre wouldn’t know is that settlement would send Deschenes on a determined course to expose the abusive Sylvestre and hold the church accountable.

In a ground-breaking decision, Superior Court Justice David Aston, who quoted Deschenes’ email, granted her motion and allowed the sexual abuse survivor to re-open her settlement after almost two decades.

“My goal here is to hold the Roman Catholic Church accountable for their unspeakable treatment of survivors,” Deschenes said at a news conference here on Thursday. “This is a continuation of my fight for justice, for me, and other known and unknown survivors of sexual abuse by priests and other religions.”

When Deschenes, abused between 1970 and 1973 when she attended St. Ursula’s Church in Chatham, and another survivor filed a civil suit against the diocese, Sylvestre hadn’t been convicted of 47 counts of indecent assault of little girls across the region and the church hadn’t been swamped with civil claims.

Bankruptcy just latest shield for rapist priests

ALBUQUERQUE (NM)
Albuquerque Journal

December 7, 2018

By Martin J. Chavez, former Albuquerque mayor

Faced with civil and possible criminal litigation from victims of the horrific rapes of children by area priests, the Archdiocese of Santa Fe has announced its intent to declare bankruptcy. Archbishop John C. Wester disingenuously says this is to assist the “pursuit of justice for all victims.” The Chapter 11 filing is simply a way of avoiding responsibility and is just one part of a continuing cover-up by the Archdiocese.

Contemplate for a moment the horror of a child raped by a priest and the impact of that rape on the child as he or she grows into adulthood. The trauma doesn’t go away. I’m lucky to have spent eight years in parochial school – St. Charles and Holy Ghost – the latter years as an altar boy, and was never a victim. But some of my friends weren’t so fortunate, and I write this for them.

We now know that the Archdiocese was substantially aware for years that its priests were raping children and that it did little or nothing to rectify it. Most of what it did was cover it up and shield itself from the justice afforded victims through the courts. Here are just a few of the ways:

• To avoid liability, the Archdiocese began incorporating each parish separately to shield the individual parishes from the conduct of its rapist priests. Instead of moving priests from parish to parish, they moved assets from parish to parish.

• It then formed a trust to keep real estate away from victims. And as each victim comes forward, the church’s attorneys have grilled them as they would liars, questioning their integrity and their pain, as any insurance defense lawyer might in an auto accident case. They threaten to subpoena parents, children and siblings of victims. Most New Mexico Catholics don’t appreciate that our “one holy and apostolic church” is actually hundreds of separate corporate entities and that the place where Mass is held is held in a trust, primarily to keep it out of reach of rape victims.

Jesuits name 11 Sacramento priests accused of sexual abuse

SACRAMENTO (CA)
ABC 10 News

December 7, 2018

By Giacomo Luca

Eleven priests who served in Sacramento over the last 50 years were among a list of priests with credible sexual abuse allegations against children, the Catholic Jesuit West province released on Friday.

The priests served in the Diocese of Sacramento at Jesuit High School, St. Ignatius of Loyola Parish or St. Elizabeth Parish, Bishop Jaime Soto of the Sacramento Diocese said in a statement.

In October, the Sacramento Diocese announced that it had begun compiling a list of priests credibly accused of who served in the organization.

“We are compiling that list now, and have enlisted the help of an independent auditor respected for her work in protecting children and the vulnerable from abuse,” Soto said.

Dan McNevin, 59, was abused by a priest in the Oakland diocesed when he was a child, he said.

Now, he's an advocate with the Survivor's Network of those Abused by Priests, a national support network of more than 25,000 members who have been abused by clergy.

"A lot of people are devastated by this," McNevin said. "This is a rape of the soul, not just of the body. Because these priests are there spiritual conduits to heaven.”

New list released accuses 17 Catholic priests from St. Louis area of sexual abuse

ST. LOUIS (MO)
KMOV TV

December 8, 2018

By Marielle Mohs

A St. Louis based Jesuit province released a list of 42 Catholic priests and other ministry officials who are accused of sexual abuse. The list shows the allegations date back to 1955.

The Jesuits U.S. Central and Southern Province, which includes Missouri and Southern Illinois, released the list on their website Friday night.

The list shows that 17 of the 42 priests accused of sexual abuse by the province worked in the St. Louis area. According to the list, 12 of the 17 who worked in the St. Louis area worked at St. Louis University High School (SLUH).

The Jesuits says for each name listed there has been a credible claim of sexual abuse of a minor or a vulnerable adult. They make it clear that this list does not imply that the abuse allegations are true or that the accused individual has been found guilty of a crime.

In addition to the names on the list, the Jesuits have also provided the list of all the parishes, schools or Catholic hospitals they’ve worked at, the number of accusations of sexual abuse against them and the years the alleged abuse took place.

The list does not include photos of the accused priests, however. If they are still living, the list also does not provide their current location or place of work.

One of the St. Louis area priests listed is John “Jack” Campbell (1920-2009). The Jesuits say he has been credibly accused of sexually abusing 13 people, including a SLUH student back in the 1970s. The Jesuits say the Missouri Province of Jesuits paid a $185,000 settlement to that former student who now lives in Virginia and went public about his high school molestation after Campbell had already retired.

December 7, 2018

German prosecutors launch crackdown on church sex abuse

BOSTON (MA)
The Pilot

December 7, 2018

By Zita Ballinger Fletcher

German police and prosecutors are launching investigations into clergy sexual abuse following the Sept. 12 leak of a report containing evidence of 3,700 alleged child sex abuse cases in the Catholic Church over a 68-year-period.

Authorities in Cologne, Passau and Gorlitz have publicly initiated criminal proceedings following the release of the report, according to Welt news. Six law professors filed criminal complaints against all 27 dioceses in October. A further 20 public prosecutors nationwide are currently examining evidence against church officials in Germany's 27 Catholic dioceses.

According to a Dec. 6 report by the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, public prosecutors who have not yet openly brought charges are doing so with an aim to identify all parties involved in cover-ups and root out larger conspiracies within the church. Details of the investigations are being kept confidential. Authorities currently doing investigative research include those of Osnabruck, Wurzburg and Bamberg.

Archdioceses currently being affected by criminal proceedings have been asked to reveal all details of known cases and to hand over all relevant documents to government authorities.

The abuse cover-up scandal, which caused widespread shock in Germany, has also drawn attention from Germany's national government. On Nov. 22, the permanent council of the German bishops' conference announced it was cooperating with the federal government to take further steps following the release of the report, including the standardization of file management in all dioceses, establishing contacts for victims not affiliated with dioceses, and identifying, through an independent review, who exactly was responsible for institutional cover-ups.

Spokesmen for the German bishops' conference have declared its "full cooperation" with judicial authorities. Some archdioceses have already made their files available to public prosecutors, according to KNA, the German Catholic news agency.

Diocese of Charleston to release names of clergy credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors

CHARLESTON (SC)
Post And Courier.com

December 7, 2018

By Rickey Ciapha Dennis Jr.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston will release the names of priests in South Carolina credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors dating back to 1950, the diocese announced Friday. The names will be released by mid-February.

“We are committed to transparency,” Bishop Robert E. Guglielmone said in a statement. “Releasing the names of those credibly accused is another step in the healing process for all who have been harmed by priests.”

For decades, Catholic officials knew of the abuse but often preferred to reassign clergy to posts in other jurisdictions, protecting the church while putting additional children in harm’s way.

As early as 2002, the diocese had received allegations against 24 priests since the 1960s, 12 of whom were removed from the ministry.

Jesuits to Release Names of Abusive Clerics, SNAP Responds

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

December 6, 2018

According to reports, US Jesuit provinces will begin to release the names of proven, admitted and "credibly accused" child molesting clerics tomorrow.

We are glad that officials from the Jesuit order are taking this first step towards transparency. Releasing these names publicly not only helps survivors heal, but also encourages victims who may be suffering alone and in silence to come forward. These lists also expose men who may not have been previously identified as dangerous but who may be living and working in places that gives them access to children.

Still, the fact remains that this is a long-overdue move prompted only by pressure from prosecutors, parishioners and the public.

Archdiocese of Mobile Releases Names of Accused Priests

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

December 6 2018

Today, the Archdioceses of Mobile, AL released a list of 29 priests who have served in their diocese and been accused of child abuse. We are grateful for this development and urge further action.

Releasing these names publicly is crucial not only for the healing of survivors, but also to encourage victims who may be suffering in silence to come forward and to deter future clergy sex crimes and cover-ups. However, releasing these names is only the first step on the path towards healing and deterrence.

If Archbishop Thomas Rodi is confident in the accuracy of this list, we think he should reach out to Alabama’s attorney general and urge an outside, independent investigation into his diocese and other dioceses in the state. Only trained law enforcement professionals can truly judge when an accusation is credible or not and compel full transparency.

Archdiocese of Los Angeles Adds 54 Names to its List of Accused Priests

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

December 6, 2018

Today, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles updated their list of priests accused of sexual misconduct against children and vulnerable adults. We’re grateful that the Archdiocese has made these disclosures, but dismayed that reports of sexual violence continue to be handled in-house.

According to the Archdiocese, one reason they chose to release this update is because this new list “includes names that were not previously announced because the allegation was plausible but could not be corroborated.” They also admit that there are other persons in their Archdiocese who have been accused but whose names have been withheld because their oversight board could not corroborate the accusations. This is an excellent example of why we call for independent investigations by law enforcement. Bishops, priests, and other church staff are trained to be spiritual counselors, not criminal investigators. It should not be up to the diocese to determine when an allegation of abuse is credible; rather all allegations should be made to police so that professional investigators can do their job and investigate crimes.

New list of abusive Jesuit priests begs question: How many more are out there?

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

December 7, 2018

By Candy Woodall

Until Friday morning, Terry McKiernan had 178 Jesuit priests on a list of abusive clergy members in the U.S.

His list grew after the U.S. Central and Southern Province released the names of 42 Jesuit priests credibly accused of sexually abusing children.

The wholesale release of names of abusive priests has been trending among dioceses around the world since August, when a grand jury report identified 301 predator priests in Pennsylvania. Friday marked the first time a Jesuit order named their abusers in a long list.

While the Catholic priest abuse scandal might seem more transparent than ever, McKiernan said we know fewer than half of all abusive priests by name.

Charleston diocese to name clergy accused of sex abuse

CHARLESTON (SC)
WCIV TV

December 7, 2018

The Catholic Diocese of Charleston is preparing to release the names of its clergy "credibly accused" of sexually abusing minors, a spokesperson said Friday.

Bishop Robert Guglielmone plans to release the list of names no later than mid-February, diocese media relations director Maria Aselage said in a news release Friday.

The list will span decades, to include "all priests" from the diocese accused of sex crimes against minors dating back to 1950, per Aselage.

"The Diocese is currently in the process of reviewing its priest personnel files from 2007 through today," Friday's release says. "Once the current review is complete, the list will be released."

The diocese already has such files largely compiled, as they were collected during a detailed review of Diocesan priest personnel and other relevant files in 2007 as part of a class action lawsuit settlement agreement, Aselage says.

Law enforcement officials are already privy to the contents of the files, per Aselage.

Jesuits West Releases Names of Jesuits Credibly Accused of Sexual Abuse of a Minor or Vulnerable Adult Since 1950

PORTLAND (OR)
Jesuits, Western Region

December 7, 2018

Dear Friends in the Lord:
Today, Jesuits West Province releases the names of priests and brothers who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors since 1950. We do so because the People of God demand and deserve transparency. We do so because we hope that this act of accountability will help victims and their families in the healing process. We do so because while the vast majority of Jesuits of our province are not on this list, it is important that parents not wonder whether their children are safe in a church, in a school or in any other setting where a Jesuit may be present.

On behalf of the Society of Jesus, I apologize to the victims and families who put their trust in a Jesuit, only to have that trust so profoundly betrayed. It is inconceivable that someone entrusted with the pastoral care of a child could be capable of something so harmful. Yet, tragically, this is a part of our Jesuit history, a legacy we cannot ignore.

Thankfully, sixteen years after shocking cases of clergy sexual abuse were brought to light in Boston in 2002, there has been significant reform in how the Church and religious orders like ours handle allegations of sexual abuse. Jesuits West has both a zero-tolerance policy for credible allegations made against a Jesuit involving a minor or a vulnerable adult and stringent procedures to ensure the safety of minors. No Jesuit who has a credible allegation of sexually abusing a minor is allowed to remain in public ministry. The majority of the cases related to the names that we release today date back decades. While even one case is abhorrent, it is consoling to know that the safeguards we have put in place are helping to create safe environments for everyone.

More priests accused of sexually abusing children served in Alabama

BIRMINGHAM (AL)
AL.com

December 7, 2018

By Christopher Harress

Eight Catholic priests who served at Spring Hill College in Mobile have been named as part of a list Friday that accuses former Jesuits of sexually abusing children.

The list of 42 comes one day after the Archdiocese of Mobile named 29 former priests and clergy who had similar accusation of sexual child abuse made against them.

Fr. Ronald Mercier, the leader of the Central Southern organization, said in a letter that the names represented a “sinful part of history.”

He added: “Words cannot possibly suffice to express our sorrow and shame for what occurred, our promise of prayers for healing, and our commitment to work with them. Caring for these survivors – and preventing any such future events – must be our focus as we move forward.”

Vatican Launches Investigation After Chilean Nuns Report Sex Abuse by Priests

ROME (ITALY)
Associated Press

December 7, 2018

The Vatican has launched an investigation into a small Chilean religious order of nuns after some sisters denounced sexual abuse at the hands of priests and mistreatment by their superiors, a turning point that shows the Holy See is now willing to investigate allegations of sexual violence against nuns.

The scandal at the Institute of the Good Samaritan was revealed publicly in an investigative report by Chilean national television earlier this year at the height of outrage over how Chilean Catholic hierarchy covered up decades of sexual abuse of children by priests.

In the report, a half-dozen current and former nuns said sisters were thrown out of the order after they denounced the abuse to their superiors. The report followed the sisters as they testified before two Vatican investigators sent to Chile by Pope Francis to get to the bottom of the church-wide scandal there.

In a statement, the Vatican embassy to Chile announced that an “apostolic visitation,” or investigation, had begun Wednesday in the institute. It said over the coming months the probe would take testimony from current and former sisters and those affiliated with the institute so the Vatican can understand the situation and make whatever changes are necessary.

The institute is located in the diocese of Talca, which since 1996 had been headed by Bishop Horacio del Carmen Valenzuela Abarca. Pope Francis removed Valenzuela as bishop in June as part of his cleanup of the Chilean hierarchy. Valenzuela had been one of the bishops trained by Chile’s most infamous predator priests, the Rev. Fernando Karadima.

Catholic priests with KC connections on Jesuits' list of accused sex abusers

KANSAS CITY (MO)
KMBC TV

December 7, 2018

The Jesuits U.S. Central and Southern Province released a list of names of Jesuit priests and brothers with credible allegations of sexual abuse involving minors.

Six on the list had pastoral connections at some point in their ministry to either Rockhurst High School or Rockhurst University.

They include:
Burton J. Fraser, SJ, was ordained in 1935 and died in 1971. Of his eight pastoral assignments, one was at Rockhurst High School. The Jesuits estimated the time frame of abuse happened in the 1950s. Fraser had died by the time the allegation was received.

Francis J. Kegal, SJ, had a pastoral assignment at Rockhurst High School and St. Louis University High School in St. Louis. The Jesuits estimated the time frame of abuse happened in the 1940s, and Kegel had left the Society of Jesus when the allegation was received. He died in 2009.

Paul C. Pilgram, SJ, who was ordained in 1970, spent time at Rockhurst High School in his six pastoral assignments. The Jesuits estimate the suspected abuse happened from the 1970s to the 1990s. Pilgram's ministry with minors was restricted in 1991. He was removed from the ministry in 2003.

Chester E. Gaiter, SJ, who was ordained in 1976, had six pastoral assignments, including Rockhurst High School. The Jesuits said the alleged abuse happened between the 1970s and 1980s. Gaiter was ill at the time of the allegations and died in 2010.

Philip D. Kraus, SJ, was ordained in 1975, and was suspected of abuse in the 1970s. Kraus had pastoral assignments at St. Francis Xavier parish and Rockhurst University. The Jesuits said Kraus' ministry with minors was restricted in 1996 and he was removed from the ministry in 2003 and lives under supervision.

Diocese of Cheyenne to release list of all clergymen credibly accused of sexual abuse since 1950

CASPER (WY)
Casper Star-Tribune

December 7, 2018

By Seth Klamann

The Diocese of Cheyenne is compiling a list of priests, bishops and deacons who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse since 1950, Bishop Steven Biegler announced this week, signaling that the Wyoming diocese is joining a wave of public self-examinations by dioceses across the country.

"The Diocese should have a current master list so it can be confident that it has applied the current standards to all living credibly accused offenders -- and especially the standards of zero tolerance -- in all situations," Biegler wrote in a column in the December issue of the Wyoming Catholic Register. He added the review will also examine how the six bishops who have served since 1950 -- himself included -- handled the allegations.

The diocese previously conducted a review in 2002 -- the same year that former Bishop Joseph Hart was cleared of abuse allegations by the Natrona County District Attorney's Office -- of clergymen who were working in it at the time. That review "verified that no priest with a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor was serving in the public ministry in any way in the Diocese of Cheyenne," Biegler wrote.

This latest examination comes as dioceses across the country conduct sweeping reviews of their own troubled histories with clerical sexual abuse. On Thursday, the church named 29 men accused of abuse in southern Alabama, allegations that dated back to 1950. In November, a diocese in Missouri named 33 priests and religious brothers who had been credibly accused. In August, a grand jury in Pennsylvania wrote that more than 300 Catholic priests had molested more than 1,000 children for decades.

The work on this latest review began after mid-September, when the Star-Tribune requested information regarding all credibly accused priests, all settlements and the amount paid in these agreements dating back to 1950, said Rev. Carl Gallinger, the diocese's vicar general. He said the "commitment" to conducting the review predated the newspaper's request. He said he had no time estimate on when the review, which will be conducted by an "independent law firm," would be completed.

Biegler was unavailable to comment Thursday. It's unclear how much detail will be in the list.

FBI engaged in wide-ranging probe of clergy sex abuse in Buffalo Diocese

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

December 7, 2018

By Jay Tokasz and Dan Herbeck

Mark Lynch says he was molested by a priest when he was 13. The abuse happened 50 years ago, well beyond when a sex crime could be prosecuted.

But the FBI wanted to know more, anyway.

Lynch said two federal agents visited him at his Youngstown home about a month ago, armed with questions about the abuse and the Buffalo Diocese's response to his allegations against the Rev. Joseph Schuster.

“We sat at my kitchen table for about an hour, and I told them what happened. They were very thorough and already had a file on me. They had done their homework,” said Lynch. “They asked a lot of questions about who I spoke to, who I reported the incident to at the diocese. They told me they hope to talk with everyone who has come forward with a complaint.”

Federal authorities have fanned out across Western New York to learn more about a clergy abuse scandal that until now largely has been ignored by law enforcement.

“They’re really looking for proof of a cover-up,” said Nicole Delisio Wright, an advocate for victims of clergy abuse. “Any type of proof that there’s a widespread cover-up.”

The aggressive federal interest is happening in other parts of the country, as well.

Jesuits release preliminary list of members credibly accused of sex abuse

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
Times-Picayune

December 7, 2018

By Kim Chatelain

The Jesuit religious order on Friday (Dec. 7) released the names of 42 priests, brothers and scholastics who are credibly accused of sexual abuse over the past several decades, supplementing a list of 57 similarly accused Roman Catholic clergymen named by the Archdiocese of New Orleans last month.

The new list includes six clergymen who were included in a list of credibly accused men of the cloth released by the Archdiocese of New Orleans last month. There are 13 Jesuits with ties to Louisiana who were not previously named.

Those named Friday were members of the U.S. Central and Southern Province and its predecessor entities: the New Orleans Province, the Missouri Province, or the Independent Region of Puerto Rico of the Society of Jesus.

Bishop: Church’s Reform Requires Authentic Synodality With Laity

IRONDALE (AL)
National Catholic Register

December. 7, 2018

By Peter Jesserer Smith

According to Bishop Shawn McKnight, reforming the Church demands both “authentic communion” and a “genuine synodal process” that involves the laity at all levels.

The shepherd of the Diocese of Jefferson City, Missouri, made this argument in an open letter to his flock following the U.S. bishops’ general assembly in Baltimore last month, telling them the U.S. Catholic bishops as a group had shown themselves there as “too insular” and “ineffectual” at addressing the abuse of power by bishops.

And, Bishop McKnight said, the presence and participation in Baltimore of retired bishops who were notorious for covering up clerical sexual abuse demonstrated “episcopal arrogance and clericalism” and was “a slap in the face to all who have been wounded by the clergy.”

Bishop McKnight’s blunt letter echoed the earlier call of the Missouri bishops to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops: that the laity needed to be incorporated in a reform of the Church’s pastoral governance at all levels.

In this Dec. 4 interview with the Register, Bishop McKnight explains why he thinks the bishops need to move in this direction, why Archbishop Theodore McCarrick’s rise to power must be fully investigated and exposed, and how engaging the gifts of the laity at all levels could help to heal the divisions between shepherds and their flocks.

You just came back from the U.S. bishops’ assembly: What happened that made you write recently that the bishops’ conference needs authentic collegiality and a genuine synodal process?

After conducting a series of listening sessions with the faithful of the diocese in preparation for the bishops’ assembly in Baltimore, I thought it was important to report back to them on the outcome of the meeting with regard to the clergy sexual-abuse scandal.

Maryalice Demler responds after comments at Catholic forum strike a nerve

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

December 7, 2018

By Alan Pergament

At a Catholic church forum Monday designed to move forward from the sexual abuse crisis in the Buffalo Diocese, WGRZ-TV (Channel 2) anchor Maryalice Demler ended up upsetting some in attendance who interpreted her remarks as an unprofessional critique of a competing TV station.

Multiple people came away from the panel at St. Joseph University Church near the University at Buffalo campus on Main Street calling Demler “unprofessional” in what they termed her “insinuations” about the way whistle-blower Siobhan O’Connor and WKBW-TV (Channel 7) and reporter Charlie Specht handled the story – without mentioning the two by name.

In an email response, Demler said her remarks were misrepresented by those offended and that she has the support of another panelist.

Polish Church urged to check sex abuse claims against priest

WARSAW, POLAND
Associated Press

December 7, 2018

By Czarek Sololowski

The mayor of the Polish city of Gdansk has asked the local Roman Catholic archbishop to investigate allegations that a now-deceased priest who rose to prominence in the Solidarity pro-democracy movement sexually abused minors.

The allegations against the late Mgr. Henryk Jankowski surfaced this week when Barbara Borowiecka told the "Duzy Format" magazine and TVN24 television he abused her and others when she was a girl and his parishioner in the 1970s, before his pro-Solidarity activity.

Another woman — who did not show her face — also told TVN24 that Jankowski touched her inappropriately when she was only six.

DIGITAL EXTRA: News 5 Investigates where accused priests served

MOBILE (AL)
WKRG TV

December 6, 2018

By Chris Best

The Archdiocese of Mobile released the names of 28 clergy members who have been "credibly accused" of child sex allegations since 1950. News 5 Investigators are mapping out their service, where they served, and when the abuse allegations occurred. We've discovered some disturbing trends just based on the minimal information provided by the archdiocese. Several of the 28 priests or deacons served at several different locations. The Catholic church has faced harsh criticism in the past for moving pedophile priests from parish to parish or school. Several parishes or schools have the multiple accused clergy. Some of clergy served at several of the the same parishes or schools. And the allegations against them overlap in time period as well.

For example, three who served at McGill-Toolen also served at Little Flower Parish. Allegations against Vernon Dahmen span from the mid '70s to the early 80s. At the Same time from the 1960s to 1982 Arthur Schrenger is accused of sexual misconduct with minors. He also served at McGill-Toolen and Little Flower.

Patrick Nicolson was accused in 1976, and again served at McGill-Toolen and Little Flower.

News 5 Investigators mapped out other connections, watch the video for more. And click here for the entire list and complete letter from the Archbishop. We'll also have LIVE team coverage on News 5 at 5 and 6.

Pedophile US priest arrested in the Philippines had child rape den

PHILIPPINES
Preston Business Review

December 7, 2018

Pedophile US priest arrested in the Philippines had child rape den A Catholic priest arrested and charged with sexual abuse of children during his longtime residency in the Philippines lived with numerous underage boys, prosecutors say.

The US and the Philippines announced the arrest of Rev. Kenneth Hendricks, 77, on charges of engaging in illicit sexual conduct in foreign places, a federal crime that could result in up to 30 years in prison. The Catholic priest had been residing in the Philippines for almost 40 years, receiving some funding for missionary work from the Archdiocese of Cincinnati.

This case is sadly far from isolated in the majority Catholic Philippines. In 2002, the Catholic Bishops‘ Conference of the Philippines’ President Orlando Quevedo estimated that in the course of last 20 years, some 200 of the 7,000 priests in the country may have been involved in illicit sexual activity.

Many disturbing details came to light during the investigation, such as the prosecutor’s claim that Hendricks had multiple children living at his residence: “It is alleged he insisted they take baths together and would molest the victims alone or with other boys. The priest allegedly warned the victims that if they told anyone they would all go to prison.”

US attorney Benjamin Glassman described Hendrick’s actions as “horrifying… abusive conduct,” adding that Hendricks’ first “befriended” his victims, and found excuses to get them to come to his private residence before “engaging in progressively intimate , sometimes including oral and anal sex.”

The age of those abused ranges between 7 and 12 years old. Some of them were abused multiple times over extended periods. All of those Hendricks assaulted met him through his official work in the church; many of them when they signed up to be altar boys.

The investigation was initiated after some victims filed complaints with the police. Those that came forward had consistent elements which helped police verify the claims and find more victims. Prosecutors also have access to a recording of a conversation between Hendricks and one of his victims, in which he discusses reaching a settlement with his victims’ parents and resigning if found out. In one of the stomach churning recordings he is heard lamenting that “Happy days are gone” and that “It’s all over,” according to the criminal complaint.

Mike Schafer, a representative of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, said that they “know next to nothing about this man,” with the Diocese on their website that Hendricks “is not, nor ever has been, a priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati” next to his listing as one of the church’s missionaries in Asia.

Statistical analysis seeks context for Pa. grand jury report

PHILADELPHIA (PA)
CNA/EWTN News

December 6, 2018

A new statistical analysis seeks to contextualize data about child sexual abuse by Catholic clergy in Pennsylvania, four months after a grand jury report detailed hundreds of abuse allegations in six of the state’s diocese, spanning nearly eight decades.

To “properly understand the import” of the grand jury’s findings, the statistical analysis compares the number of abuse allegations to other institutions during similar time periods, and seeks to better understand when most of the cases of alleged abuse took place.

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia commissioned the analysis, which was conducted by the law firm Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP.

The 884-page grand jury report, released Aug. 14, was written by 23 grand jurors who spent 18 months investigating the six dioceses with the help of the FBI, examining half a million pages of documents in the process. The six diocese are Allentown, Erie, Greensburg, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh, and Scranton.

Bishop Zubik holds final listening session over ‘predator priest' report

PITTSBURGH (PA)
WPXI TV News

December 7, 2018

Pittsburgh Bishop David Zubik held his final listening session Thursday night to listen to the concerns of survivors and parishioners after the grand jury report on “predator priests” in several Pennsylvania Catholic dioceses.

Thursday night’s listening session, the last of four planned sessions, was held at Saint Ferdinand Church.

“For any healing to take place there has to be an opening of the wound,” Zubik said as he addressed questions and criticism from those in attendance.

Several people spoke out about their concerns over sex abuse in the church and how it has been handled.

People Channel 11 News spoke with said there appears to be progress.

Zubik said changes are being discussed, but they will take time. His goal is to have an action plan created by Ash Wednesday, March 6, although it could come sooner.

The listening sessions are a direct response to the grand jury report, which outlined more than 1,000 cases dating back several decades.

Survivors and parishioners have trouble understanding why and how the abuse went on for so long.

“If you call yourself a man of God, and you're supposed to care about your flock … I don't get it sometimes,” Ryan O'Connor, a survivor of abuse, said.

Victim of priest abuse reflects on Archdiocese of Mobile accused abuser list

BIRMINGHAM (AL)
WVTM News

December 6, 2018

By Mary O'Connell

Danny Molloy grew up in Boston and served as an altar boy at church. He says while serving, a priest molested him.

Clergy sex abuse: why the SBC’s ‘studying it’ response isn’t enough

WINSTON-SALEM (NC)
Baptist News Global

December 7, 2018

By Christa Brown

Since last July when Southern Baptist Convention president J.D. Greear announced the formation of a sexual abuse study group, people have been asking me, “Do you think they’ll finally change things?”

Often, I hear a note of hopefulness in the question and remember when I too might have believed that such an announcement meant Baptist officials were rising to the task of addressing clergy sex abuse. Not anymore. After 12 years of hearing the stories of survivors of Baptist clergy abuse, I’ve learned that, on this subject, the words of Baptist leaders are worthy of wariness.

SBC officials say they’re “studying it.” So what?

First, let’s remember that SBC officials have sung this “studying it” song before. Their prior 2008 “study,” with its seemingly predisposed do-nothing result, left many of us Baptist abuse survivors with a healthy measure of skepticism.

“But this is a new generation of Baptist leaders,” people say, and true enough, there are some younger faces. However, this is not a problem of old-guard versus new-guard.

“Decades of institutional patterns will not be changed by simply repopulating the same inadequate structures with new faces, no matter how well-intentioned they may be.”

The problem is that the SBC system fosters a climate for abuse and cover-ups because it lacks effective structures for clergy accountability and for information-sharing among congregations. Decades of institutional patterns will not be changed by simply repopulating the same inadequate structures with new faces, no matter how well-intentioned they may be.

Second, it’s not even clear exactly what SBC officials are “studying” this time around. The details of their process are not transparent, and some of their remarks provide little reason for confidence. It’s hard to imagine that these leaders will be able to remediate effectively their own institutional failures when, so often, they avoid even speaking of them. For example, Executive Committee chairman Mike Stone claimed there had “never” been any “hesitancy about addressing these issues” in the SBC, and said it was engaging the study because of the increased emphasis on sexual abuse “in the culture and in the media.” Executive Committee interim president Augie Boto talked about the study as a way “to address evil, human failure and the consequences of sin.”

Long Beach Priest Among 54 Abusers Identified By Archdiocese

LOS ANGELES (CA)
Patch

December 6, 2018

By Paige Austin

The Archdiocese of Los Angeles Thursday released the names of dozens of local priests accused of abusing children, a move likely to stir up trauma and catharsis across LA parishes. The list includes 54 priests, most of whom are dead or defrocked, included 30 who had not be publicly identified before.

Most of the abuse took place decades ago but only came to light in the last decade. Twenty-seven of the priests were identified well after hey were dead. The announcement is a move designed to increase trust and transparency. It's the first time the archdiocese has publicly updated its list of abusers in a decade, when the archdiocese agreed to a $660 million settlement with 508 victims.

The list does not identify the parish where the priest ministered.

"To every one of you who has suffered abuse by the hand of a priest, I am truly sorry. Nothing can undo the violence done to you or restore the innocence or trust that was taken from you," Archbishop Jose Gomez said at a news conference at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in downtown Los Angeles. "I am humbled by your courage and ashamed at how the church has let you down."

According to the list, only three priests in the county have been accused of abusing children within the past decade. Two were investigated, removed from the ministry and referred to law enforcement while a third one left the country. According to the church, the archdiocese has publicly identified all living priests accused of abuse since 2008 in announcements to the communities where they served. But on Thursday, they decided to release the names of deceased priests that were accused in the last decade as well as "plausible" accusations, in an effort toward transparency. The plausible" allegations could not be investigated because the priest had died or had long ago left the archdiocese. However, authorities determined the accusation matched up with the priest's time of service and place of ministry.

Catholic parishioners calling on Pope Francis to end sex abuse for good

BIRMINGHAM (AL)
ABC 33 News

December 6, 2018

by Jennifer Gonsoulin

Right now-- new insight into what the Roman Catholic Church calls credible accusations of sexual misconduct in Alabama involving nearly 30 priests, deacons, and other men. Two of them had ties to Birmingham: Joseph Gill, who had pastoral assignments here in the 1960s; and Edward Lawler, in the 1970s. Both men are now dead.

Local parishioners are reacting strongly about the revelations and the Archbishop's plea for forgiveness.

"This sex scandal is one of the worst to ever hit the church," says Randall Terry.

"They should be separated and exposed for what they are," Kathy O'Connor agrees. "It happens to everybody else. They're not above the law."

They are two people of the Catholic faith calling out leaders for hiding years of what is described as "crimes against children" in Alabama.

"It's been horrible! The cover-up!" says Terry. "Some of these cover-ups are borderline criminal."

Randall Terry says the Archdiocese of Mobile was right to expose the names. The list -- detailing names, dates of misconduct, and the parishes where they served. The Archdiocese says the decision to release the names was not made lightly. The letter, stating "It is my prayer that this will not re-traumatize anyone, but will assist in the healing for which victims desperately long."

Terry -- also calling on Pope Francis to take the appropriate action and deal with sex abuse for good.

Jesuit West Province to release priest abuse report Friday

PHOENIX (AZ)
NBC Channel 12

December 6, 2018

By Joe Dana

Tomorrow, faculty and staff at Brophy College Preparatory in Phoenix and 70 other Jesuit high schools and colleges throughout the west will likely pay close attention to what is revealed in a new report on priest abuse.

Jesuit West is a religious order of the Catholic Church that oversees Jesuit high schools and universities.

“While this is a necessary part of the healing process and reconciliation, I think what you will see with this list is the majority are cases dating back decades,” said Tracey Primrose, Director of Communications for Jesuits West Province. “There is no one who has a credible claim who is working actively in ministry in the Jesuits.”

Some of the men named in the report are deceased and did not have a chance to defend themselves against the accusations. But, the claims against those men have been evaluated and substantiated by the Jesuit West review board, Primrose said.

“This is us, on our own, deciding to do something transparent to be accountable," Primrose said. "Some of those names will have already been out there.”

Attorneys, Activists Demand More Data on Priest Sexual Misconduct

LOS ANGELES (CA)
City News Service

December 6, 2018

Attorneys, Activists Demand More Data on Priest Sexual Misconduct

A Camarillo man is suing multiple Roman Catholic dioceses throughout the state, claiming he was abused by a priest as a boy.

The group alleges there has been widespread covering up of sexual abuse misconduct among clergy in Orange County for years.

They called on Diocese of Orange Bishop Kevin Vann to release the names of all clergy accused of sexual misconduct.

A Camarillo man, who is suing multiple Roman Catholic dioceses throughout the state and who claims he was abused by a priest in Anaheim as a boy, Thursday joined attorneys and other clergy abuse activists to call on the Diocese of Orange to release "secret" files on priests accused of misconduct.

At a news conference at a hotel in Orange Thursday morning, the group alleged there has been widespread covering up of sexual abuse misconduct among clergy in Orange County for years.

LA Archdiocese releases 54 new names of priests accused of sex abuse

LOS ANGELES (CA)
KABC TV

December 7, 2018

Archbishop Jose Gomez of the Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles has released an updated list of the names of priests accused of sexually abusing minors.

This is the first update since 2008.

The list now has an additional 54 priests, added because the criteria has changed. The list already held almost 300 names of priests directly or indirectly associated with the Archdiocese who had been accused of abuse. Of those on the list, 120 are now deceased and six were exonerated.

"To every one of you who has suffered abuse at the hand of a priest, I am truly sorry," Gomez said. "I am humbled by your courage and ashamed at how the church has let you down."

The church says the names were added if there was "a single plausible report of sexual misconduct against the priest which could not be confirmed since the priest died or left the archdiocese long before the allegation was received."

Since the 2008 report, three priests accused of abusing children were removed from the priesthood.

Records show priest accused of sexual abuse worked in Cincinnati as 'Brother Pius'

CINCINNATI (OH)
WKRC TV

December 6, 2018

By Walter Smith-Randolph

Fr. Kenneth Hendricks, a priest from Cincinnati, is now accused of molesting 10 boys while living and working in the Philippines, but American investigators believe there may be more victims of Hendricks.

Hendricks has been working in the Phillippines for 37 years, but investigators say he would visit Cincinnati in the summers. Local 12 has found archived newspapers that say Hendricks worked at St. Francis Seraph Church in Over-the-Rhine and was known as Brother Pius Hendricks.

“Given what we know, we believe thus far that there's a high possibility that other children may have been impacted by his alleged actions,” said Special Agent Steve Francis with the Department of Homeland Security.

A spokeswoman for the Franciscan order confirms Hendricks took his vows in 1962 in Cincinnati but left the order in 1986. That's when Hendricks went to the Phillipines and was ordained a priest.

Sacramento Diocese removes priest accused of sex abuse

SACRAMENTO (CA)
KCRA TV

December 6, 2018

By Vicki Gonzalez

The Diocese of Sacramento is taking action following two new claims of sex abuse against two former priests.

The man who came forward said the assaults took place at Camp Pendola and Holy Family Catholic Church in Citrus Heights in 1985. He said he wants to be identified as John Doe.

The alleged abuse took place when he was 17 years old while on a camp work trip with former director of Camp Pendola, Monsignor Murrough Wallace.

Wallace is now retired.

“In light of the allegation raised (Thursday) by Mr. Doe, Bishop Soto has directed Msgr. Murrough Wallace, retired pastor of St. Theresa Parish in South Lake Tahoe, to withdraw from ministry until more facts can be gathered,” Fr. Michael Vaughan said in a statement.

KCRA was able to reach Wallace on the phone about the sex abuse allegations. He did not want to comment.

A couple years ago, John Doe said after years of counseling he was able to confront Wallace about what happened.

“I went on to tell the details of what he did, and as I finished telling my details, he was crying and he apologized,” he said. "I am asking him to come forward and tell the truth and help those suffering in silence."

The second sex abuse allegation involves a former monsignor at Holy Family Catholic Church in Citrus Heights. The priest has since died.

The diocese did not acknowledge the second priest in their statement.

"I have come to know two additional victims. One of each priest, both male," John Doe said. "I am coming forward and telling my story as John Doe because all of my family doesn't know."

His attorney, Joseph George, said there is not a lawsuit due to the statute of limitations. But, his client chose to move forward after the diocese announced they are delaying the public release of each accused priest until next year.

December 6, 2018

Jesuit High president warns order's list of suspected sex abusers will reveal new names

NEW ORLEANS (A)
The Advocate

December 6, 2018

By Ramon Antonio Vargas

One day before the Jesuit religious order’s regional leaders identify priests and other members of the order suspected of sexually abusing minors, the president of New Orleans’ Jesuit High School on Thursday warned his colleagues that the list will contain some names that have not been previously publicized.

The Rev. Christopher Fronk’s alert came in an email to faculty and staff of the venerable Mid-City school that acknowledged “a lot of pain, anger, embarrassment and sadness surrounding this chapter of our … past.”

But Fronk’s message asked employees to refrain from assuming that “because a Jesuit worked here at some point that the allegation against him involves Jesuit High School.”

The list from the Jesuits will cover priests, brothers and men studying to become priests while teaching locally who worked in the region in 1955 or after and were the subject of abuse allegations that officials consider credible. But the allegations could stem from postings in other jurisdictions.

Provided by the Jesuits’ U.S. Central and Southern Province, it will follow a similar list published last month by New Orleans Archbishop Gregory Aymond, which identified 57 Catholic priests and deacons who allegedly abused minors over the last several decades. That list, which was published Nov. 2, included six Jesuit priests, but did not include religious brothers and other members of the order.

Both Aymond and the regional province’s leader, the Rev. Ronald Mercier, say the lists are part of an attempt to earn back the trust of parishioners following the latest aftershocks of a sex abuse and cover-up scandal that was first spotlighted in Boston in 2002. The scandal has flared up again in earnest this year, sparked by a Pennsylvania grand jury report that exposed numerous previously unreported sexual abuse allegations involving hundreds of priests.

DA urges victims of priest abuse to come forward, so she can prosecute

MOBILE (AL)
WKRG TV

December 6, 2018

By Chris Best

Mobile County District Attorney Ashley Rich is urging victims of priest and clergy abuse to come forward so she can prosecute. The Archdiocese of Mobile Thursday released the names of 29 priests and deacons who have been "credibly accused" since 1950. Although of them are now dead, several are not. Rich says victims must come forward and ask her office to prosecute. She's also asking anyone with evidence to come forward. Rich says there's no statute of limitations on any sex offense if the victim is under 16, regardless if it involves force or serious injury.

The sexual misconduct allegations range from 1950 up until at least 2012.

Advocates say 72 priests in Orange County abused kids

ORANGE (CA)
Associated Press

December 6, 2018

Advocates for survivors of child sex abuse say they have compiled a list of 72 priests who served in the Southern California Diocese of Orange and who are accused of abusing kids.

Lawyer Mike Reck on Thursday said that's many more than those reported by the Diocese and demanded greater transparency.

He says the list was compiled with publicly available information including criminal cases, lawsuits and press statements.

dvocates have issued similar reports in other jurisdictions in a push to hold church officials accountable for child sex abuse cases.

The Diocese of Orange says the lawyers are trying to re-litigate old claims and that the church takes any accusations of abuse "extraordinarily seriously."

Diocese officials issued a report in 2016 saying 14 clergy accused of abuse were removed from min
California United States North America

Lawyer on trial for revealing confidential Delbarton sex abuse settlement

MORRISTOWN (NJ)
Morristown Daily Record

December 6, 2018

By Peggy Wright

A civil trial that stems from a six-year-old lawsuit brought by Delbarton School against an attorney involving a confidential 1988 sex abuse settlement began Wednesday in Morris County.

The jury heard testimony from Gregory Gianforcaro, the attorney who represented a former student, who in 1984 claimed he had been abused by Rev. Timothy Brennan.

Gianforcaro is being sued by The Order of St. Benedict, which runs the school, for allegedly disclosing in 2012 the confidential settlement sum reached with the student in 1988.

While trying to get a gag order lifted in the case in 2012, Gianforcaro said, at a news conference, the settlement between former student William Wolfe and the school had been about seven figures. The Order alleges the attorney at that time violated the confidentiality agreement.

The suit also alleges Gianforcaro committed a breach of duty of good faith and fair dealing. Delbarton attorneys Christopher Kinum and Robert Gold want the jury of six men and two women to award damages that equal Wolfe's 30-year-old settlement, which has never been precisely disclosed.

Catholic school sex-abuse confidentiality case is resolved

NEWARK (NJ)
Associated Press

December 6, 2018

By David Porter

A lawsuit filed by a Catholic school against an attorney it claimed breached a confidentiality clause in a clergy sex abuse settlement has been resolved, both sides said Thursday.

Neither side offered details on the resolution.

It brings an end to a six-year battle among the Order of St. Benedict of New Jersey, the private Delbarton School and Gregory Gianforcaro, an attorney who has represented numerous clergy sex abuse victims.

The suit claimed Gianforcaro violated a confidentiality clause in a former Delbarton student's 1988 settlement with the school when the lawyer told reporters in 2012 that the settlement was "approximately seven figures."

At the time, Gianforcaro was seeking to have the confidentiality clause lifted, and it eventually was. Gianforcaro denied violating the agreement because, among other factors, he was not representing the former student in 1988 when it was signed.

Archdiocese of Los Angeles reveals list of 54 clergy it says abused children

LOS ANGELES (CA)
Los Angeles Times

December 6, 2018

By Laura Newberry

For the first time in a decade, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles on Thursday updated its list of clergy accused of molesting children, addressing renewed outcry about how the Catholic Church responds to abuse allegations.

“We owe it to the victim-survivors to be fully transparent in listing the names of those who perpetrate this abuse,” Archbishop Jose H. Gomez said in a statement in releasing the list of 54 names.

The decision to disclose names of accused clergy has been made by bishops across the United States after the release in August of a Pennsylvania report, which revealed a decades-long cover-up of child sex abuse involving more than 1,000 victims and hundreds of priests. Dioceses in San Diego, San Jose, Orange County and San Bernardino have also released names of accused clergy this year.

In 2006, a Los Angeles Times analysis found that the Archdiocese of Los Angeles partially or completely omitted 11 known cases of clerical abuse from its “Report to the People of God.” This was after then-Archbishop Roger Mahony said the report provided the “fullest possible disclosure” of how the church responded to sex abuse allegations.

The report reveals two cases of alleged abuse of minors reported in the jurisdiction since 2008, when the list was last updated. Those accused priests, Juan Cano and Jose Luis Cuevas, have since been investigated by law enforcement and removed from the ministry, according to the archdiocese. Cuevas was charged with groping a girl in Long Beach. He later pleaded no contest to sexual assault charges. Cano is under investigation by the Los Angeles Police Department.

In all, 54 names were added to the archdiocese’s “Report to the People of God,” originally published in 2004. Most of those names belong to clergy who allegedly committed abuse before 2008 and had already been publicly accused. Twenty-seven are dead.

Archdiocese of Los Angeles’ Disclosure: Statement from Jeff Anderson & Associates

LOS ANGELES (CA)
Law office of Jeff Anderson

December 6, 2018

In response to pressure from the public, survivors, the lawsuit filed by Tom Emens in October 2018, and a report exposing 307 clergy offenders released by Jeff Anderson & Associates, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles has updated its list of credibly or publicly accused clergy after 10 years. This is a positive step in the right direction for the Archdiocese.

However, the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and its officials have repeatedly shown that they cannot be trusted to self-report without oversight. The next step is the public disclosure of documents regarding the histories of these offenders and the identities of Church officials who were complicit in the cover-up of these crimes. This can only be accomplished by requiring the Archdiocese release this information to law enforcement and trained third parties to verify that it is complete and accurate. Until this information is released, the Archdiocese’s efforts remain a half-truth.

Now the survivors who have been waiting for acknowledgement of their perpetrator’s identity can take steps toward healing and accountability. Thank you to every survivor who has come forward to share their truth to make our communities safer for children.

The report naming 307 offenders and the complaint filed by Tom Emens can be found at www.andersonadvocates.com.

He’s never spoken out publicly before

SACRAMMENTO (CA)
Law office of Joseph C. George

December 6, 2018

He’s “outing” two accused priests for the 1st time
One worked at Sacramento Cathedral and the other predator headed youth camp for 20 years
Victim is upset by local diocese’s “recklessness & secrecy”

WHAT:
At a news conference, a survivor of clergy childhood sexual abuse (who will be identified as John Doe) will disclose the sexual abuse he suffered as a child at the hands of two Sacramento priests who have never been publicly identified as credibly accused perpetrators: Msgr. Murrough Wallace and Msgr. Vito Francis Mistretta. Bishop Quinn and Bishop Weigand knew that Msgr. Mistretta sexually abused a minor and never warned parents.

John Doe is frustrated by Bishop Soto’s delay in publicizing the list of predators and wants to alert other victims of these two priests that they are not alone and need not suffer in silence. There are resources for victims of clergy sexual abuse to get help. The church’s current system to “help” survivors is inadequate and shameful.

WHERE:
Law Offices of Joseph C. George, Ph.D., 601 University Avenue, Suite 230, Sacramento, CA

Report to the People of God List of Priests Accused of Sexual Misconduct with Minors 2018 Update

LOS ANGELES (A)
Los Angeles Archdiocese

December 6, 2018

Below is the 2018 Update which supplements the 2004 Report to the People of God. The status of those listed in the 2004 Report, as amended through 2008, is also being reissued to show their current status . The 2018 Update includes priests accused since 2008. We recommend that you read the introduction page and FAQs below before exploring the lists.

The names of living priests in the 2018 Update include instances where the allegations were found to be credible. The names of those who were in ministry at the time of the accusation have previously been made public through announcements at parishes and schools where the accused served in the Archdiocese. In addition, the list includes names of deceased priests or priests who had long ago left the Archdiocese before the allegations were received and, where there is a single, plausible allegation of sexual misconduct against the priest even though it could not be investigated. Those names are being included in the 2018 Update out of respect and deference to the victim-survivors who made the reports.

LA Archdiocese adds new names to list of accused priests

LOS ANGELES (CA)
Angelus News

December 6, 2018

By Pablo Kay

The Archdiocese of Los Angeles released on Thursday an updated list of priests accused of sexual abuse of minors, with the report showing two cases of alleged abuse of current minors in the archdiocese since 2008.

The two cases were made public at the time the allegations were first received. Upon receiving the accusations, the archdiocese removed the two priests, Juan Cano and Jose Luis Cuevas, from ministry and reported them to law enforcement. Following separate investigations by police and by an Archdiocesan oversight board, the men were permanently removed from ministry.

“As disturbing as their behavior was, it shows that thanks to the swift action of alert teachers, parents and even children themselves, we can catch signs of abusive behavior early,” said Dr. Heather Banis, Victims Assistance Ministry Coordinator for the Archdiocese.

Overall, the update added the names of 54 priests—27 of them now dead—to the Archdiocese’s “Report to the People of God,” originally published in 2004 by Cardinal Roger Mahony, and updated in 2005 and in 2008. The archdiocese has posted the full list, along with a message from Archbishop José H. Gomez, on a new website.

“We owe it to the victim-survivors of abuse to be fully transparent in listing the names of those who perpetrate this abuse,” Archbishop Gomez said.

Finding hope and healing in the face of the abuse crisis

NEW YORK (NY)
America Magazine

December 4, 2018

By Louis J. Cameli

In February of next year, Pope Francis will meet with presidents of episcopal conferences throughout the world to talk about the Catholic Church’s response to clerical abuse. The U.S. bishops met in November of this year and discussed the same topic. In many dioceses, parishes have been or will be hosting listening sessions for concerned parishioners. All these meetings are meant in some way to address the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church.

The current round of gatherings and news coverage strikes many people as sadly familiar—a replay of what happened in the early 2000s. But this is different. Today’s conversations have shifted. The focus now falls on bishops who were negligent, incompetent or downright devious in dealing with clergy who had perpetrated abuse against minors. This new scrutiny of abuse in the church, one earnestly hopes, will lead to necessary structural realignments. Reforms may include new paths for accountability and transparency, a more rigorous application of existing church law or its amendment if needed, and closer cooperation with civil authorities to deal with criminal activity and any related cover-up.

Structural reform and renewal are absolutely necessary to reclaim a measure of integrity for the church and—some would even say—for her very survival.

New Optimism Among State Democrats Over Potential Passage of Child Victims Act in 2019

BUFFALO (NY)
Spectrum Local News

December 5, 2018

By Mark Goshgarian

Democrats will head both the Assembly and the Senate next month after taking control away from the Republican majority in last month's election.

Tim Kennedy, Western New York's only Democratic senator and soon to be part of that majority, said in a statement:

"With a change in leadership, I'm confident we'll finally see powerful reform and long-overdue justice."

One of those reforms is the Child Victims Act, a measure that, in part, extends the age limit abuse victims can file civil suits or seek legal charges.

The measure passed the Assembly twice, but has stalled in the current GOP-controlled Senate.

USA Gymnastics Bankruptcy May Leave Sex-Abuse Victims Unpaid

UNITED STATES
Bloomberg

December 5, 2018

By Allison McNeely, Josh Saul and Eben Novy-Williams

USA Gymnastics, under threat of being decertified by the U.S. Olympic Committee, filed for bankruptcy after running short of funds to pay victims of Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse.

The organization filed for Chapter 11 status in the Southern District of Indiana on Wednesday with estimated total assets and liabilities of $50 million to $100 million, according to a court filing. USAG aims to continue operating while it settles the victims’ claims, which its says are covered by insurance previously purchased by the organization, according to a statement.

But in court filings, USAG said there may not be enough to go around. It estimated the potential impact of these lawsuits at $75 million and $150 million, while the organization has assets of just $6.5 million in cash and investments, and said that the insurance policy might prove insufficient.

“We owe it to the survivors to resolve, fully and finally, claims based on the horrific acts of the past and, through this process, seek to expedite resolution and help them move forward,” chair Kathryn Carson said in the statement.

The bankruptcy extends a tumultuous year for USA Gymnastics, which installed new leadership after the trial of former team doctor Larry Nassar. Nassar was sentenced to 60 years in federal prison on child pornography charges and another 40 to 125 years in prison for a decades-long string of sexual abuse. His victims number more than 150 current and former gymnasts, including several Olympic champions.

USA Gymnastics files for reorganization under Chapter 11 of Bankruptcy Code

INDIANAPOLIS (IN)
USA Gym

December 5, 2018

USA Gymnastics today filed a voluntary petition for protection under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Indiana. This filing will enable USA Gymnastics to continue to support its athletes, to fully operate and meet its responsibilities to the entire membership and to expeditiously resolve the claims made by the survivors of sexual abuse perpetrated by Larry Nassar.

“We owe it to the survivors to resolve, fully and finally, claims based on the horrific acts of the past and, through this process, seek to expedite resolution and help them move forward,” said Kathryn Carson, who was recently elected chair of the USA Gymnastics Board of Directors. “Our sport is safer and stronger thanks to the bravery of these women. The Chapter 11 filing and the expedited resolution of these claims are critical first steps in rebuilding the community’s trust.

“At the same time, the filing will allow us to continue the important work of supporting our outstanding gymnasts at all levels, including the current and next generation of Olympic hopefuls,” continued Carson. “Since joining the Board last June, I have been inspired by the commitment of our members -- the administrators, judges, coaches and club owners -- who work daily to foster a safe, positive and encouraging environment where thousands of young people can learn gymnastics and life skills, compete and pursue their dreams.

“We are moving forward with our plans to strengthen our organization to further support the work of our members and gymnasts,” said Carson. “We have made significant progress in implementing safety initiatives and are in the process of searching for a new CEO who has the experience to build a leadership team that will restore confidence in USA Gymnastics, and set and execute a clear vision for a successful future.”

USA Gymnastics files bankruptcy. Here’s what it could mean for Larry Nassar survivors

INDIANAPOLIS (IN)
Indianapolis Star

December 5, 2018

By Tim Evans, Nancy Armour, Rachel Axon and Marisa Kwiatkowski

USA Gymnastics filed for bankruptcy protection Wednesday, a move it says will help resolve lawsuits stemming from Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse, but one it’s also counting on to hold off the U.S. Olympic Committee.

The filing, in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Indiana, stays all “pending actions” against the governing body. That includes lawsuits filed by hundreds of Nassar survivors as well as the USOC’s Section 8 complaint aimed at stripping USA Gymnastics of its status as the national governing body.

“Our board has been talking about this bankruptcy strategy for a while now — well before the Section 8 complaint was filed,” said Kathryn Carson, chair of the USA Gymnastics board. “Our primary reason to do this is to expedite those survivor claims.”

But John Manly, an attorney who represents many of the survivors, was skeptical.

“Today’s bankruptcy filing by USA Gymnastics was the inevitable result of the inability of this organization to meet its core responsibility of protecting its athlete members from abuse," Manly said in a statement.

"The leadership of USA Gymnastics has proven itself to be both morally and financially bankrupt. They have inflicted and continue to inflict unimaginable pain on survivors and their families.”

USA Gymnastics, reeling from abuse claims, files for bankruptcy

UNITED STATES
Reuters

December 6, 2018

By Joseph Ax

USA Gymnastics, the sport's governing body, filed for bankruptcy on Wednesday, saying that it is staggering under the weight of lawsuits filed by hundreds of women who were sexually abused by former national team doctor Larry Nassar.

The organization's chairwoman, Kathryn Carson, cited the lawsuits in the decision to seek protection from creditors in federal bankruptcy court in Indianapolis.

"Our organization is a financially solid going concern but for the hundred lawsuits that we do have out there," Carson said on a conference call with reporters. "That is the primary reason that we made this filing, to use the Chapter 11 process as a vehicle for resolving those claims."

Nassar was sentenced to up to 300 years in prison in two different trials in Michigan last February after more than 350 women testified about abuse at his hands, including Olympic champions Aly Raisman and Jordyn Wieber.

The scandal prompted the entire board of directors at Indianapolis-based USA Gymnastics to resign, along with the president and athletic director at Michigan State University, where Nassar also worked. The school agreed to a $500 million settlement with his victims earlier this year.

Five things we know about priest Kenneth Hendricks accused of molesting altar boys in the Philippines

CINCINNATI (OH)
Cincinnati Enquirer

December 6, 2018

By Cameron Knight

A priest who started his career in Cincinnati more than 50 years ago has been detained in the Philippines on charges of molesting young boys.

Kenneth Bernard Hendricks was arrested by Philippine immigration authorities Wednesday. He has been indicted in Ohio. U.S. Attorney Ben Glassman will hold a press conference at 11 a.m. during which he is expected to reveal more details about the accusations.

Was This ‘Creepy’ Los Angeles Sex-Crimes Cop a Serial Predator?

LOS ANGELES (CA)
Daily Beast

December 4, 2018

By Emily Shugerman and Rich McHugh

A California woman says her warnings about Det. Neil Kimball went unheeded before he was accused of a raping a 14-year-old.

A veteran Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department detective was charged last week with tying up and raping a 14-year-old girl whose case he was investigating. The arrest of Neil Kimball, a seasoned sex-crimes investigator, sent shockwaves through the law-enforcement community—especially when it was revealed that he had already been accused of sexual misconduct years earlier.

But the allegations didn’t surprise Sara Abusheikh, a Los Angeles-based fashion designer who told The Daily Beast she tried to warn authorities about “creepy” Kimball four years ago. The detective assigned to investigate her sexual assault case repeatedly crossed the line, she said—making flirtatious comments, accusing her of liking her alleged assailant, and even encouraging her to go back to see him.

Lord, Have Mercy!

UNITED STATES
LinkedIn

November 14, 2018

By John Seng

Time to Reform The Catholic Church

People who attend Catholic Masses with any regularity will recognize the following ritual, as explained by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops:

At the very beginning of the Mass, the faithful recall their sins and place their trust in God's abiding mercy. The Penitential Act includes the Kyrie Eleison, a Greek phrase meaning, "Lord, have mercy." This litany recalls God's merciful actions throughout history.

At Sunday worship in recent months, it’s dawned on me that in this year’s new light of horrifying revelations of abuse by clergy over many years worldwide, maybe it’s time to turn the tables. Aren’t Catholics in the pews the ones who should expect their Catholic Church celebrants to, perhaps for the next 50 years, initiate each Mass by recalling the sins of priests, bishops and cardinals themselves, apologizing at every assembly and begging the Lord’s mercy?

Finding hope and healing in the face of the abuse crisis

NEW YORK (NY)
America Magazine

December 4, 2018

By Louis J. Cameli

In February of next year, Pope Francis will meet with presidents of episcopal conferences throughout the world to talk about the Catholic Church’s response to clerical abuse. The U.S. bishops met in November of this year and discussed the same topic. In many dioceses, parishes have been or will be hosting listening sessions for concerned parishioners. All these meetings are meant in some way to address the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church.

The current round of gatherings and news coverage strikes many people as sadly familiar—a replay of what happened in the early 2000s. But this is different. Today’s conversations have shifted. The focus now falls on bishops who were negligent, incompetent or downright devious in dealing with clergy who had perpetrated abuse against minors. This new scrutiny of abuse in the church, one earnestly hopes, will lead to necessary structural realignments. Reforms may include new paths for accountability and transparency, a more rigorous application of existing church law or its amendment if needed, and closer cooperation with civil authorities to deal with criminal activity and any related cover-up.

Structural reform and renewal are absolutely necessary to reclaim a measure of integrity for the church and—some would even say—for her very survival.

Structural reform and renewal are absolutely necessary to reclaim a measure of integrity for the church and—some would even say—for her very survival. These changes, however, are not enough to bring healing. The abuse crisis is about more than just logic and reason. The current crisis has revealed the unreliability of church leaders in protecting the flock entrusted to their care. And that matters very much to everyone with or without a direct experience of abuse. I would argue that any effective healing must take the experience of reliability versus unreliability as a central focus.

People familiar with the work of the British psychiatrist Donald Winnicott know the centrality of reliability for the most fundamental of human relationships. As Winnicott observed the interaction of infants and their mothers, it became apparent to him that the foundation of all healthy subsequent development for a child rested in the experience of that first and all-important mother-child relationship as reliable. When that early relationship turns out to be unreliable, as Winnicott saw in his psychotherapeutic practice with adults, people have significant problems relating to others and functioning well in their lives.

Difficult 2018: For pope, it was year to come to terms with abuse crisis

ROME (ITALY)
Catholic News Service

December 6, 2018

By Cindy Wooden

Pope Francis marked the fifth anniversary of his election in March in the midst of a firestorm over his handling of clerical sexual abuse and bishops’ accountability in Chile.

He soon apologized for his slow response and invited Chilean abuse survivors to the Vatican and then all the country’s bishops to meet with him in May. By mid-October, the pope had dismissed two Chilean bishops from the priesthood and accepted the resignations of seven others.

The firestorm began when Pope Francis visited Chile and Peru in January, but the trip also included a meeting with the region’s indigenous peoples, marking an important stage in the preparation for the 2019 special Synod of Bishops on the Amazon, which will focus on safeguarding creation and on the pastoral care of the people who live in the region.

Also during 2018, Pope Francis traveled to the Geneva headquarters of the World Council of Churches to celebrate the ecumenical body’s 70th anniversary; he went to Ireland for the World Meeting of Families; and he visited the Baltic nations of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia.

Retired State Police Captain to oversee Roman Catholic Diocese of Harrisburg’s youth protection programs

HARRISBURG (PA)
Fox 43

December 6, 2018

A retired Captain who successfully ran the Megan’s Law Section of the Pennsylvania State Police will run the Roman Catholic Diocese of Harrisburg’s Safe Environment program. Retired Capt. Janet A. McNeal, through her firm Law and Grace Consulting, will review the Diocese’s current youth protection programs, develop programs and policies to make any needed improvements and will serve as our Safe Environment Coordinator.

“Captain McNeal brings a wealth of experience with her,” said Bishop Ronald W. Gainer. “As a contractor with the Diocese, she is a neutral party, with no conflicts of interest, who has dedicated her entire professional career to seeing that justice is served and survivors of a range of crimes, but specifically sexual crimes, are heard and supported.

“As part of her role, Capt. McNeal will review every clergy child abuse case reported to the Diocese, in order to evaluate what went wrong and help us continue improving our youth protection policies and trainings, as a means of reducing the risk for future abuse.”

McNeal brings 26 years of law enforcement investigative and policy development experience to this position. She has a three year contract with the Diocese and will operate independently, reporting her recommendations directly to Bishop Gainer. McNeal has been granted complete access to all the Diocese’s records. In addition to reviewing every case reported to the Diocese, McNeal will also meet with survivors to hear their stories and determine what stage they are at in the healing process.

Mobile Catholic Archdiocese names 29 priests, clergy accused of child sex abuse since 1950

MOBILE (AL)
AL.com

December 6, 2018

By Christopher Harress

The Archdiocese of Mobile released Thursday 29 names of Catholic priests, deacons and brothers who have been credibly accused of sexually abusing a child since 1950.

The first 12 names are those that were formally part of the Archdiocese of Mobile, while the second list contains 17 names of men and priests who belong to religious orders but were not formally attached to the Archdiocese.

In an accompanying letter, Archbishop Thomas Rodi asked for forgiveness from those that had been hurt.

“The most vulnerable members of the Church, the children, have been grievously hurt by clergy and religious, the very people who should have been trusted to help and not to injure,” wrote Archbishop Rodi. “In addition, the Church has at times failed to act as it should have to immediately protect children and to promptly remove those who have preyed upon them. To all the people of the Church, and especially to the victims of child sexual abuse by clergy and religious, I ask for your forgiveness. From the depths of my heart, I ask your forgiveness.”

Amid Scandal After Scandal, One Catholic Mother Faces A Painful Choice

NEW YORK (NY)
Vogue Magazine

December 6, 2018

By Mary Beth Keane

The joke about my younger son, Emmett, is that at age seven he’d still crawl back into my womb if he could. He’s more reserved than his gregarious older brother, and sticks to me in social situations that overwhelm him. He worries about things that wouldn’t even occur to another child. Recently I picked him up from a birthday party and also collected the sons of two close friends to spare them a trip. Walking across the parking lot in a foursome of first-grade boys, Emmett kept glancing at another classmate who was leaving with his mother. Later he told me he worried the boy had seen the group heading to our car and thought Emmett was having a “big fun playdate” and hadn’t invited him, and that his feelings might have been hurt.

Tall, with skinny limbs and hair the color of a penny, Emmett often chooses a collection of Bible stories my mother gave him years ago as a bedtime book. One evening he asked me about “the holy cracker” he’s going to get to try soon, when he makes his first Holy Communion in second grade.

“That’s the Eucharist,” I told him. “The priest performs a miracle on the altar, and that cracker becomes the body of Christ.” Like all things to do with Catholic doctrine, it feels insane when said aloud. When it comes to religion, the only concern my kids really have is whether everyone who’s good ends up in Heaven. I’ve decided to simply say yes. Will the dog go to Heaven? Yes. The same Heaven as us? Yes. I deliver these answers with total confidence, as if I know.

Ex-priest accused of abuse employed by CWLP

SPRINGFIELD (IL)
Springfield Journal Register

December 5, 2018

By Crystal Thomas

A city of Springfield employee appears on the list the Catholic Diocese of Springfield released last week that named priests it said had been credibly accused of sexually abusing minors.

Joseph D. Cernich, 62, of Springfield, was laicized, or stripped of his priestly duties, in June 2003 and hired by the city in November of the same year. Cernich currently works as a technical support specialist in City Water, Light and Power’s information systems division and makes about $56,000 a year.

Requests for comment from Cernich went unanswered. He hung up when The State Journal-Register called his work phone number.

In response to a State Journal-Register inquiry into whether the new information affects Cernich’s employment, city attorney Jim Zerkle wrote the “the situation is presently under review.”

″... (C)onsistent with the City personnel policy, the City cannot comment on individual personnel matters,” Zerkle wrote.

Feds: Former Cincinnati priest accused of sexually abusing 'multiple young boys'

MANILA (PHILIPPINES)
Associated Press

December 6, 2018

By Jim Gomez

Philippine immigration authorities say they have arrested an American Roman Catholic priest accused of sexually assaulting altar boys in a remote central town in a case one official described as "shocking and appalling."

Bureau of Immigration spokeswoman Dana Sandoval said Thursday the Rev. Kenneth Bernard Hendricks, who has been indicted in Ohio for alleged illicit sexual conduct in the Philippines, was arrested in a church in Naval town on the island province of Biliran.

An Ohio court had issued a warrant for the arrest of 77-year-old Hendricks, who has been living in the Philippines for 37 years, Sandoval said, adding that the U.S. criminal case stemmed from complaints from Filipino minors who were allegedly victimized in the Philippines.

Hendricks is listed on the Archdiocese of Cincinnati website as a missionary in Asia.

Federal officials will announce charges against Hendricks at 11 a.m. Thursday. WCPO will live stream the announcement.

A testament of faith

BUFFALO (NY)
The Spectrum

December 6, 2018

Monsignor Patrick Keleher of UB’s Newman Center does not want Catholic students to lose faith, despite the reemergence of a 17-year sexual abuse scandal that has again rocked the Catholic Church.

He’s been in the church for half a century and knows worshippers in the Buffalo Diocese, which has in the past year been consumed with a new string of abuse accusations and calls by prominent Catholics for Bishop Richard Malone to resign. He knows Catholics worldwide are undergoing a crisis of faith.

But Keleher believes the 2,000-year-old Catholic Church will find its strength again.

“We pray that the church can change,” said Keleher, the director of the Newman Center, which has served Catholic students since 1936. “We need change and we’ve had too much secrecy, too much clericalism, all of the things we hear about all the time.”

UB’s Catholic community wants to bring believers together to help them maintain their faith and discuss how the church can change moving forward so such acts won’t happen again, local religious leaders told The Spectrum. Community churches like the Newman Center and the St. Joseph University Parish near South Campus are coming to terms with the abuse scandal through forums and discussions, as priests are opening their doors and listening to students’ and community members’ concerns.


Sioux City diocesan officials to discuss clergy sexual abuse with AG

SIOUX CITY (IA)
Sioux City Journal

December 6, 2018

By Nick Hytrek

Leaders of the Diocese of Sioux City and the diocese's attorney will meet with Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller Thursday to discuss child sexual abuse allegations against clergy members.

Miller will meet with Bishop R. Walker Nickless, the Rev. Bradley Pelzel, vicar general of the diocese, and Sioux City attorney Mike Ellwanger. The four will discuss sex abuse issues in the diocese, how to move forward and the development of a list of priests who have been credibly accused, said Susan O'Brien, director of development and communications for the diocese.

Miller is meeting individually with each of the four Catholic bishops in Iowa. The meetings were requested by Archbishop Michael Jackels, archbishop of the Archdiocese of Dubuque, O'Brien said.

In a letter Tuesday to priests, deacons and other boards throughout the Sioux City Diocese, Nickless announced the meeting and other steps the dioceses is taking to address allegations of sexual abuse and the perception that church officials have kept information from the public.

"I know there is a lot of confusion, sadness and upset about clergy sexual abuse, past and present, as well as about information being shared in the news about clergy in our diocese," Walker wrote. "I am sorry that we are all going through this, and I am praying for all of you. I hope you also pray for me, our clergy, as well as the dedicated staff throughout our diocese."

American Priest Is Accused of Molesting Boys in the Philippines

MANILA (PHILIPPINES)
New York Times

December 6, 2018

By Jason Gutierrez

An elderly American priest has been arrested by United States Homeland Security agents on charges that he sexually assaulted at least seven Filipino altar boys in the rural central Philippines, where he has ministered for decades.

The suspect, Rev. Kenneth Bernard Hendricks, 77, was arrested Wednesday in the town of Naval, an impoverished community in Biliran Province, said Dana Krizia Sandoval, a spokeswoman for the immigration bureau of the Philippines.

“We received information from U.S. authorities regarding the alleged sexual exploitation of multiple minor Filipino boys by Hendricks,” Ms. Sandoval said. “Several of his victims have come forward with their statements.”

Ms. Sandoval said “at least seven children have come forward, but our sources estimate at least 50 cases have been unreported.”

Operatives from the immigration bureau’s Fugitive Search Unit joined with the national police and Homeland Security agents in making the arrest, which shocked residents in the community of 50,000.

“Hendricks allegedly sexually assaulted a number of boys living in his residence,” Ms. Sandoval said, adding that the priest allegedly told the boys that he would be imprisoned if the authorities learned of his behavior.

“It is shocking and appalling,” she added. “I am horrified reading the charges against him. We will not allow sexual predators to prey on our children.”

The priest allegedly ordered the boys to take baths with him and molested them either one on one or with other boys, she said.

A Former Australian Archbishop Has Been Cleared of Covering Up Child Sex Abuse

NEWCASTLE (AUSTRALIA)
Associated Press

December 6, 2018

An Australian appeal court has overturned a conviction against the most senior Roman Catholic cleric ever found guilty of covering up child sex abuse.

New South Wales state District Court Judge Roy Ellis on Thursday upheld former Adelaide Archbishop Philip Wilson’s appeal against his May conviction for concealing the sexual abuse of two altar boys by a pedophile priest in the 1970s. Ellis found there is reasonable doubt that the 68-year-old cleric had committed the crime, which is punishable by up to two years in prison.

Wilson has served almost four months of a year-long home detention sentence at his sister’s house outside Newcastle. He was to become eligible for parole after serving six months.

The judge also dismissed a prosecution appeal against the leniency of the sentence.

Syracuse diocese lists accused priests with Oneida County ties

UTICA (NY)
Utica Observer Dispatch

December 6, 2018

By Greg Mason

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse has confirmed 41 former clergy members accused of child sex abuse had ties to parishes in Oneida County at one time or another.

The diocese earlier this week released a list of 57 clergy members in total who were accused of child sex abuse. Of the 57, 37 were tied to allegations the diocese found credible. Only 19 of the 57 are still alive; there is no priest in active ministry in the diocese with a credible complaint of child sexual abuse, according to the diocese.

The clergy members on the lists are either dead, removed from ministry, dismissed from the clerical state or laicized.

To be removed from ministry is to remain a priest in spirit, though the person cannot function, identify themself or act as a priest or wear clerical attire. Those dismissed were released from the clerical state and are no longer affiliated with the diocese. Those laicized voluntarilty were dispensed from clerical obligations and also have no ties to the diocese, according to the diocese.

A diocese spokeswoman said the diocese could not provide the parishes each clergy member has been affiliated with at this time. Using newspaper archives and online records, the Observer-Dispatch has identified parishes where a number of the priests once served in the Oneida County area.

Federal and state raids on diocesan offices

LONDON (ENGLAND)
The Tablet

December 6, 2018

By Michael Sean Winters

The unfolding clergy sex-abuse scandal in the US widened last week, with a joint raid by federal, state and local police on the office of Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the US bishops’ conference and Archbishop of Galveston-Houston, writes Michael Sean Winters.

The Montgomery County prosecutor, Brett Ligon, said the raid was targeted specifically at recovering documents relating to allegations made against Fr Manuel La Rose-Lopez.

Arrested in September, the priest is accused of two counts of sexual indecency with a child between 1998 and 2000. Ligon emphasised the narrow scope of the search, saying: “This is not a search warrant of the Catholic Church, nor is it of its employees.” However, Ligon also indicated that Cardinal DiNardo and his staff had not been informed of the warrant in advance. “The State of Texas is not required to go through the Catholic Church” in its investigations, he said.

Television images of police removing crates of documents from the chancery building spread across the Internet.

The same day, the office of the Attorney General of New Mexico served a similar search warrant on the administrative offices of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe, seeking documents related to two priests, Marvin Archuleta and Sabine Griego, previously accused of sex abuse. The archdiocese had previously removed both men from ministry and in 2017 it published their names with those of 72 other clergy credibly accused of sexually abusing minors.

Fortitude! A Call to Stay Engaged in Resolving the Abuse Scandal

IRONDALE (AL)
National Catholic Register

November 29, 2018

By Msgr. Charles Pope

Many today rightly speak of the need for courage in the midst of the current sexual abuse scandal and its coverup. It does indeed take courage to speak out and engage in the awkward task of insisting on accountability and reform from our bishops and the Pope, whom we have been taught to revere and respect. There are potential dangers, especially for clergy and lay leaders in the Church, who may risk sanctions of some sort for speaking up. (Thankfully, most bishops have been tolerant of the airing of grievances and calls for reform.) There are also consequences for speaking out that are more irksome than dangerous, such as being labeled divisive, negative, unjust or a scandal-monger.

While courage would be the more common way to describe what is needed, I would argue that the more traditional term “fortitude” may be a more accurate description of what will be required to ensure this crisis is addressed credibly and in a lasting manner. Courage is a part of fortitude, but as a cardinal virtue and especially as a gift of the Holy Spirit, fortitude has other important aspects.

The cardinal virtue of fortitude enables us to withstand even great difficulties that hinder us from attaining our goal; a chief feature is being able to see an act or decision through to the end, despite obstacles. So it is more than being brave or courageous in the face of danger or sallying forth into battle; it is also being steadfast in the face of difficulty and enduring without sadness or loss of faith. Fortitude’s loftiest expression is prudently facing down danger and even death, but it is operative at levels short of mortal danger as well. The most common act of fortitude is enduring in order to see a thing through despite obstacles, hardships, persecution and other difficulties.

St. Thomas lists four “parts” of fortitude in his Summa Theologiae (II, IIae, qq. 123-140), and all of them are important as we seek to remain steadfast in insisting on reform and accountability that is credible and substantial. I would like to list each of the four parts and relate them to the current sexual abuse crisis.

Editorial | Ruling protecting priest anonymity unfair to victims

PITTSBURGH (PA).
The Pitt News

December 6, 2018

Pennsylvania’s Catholic dioceses is no stranger to sexual assault allegations. A grand jury released a report in August detailing the sexual abuse of more than 1,000 minors committed by more than 300 Catholic clergymen, 11 of whom had their names redacted.

On Monday, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court voted 6-1 to keep those 11 priests anonymous.

“[The ruling] is a victory for all Pennsylvanians,” Justin Danilewitz, an attorney who represented many of the priests in August’s grand jury report, said. “Victims can take comfort … that their voices were heard, but not at the expense of innocent individuals.”

But the decision is only a victory for serial sexual abusers and self-interested church officials. It completely denies victims the justice they deserve and erases the network of accountability the Catholic Church desperately needs to bring assailants to justice.

Parishioners’ petition calls for papal investigation of Fort Worth diocese and bishop

FORT WORTH (TX)
Star Telegram

December 6, 2018

By Nichole Manna and Bill Hanna

A petition requesting an investigation by the Catholic Church into the Diocese of Fort Worth and Bishop Michael Olson had more than 400 signatures as of Wednesday afternoon.

The petition comes after years of turmoil between some of the parishes and the bishop. It’s spearheaded by parishioners at St. Martin de Porres in Prosper.

“Since his ordination as our Bishop in January of 2014, Bishop Olson has operated against canon law on numerous occasions, has employed abusive language and vindictive actions against priests and the lay faithful in our diocese,” the petition on the Care2 Petitions website states.

A number of the problems between parishioners and Olson have played out in public, including the removal of Father Richard Kirkham from St. Martin de Porres over the summer, a change in leadership at Fort Worth’s Nolan Catholic High School during Olson’s first year as bishop, as well as the closure of the San Mateo Catholic Church and the Catholic Renewal Center.

The petition also mentioned the departure of numerous priests, including Rev. Jeff Poirot, who was known for his beer-making skills but was asked by Olson to stop the activity while he was at Holy Family Catholic Church in Fort Worth. Poirot has since taken a leave of absence from active ministry.

A question for editors: Pondering the difference between the Catholic 'church' and its 'hierarchy'

Get Religion

December 5, 2018

By Clemente Lisi

Is there a difference between the Catholic “church and its “hierarchy”?

That’s a question that very few, if any, editors and reporters working in either the mainstream or religious press seem to have asked themselves. It’s just another of the many questions to come out of the clerical sex-abuse scandal and the downfall of now-former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick that highlighted news coverage since this summer.

It’s a question that was surfaced by Father Thomas Reese (for decades a major source in many mainstream news reports) in a recent opinion piece that ran on Religion News Service. Journalists need to think about what he’s saying, so here’s an excerpt:

I remember in the 1980s taking a tour of the House of Commons in London. The tour guide pointed to a plaque on the wall in honor of a minister “who was killed by the Irish Catholics.” Not the IRA, not the Provos, not the terrorists, but the Irish Catholics.

Department of Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta Must Go

WASHINGTON (DC)
Verdict

December 6, 2018

By Marci Hamilton

Last week, the Miami Herald published a searing investigative report by reporter Julie Brown on the fact that multi-millionaire Jeffrey Epstein sexually abused dozens of girls at his home in Palm Beach and was permitted to cut a ridiculously lenient deal with local, state, and federal prosecutors. He was allowed to plead to two counts of prostitution, leading to a measly 13-month sentence, where he was even treated to daily work release. He did have to register as a sex offender, but with dozens of girls there and across the United States (and the globe) as his victims, the deal was beyond the pale. This was yet another instance when men in power kept each other’s secrets and covered them up as though the victims were basically collateral to the “real” issues, like men’s reputations and power. We have seen this again and again, whether it was President Graham Spanier of Penn State failing to stop Sandusky or the bishops trading around pedophile priests as though they are chess pieces rather than dangerous weapons against children. There is not a lot of daylight between these examples. Indeed, the Catholic Church’s problems in this arena are a blueprint for understanding the whole map, as I discussed here.

Why did Epstein get this deal? One has to wonder whether it didn’t have something to do with the fact that his friends and cohorts were powerful, including former President Bill Clinton and President Donald Trump and his lawyers—a veritable who’s who list like Ken Starr (whose failures in this arena I discussed here) and Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz, among others. Both Trump and Dershowitz have been implicated in the abuse side of Epstein’s lifestyle, but both deny it.

There is no question that the system for protecting children is broken when a federal prosecutor chooses a cozy plea deal like Epstein’s. A prosecutor is supposed to represent the public interest in safety and be a “crimestopper.” The Epstein case was a textbook on serial pedophiliac behavior with children not only abused but also paid to bring in other children. The federal prosecutor who let Epstein get away with this level of sexual assault of girls was Alexander Acosta, who at the time was the South Florida United States Attorney and is now the Secretary of Labor in the Trump administration. Not only did Acosta let him get away with it, this prosecutor also cut the victims out of the process. They didn’t even know there was going to be a plea until they read about it. Far from being permitted to testify at his sentencing as did over 100 victims of Dr. Larry Nassar, these victims were completely ignored. These girls, most of whom were poor and came from broken homes, were throwaway victims.

December 5, 2018

Survivor of Clergy Childhood Sexual Abuse Speaks Out Against the Diocese of Oakland

OAKLAND (CA)
Law office of Joseph C. George

December 5, 2018

At a news conference, a survivor of childhood sexual abuse by long-time perpetrator Father Vincent Breen speaks out against the Diocese of Oakland and urges any survivors of clergy childhood sexual abuse to report to the Attorney General’s office.

The Diocese of Oakland knew of Father Vincent Breen’s sexual abuse of children
In 1967, Sharon McCann (then 13 years old) and her mother reported Breen’s sexual abuse of Sharon to Sister Jean Higgins, the principal of Holy Spirit
The Diocese of Oakland failed to report the sexual abuse to any law enforcement agency and child protective services agencies
Fremont Police Department concluded that Father Vincent Breen sexually abused at least eight (8) young girls in 1981.
Now, on November 23, 2018, the Diocese of Oakland announced that it would not release a list of priests credibly abused of childhood sexual abuse until 2019 supposedly because the Diocese had not been in touch with some victims “in years” and that “It’s a situation in which you don’t want to re-traumatize people, because even though their names aren’t going to be there, the name of their perpetrator could be released.”
The Diocese of Oakland knew of Sharon McCann’s report and knew of the identities of the young girls in the 1981 Fremont Police Report and never contacted any victim

Gay SF pastor arrested on child porn charges

SAN FRANCISCO (CA)
Bay State Reporter

December 5, 2018

By Alex Madison

A gay San Francisco pastor, who has historically fought for gay rights in the Lutheran Church, was arrested on charges of possession of child pornography, according to the San Francisco Police Department.

The Reverend Steven Sabin, pastor at Christ Church Lutheran at Quintara Street and 20th Avenue, was arrested November 15 on three felony charges.

Sabin, 59, was arraigned November 21 and pleaded not guilty to one count of distribution of child pornography and two counts of possession or control of child pornography, according to a spokesman for the San Francisco District Attorney's office. Private defense attorney Art Lipton is representing Sabin. Lipton did not respond to a request for comment from the Bay Area Reporter.

Buffalo Diocese offers woman $400,000 to settle sex abuse claim against priest

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

December 5, 2018

The Buffalo Diocese has offered $400,000 to a woman who accused the Rev. Fabian J. Maryanski of sexually abusing her when she was a teenager in the 1980s.

It’s the largest known settlement offered under a new diocese program aimed at compensating victims of clergy sex abuse.

Stephanie McIntyre, who lives in South Carolina, said Wednesday that she probably will accept the offer but was still working out all of the emotions she’s experienced since first learning about it from her lawyer, Barry Covert, on Tuesday.

Offers began going out to victims last Friday, and two lawyers who represent many victims said this week that about 20 early award amounts ranged from $10,000 to $360,000.

McIntyre, 50, is the first survivor of abuse in the Buffalo Diocese who has spoken publicly about an award offer. She will have 60 days to accept the offer, in exchange for agreeing not to sue the diocese over the abuse.

She told The Buffalo News the money “will have zero impact in my life.”

“It was never about the money. It was about accountability, and that still has not occurred,” she said.

McIntyre criticized the diocese for not adding Maryanski to its list of priests who were credibly accused of abuse.

“I feel that without placing my abuser on 'the list,' the diocese is saying: ‘Just take the money and shut up. The justices may believe you, but we don't,’ " she said. “It begs the question, what does Maryanski have on them that is keeping him safely off that list?”

The Diocese of Las Cruces Releases Names of Accused Priests, SNAP Responds

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

December 5, 2018

The Diocese of Las Cruces in New Mexico has released a list of names of priests who have been “credibly accused” of sexual abuse.

We are grateful to Attorney General Hector Balderas for compelling the diocese to take this action. Without his active investigation into clergy sex abuse, we doubt that this list would have been released nor would it have included as much detail as it currently does. We hope that any survivors who are encouraged to come forward by this disclosure will take advantage of the resources that the attorney general’s office has made available on their website and make their report to independent law enforcement authorities, not to the Church.

It is worth noting that this announcement refers only to “credible accusations.” This, in our opinion, means that many names are probably missing from this list. Church officials are not the best arbiters of what is credible and what is not, especially since there have been many examples – such as this case in California – where accusations deemed “not credible” actually turned out to be very real. We believe that Bishops should release all names and allow independent law enforcement officials to determine credibility.

Can Baltimore's archbishop bring accountability to West Virginia's Catholic Church?

BALTIMORE (MD)
Baltimore Sun

December 5, 2018

By Vincent DeGeorge

Pope Francis in late August appointed Baltimore Archbishop William E. Lori to lead an investigation into the alleged “sexual harassment of adults” by former Catholic bishop Michael J. Bransfield of the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, which comprises all of West Virginia. However, Archbishop Lori’s own record and actions seem to demonstrate a church “protectionism” that comes at the expense of transparency and accountability.

In 2002, when he was Bishop of Bridgeport, Conn., Archbishop Lori participated in writing the Dallas Charter, the U.S. Catholic Church’s most substantial accountability policy document on clerical sexual abuse which purports “zero tolerance.” However, here Archbishop Lori contributed to removing bishops from accountability under this document saying that the drafting committee “would limit it to priests and deacons, as the disciplining of bishops is beyond the purview of this document.”

Archbishop Lori also fought a multi-year legal battle to keep hidden Bridgeport clerical sex abuse records, some dating back as far as the 1960s, instead of readily complying with a state order to make them public. Archbishop Lori’s containment efforts finally ended in 2009 when the U.S. Supreme Court refused to block the release of documents.

Syracuse diocese: List of sexually abusive priests might be incomplete

SYRACUSE (NY)
Syracuse.com

December 5, 2018

By Julie McMahon

The Catholic Diocese of Syracuse has acknowledged its list of 57 priests accused of child sex abuse could be incomplete.

The diocese published the list for the first time on Monday, after years of advocates calling for more transparency in the handling of clergy sex abuse cases.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse has released a list of priests who faced credible allegations of abuse.

A chorus of those same advocates -- including victims and lawyers -- now say the list is incomplete. Three survivors of clergy sex abuse and three lawyers who have represented victims told Syracuse.com they were aware of allegations against priests who were not on the list.

Diocese Chancellor Danielle Cummings said her office has heard from people who believe the list is incomplete.

As allegations surface, the diocese will investigate and update the list as needed, Cummings said. The list is published on the diocese's website. Cummings said she expects to make a public announcement if any new names are added.

The diocese is still investigating allegations concerning conduct from decades ago, Cummings said. The allegations surfaced in the last year as the diocese started a compensation program for victims, she said.

Yet advocates say the list also excludes names of priests who were reported to the diocese years or even decades ago.

Diocese of Las Cruces releases names of credibly accused priests

SILVER CITY (NM)
Silver City Daily Press

By Christine Steele

December 5, 2018

Last month, the Diocese of Las Cruces published the names of 28 priests who have been credibly
accused of sexual misconduct with minors and have served within the geographical boundary of the diocese. Among these are several priests who served in churches in Grant County, mostly during the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. The last priest served in 1990.

In addition to the names, the list also includes, if known, the dates of the alleged incidents, the date they were reported to the diocese, the status of the accused and the date and location of their assignments in the diocese.

The publication of the list of names comes after the diocese received a letter from New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas demanding “full disclosure and full transparency” following the release of a Pennsylvania grand jury report with ties to New Mexico that details a massive cover-up of sexual abuse by priests in that state, according to an Aug. 14 story in the Washington Post.

In the letter to Las Cruces Bishop Oscar Cantu, Balderas wrote that like the Pennsylvania cases, most of the New Mexico cases would never be criminally prosecuted due to the statute of limitations having passed. But, he wrote, “Any complacency or silence in answer to misconduct must not be tolerated.”

In some instances, the abuse is alleged to have occurred prior to the Diocese of Las Cruces being established in 1982 or in another diocese altogether, but the individuals have been included because they served in the Diocese of Las Cruces at some point, the release said. Some of those identified have died and the rest have been removed from the ministry or retired.

Church leaders speechless

SANDUSKY (OH)
Sandusky Register

December 5, 2018

By Matt Westerhold

Almost three months after launching an investigation into allegations that a local bishop molested two boys beginning in the late 1970s, leaders of the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World Inc. church have not announced any findings.

They also will not say whether any disciplinary action has been taken in response to the allegations. It appears, however, the church took no action after investigating, or church leaders failed to address the molestation allegations, entirely.

Church leaders said in September the Rev. Rufus Sanders would step down from his leadership post At Emmanuel Temple on Adams Street in Sandusky while church leaders investigated allegations made by brothers Roy and Victor Matthews. It has not been confirmed, however, whether Sanders ever stepped down or if he remains bishop.

The Matthews brothers contend Sanders repeatedly molested and raped them when they were children. Achie and Odell Matthews, their parents, were founding members of Emmanuel Temple, and Sanders was its founding minister.

Bishop's release of abusers' names: healing, courageous, not enough (Your letters)

SYRACUSE (NY)
Syracuse.com

December 5, 2018

To the Editor:

I write as a 67-year-old survivor, former victim, advocate, author of "In The Shadow Of The Cross," support person, lecturer, SNAP Leader of Syracuse and CNY, also greater Raleigh, North Carolina.

Monday was a day of very mixed emotions for survivors ("Syracuse diocese releases list of 57 sexually abusive priests," Dec. 2, 2018). It was long coming. It should've been done years ago. I was happy to see that some of the priests are on the list, finally. I was also sad to see some that were reported to me and the diocese that were not on the list. For the survivors of those priests, it had to be an especially sad day. Survivors want justice and accountability.

I have been helping survivors for the past 16 years. I have listened to their pain and told them they are not alone. I continue to try so hard to make them feel that there is hope.

The bishop said Monday that some survivors did not want the pedophiles' names released. I take exception to that. I have been answering a national hotline for those sexually abused three days a week for at least 10 years. I have spoken to thousands of victims, and I have never heard once, not once, that they want their predator not publicly named. Survivors say they do not want to have their names released but never say "don't expose my predator." The release of the names allows others to come forward and begin their healing. It is a very hard thing to do -- to admit that this has happened to you. And I always respect the victim. I believe it's the church's idea not to identify the perpetrators in order to keep the public from knowing the truth.

To recover from sex abuse scandal, Catholic hierarchy must change (Commentary)

SYRACUSE (NY)
Syracuse.com

December 5, 2018

By Dave Pasinski

"No, it can't be. He was such a good priest."

"I'm glad to finally see this man's name made public. He damaged the lives of so many people"

"What a tragedy! For his victims and for him and for society and for the Church."

"This should've been stopped long ago. It was the bishops' fault that things went as bad as they did."

These statements represent the range of reactions to the release of the names of Syracuse diocesan priests that were credibly found to have been sexual abusers. While it may come from a variety of motivations, Bishop Robert Cunningham deserves credit for publishing these names, but there is no joy in recognizing the history of what this represents.

Arzobispado enviará al Vaticano antecedentes sobre investigación a sacerdote Diego Ossa, miembro del círculo cercano de Karadima

[Archbishop will send Vatican information on the investigation into priest Diego Ossa, member of Karadima's inner circle]

CHILE
La Tercera

December 4, 2018

By Claudia Soto

La Iglesia chilena busca que la Congregación para la Doctrina de la Fe determine si hay elementos suficientes para ordenar un proceso penal u otras medidas.

Esta tarde, el Arzobispado de Santiago informó a través de un comunicado que remitirá los antecedentes sobre la investigación previa que pesa contra el sacerdote Diego Ossa, a la Congregación para la Doctrina de la Fe.

‘Shootball’, un pelotazo irritante para la pederastia en la Iglesia

["Shootball" is first documentary about clergy abuse among Marists in Catalonia]

MADRID (SPAIN)
El País

By Julio Núñez

El primer documental sobre el caso de los maristas en Cataluña relata el silencio y el encubrimiento de dicha orden respecto a los abusos sexuales en sus colegios

"Tenía una adicción, un comportamiento distorsionado. Pero no era un pederasta, sino que actuaba como uno". Con esta frase el exprofesor Joaquín Benítez del colegio marista de Barcelona Sants-Les Corts intenta explicar las razones por las que abusó de una veintena de niños desde 1980 hasta 2016. Con mirada esquiva, Benítez aparece entrevistado el documental Shootball, el primero en tratar de manera extensa los casos de pederastia en varios colegios de la orden de los maristas en Cataluña. Su director, Fèlix Colomer, reconstruye el relato a través de entrevistas a víctimas, familiares, abogados, profesores, políticos y especialistas de cómo salió a la luz uno de los casos de pederastia en la Iglesia española más significativos de los últimos años. "No se estaba haciendo nada sobre este tema y decidimos entrevistar a Manuel Barbero [padre de una víctima] y filmar cómo llamaba a Benítez. Fue un material muy potente [el abusador reconoció los hechos y pidió perdón] y decidimos seguir investigado. Hemos estado año y medio grabado", explica el cineasta.

Los ex seminaristas de Astorga exigen al obispo castigo a los encubridores de los pederastas en la Iglesia

[Former seminarians of Astorga demand that bishop punish those who covered up abuse in the Church]

ASTORGA (SPAIN)
El País

By Julio Núñez

Una veintena de exalumnos se manifiestan para pedir la excomunión del abusador José Manuel Ramos, castigado a un año de ejercicios espirituales

Cargados con carteles contra los abusos sexuales en la Iglesia, una veintena de exalumnos del seminario menor de La Bañeza (León) y del colegio Juan XXIII de Puebla de Sanabria (Zamora) han acudido este sábado a las puertas del obispado de Astorga para protestar contra la pena canónica que el actual obispo y presidente de la comisión contra la pederastia de la Conferencia Episcopal Española (CEE), Juan Antonio Menéndez, ha impuesto al sacerdote José Manuel Ramos Gordón por abusar sexualmente de al menos un niño en el colegio Juan XIII a principios de los ochenta y de otros tres en La Bañeza entre 1988 y 1989. El castigo: un año de ejercicios espirituales por los delitos de La Bañeza —tras una denuncia silenciada en 2017— y la expulsión a un monasterio fuera de la diócesis durante 10 años por el del colegio zamorano, esta última sentencia anunciada en septiembre por la diócesis.

Columna: Necios

[Column: Fools]

SPAIN
El País

December 5, 2018

By Leila Guerriero

Alguien tendría que explicar a estos sujetos que las personas abusadas no hablan cuando quieren sino cuando pueden

Los curas tienen su propia Liga de la Justicia, y así logran que sus colegas pedófilos obtengan, como condena, graciosos retiros espirituales. Hay motivos para creer que los fallos de la tal Liga, además, se basan en la ignorancia. Este diario publicó conversaciones que el obispo de Salamanca, Carlos López, sostuvo en 2013 con Javier Paz, que denunció al cura Isidro López por haber abusado de él entre sus 12 y sus 20 años. En ellas, el obispo le reprocha a Paz: “¿Por qué no lo han denunciado a su debido tiempo? Ahora la Iglesia es culpable de haberlo ocultado (...) ¿las víctimas por qué se han callado?”.

La Iglesia aparta al exdeán de la Catedral de Santiago acusado de tocamientos a jóvenes

[Cathedral of Santiago priest removed from public duties after accusations he touched young people]

SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELLA (SPAIN)
El País

November 27, 2018

By Sonia Vizoso

Los supuestos abusos ocurrieron en Mondoñedo (Lugo) y el Obispado resta importancia al asunto: "No se sentían víctimas de nada"

Un sacerdote de Mondoñedo (Lugo) ha sido apartado por la Iglesia tras ser denunciado a finales de agosto por tocamientos ante el obispo de la diócesis de Mondoñedo-Ferrol, Luis Ángel de las Heras. Se trata, según han confirmado a este periódico fuentes eclesiásticas, del exdeán de la Catedral de Santiago José María Díaz Fernández, de 88 años, máxima autoridad en el templo compostelano cuando fue robado el Códice Calixtino en 2011 y hermano del actual deán de la Catedral de Mondoñedo, Pedro Díaz Fernández.

American priest arrested in the Philippines for alleged sexual abuse of up to 50 boys

MANILA (PHILIPPINES)
The Strait Times

December 5, 2018

By Raul Dancel

A 77-year-old American priest was arrested in the Philippines on Wednesday (Dec 5) for allegedly molesting dozens of boys while serving for over three decades at a church in Biliran province, south of Manila.

Agents from the US Department of Homeland Security and the Philippine Bureau of Immigration nabbed Kenneth Hendricks inside the Cathedral of Our Lady Rosary Parish in Naval town, in Biliran.

"He did not resist arrest," said Senior Superintendent Julius Coyme, the provincial police director.

A report from the immigration bureau said Hendricks had an arrest warrant for a rape complaint filed in Ohio for "engaging in illicit sexual conduct in foreign places".

The complaint was lodged by one of his alleged victims.

Why is Pennsylvania concealing the identities of 11 accused priests?

ALLENTOWN (PA)
The Morning Call

December 5, 2018

By Christine Schiavo

On Monday, the state Supreme Court ruled that the names of the 11 priests who challenged their inclusion in a statewide grand jury report on sexual abuse by 301 priests in the Catholic Church may be kept secret. The report, which was released in August, named accused priests in the six dioceses that the grand jury investigation covered, including Allentown, though nearly all the cases exceeded the statute of limitations for prosecution. The 11 priests argued that disclosing their names would damage their reputations and violate their constitutional right to due process. And the court agreed.

Is the ruling a surprise?
Not really. The court ordered the 11 names temporarily redacted before the report came out in August. During a hearing in September, the judges’ questions provided a glimpse into how they might rule. For example, Justice David Wecht asked why the state didn’t just accept the redacted report as the final version; and Justice Christine Donohue asked why it was necessary to name

Why does the attorney general want to name names?
Attorney General Josh Shapiro said concealing the names would be like ignoring some victims’ accounts. He also has said that the church – sometimes with the help of law enforcement – protected priests and covered up the crimes. Redacting the names, he said, enables those priests to remain in the shadows.

Memo to Hollywood: Get real with movies about real people

ST. PETERSBURG (FL)
Poynter

December 5, 2018

BY Bill MItchell ·

The new movie about Gary Hart’s demise at the hands of the Miami Herald, “The Front Runner,” challenges media scrutiny of the personal lives of politicians as a distraction from what really matters.

Fair enough. I happen to believe the Herald did the right thing with that story, but it’s certainly a topic worthy of the debate the film is provoking.

But here’s a challenge to Hollywood: Isn’t it time you cleaned up your sloppy approach to the fiction embedded in films based on true stories and featuring the names of real people?

I recognize you’re in the entertainment business, not the news business, and that audiences increasingly demand high drama and neatly tied loose ends. It’s the muddling of history that bothers me, and I believe you could do less of that without sacrificing audience engagement.

It’s difficult to imagine a better time than now to pay closer attention to the facts of the matter — focused on real as opposed to imagined history — as we stumble our way through the fog of alternative facts and White House mendacity.

“The Front Runner” has prompted lots of discussion about the relevance of a candidate’s sex life, comparisons with coverage of President Trump’s sexcapades, even the possibility of Hart being set up by a Republican dirty trickster. All good.

But it was the question of what’s real and what’s not that was on my mind as I took my seat in a downtown Boston theater one day last week to watch the new film based on the Herald’s 1987 surveillance of Hart and Donna Rice, the 29 year-old woman he invited to his Capitol Hill townhouse.

Some of the best and worst reflections of the “true story, real people” genre were illustrated with the “Spotlight” movie I viewed three years ago in the same theater. The Oscar-winning account of the Boston Globe’s investigation of clergy sexual abuse managed to capture several Globe staffers with uncanny accuracy. At the same time, it distorted the role of another, Stephen Kurkjian, and unfairly savaged the reputation of a PR guy named Jack Dunn.

Victim Attorney, Diocese of Buffalo Differ on Clergy Abuse Settlements vs. Cash Awards

BUFFALO (NY)
Spectrum News

December 4, 2018

By Mark Goshgarian

More than nine months after the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo announced the creation of an Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program, dozens of cash offers have been made to clergy abuse victims.

An attorney who represents several people who claim abuse at the hands of priests in the diocese stated that he is receiving settlement offers for his clients.

Mitchell Garabedian said eight offers have come in from the compensation program, with amounts ranging from $10,000 to $340,000.

"It's an insult. It's outrageous,” he said. “A re-victimization of my clients. They're adding salt to the wound.”

The voluntary program was designed to help those who've filed claims they were sexually abused as a child at the hands of local clergy.

Program administrators, though selected and paid for by the diocese, are two independent former judges who solely decide the amount based on specific criteria.

Paulist Fathers identify 3 priests accused of sexual abuse of minors

BOSTON (MA)
Boston Globe

December 5, 2018

By Danny McDonald

The Catholic religious order that runs the Paulist Center in Boston said Tuesday that credible allegations of sexual abuse involving minors have been made against three priests who once lived or ministered in the city in years past.

The allegations were made against the Rev. Thomas Dove, the Rev. Robert Michele and the late Rev. Frank M. Sweeney, and involve two females and one male, according to an e-mail sent Tuesday evening by the director of the Paulist Center.

“To the Paulists’ knowledge, these are the only Paulists ever stationed or living in Boston who have had credible allegations raised against them,” the Rev. Michael McGarry wrote in the e-mail sent to members of the Paulist Center community.

The allegation against Dove, now 84, involved a minor female at the Catholic Information Center in Los Angeles, and has only recently “been established and reported to the authorities,” according to the e-mail. He served in LA from 1965 to 1974, the e-mail said.

Dove served in Boston at the Park Street center for one year immediately after he was ordained, from 1961 to 1962, said McGarry. He currently lives at the Paulist House in San Francisco.

In September, a credible and substantiated allegation involving a minor female was made against Michele when he was an associate pastor at a church in Oregon more than 40 years ago, according to McGarry.

Pa. high court says names in redacted grand jury report can’t be released

HARRISBURG (PA)
Catholic News Service

December 5, 2018

In a 6-1 decision Dec. 3, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court said the identities of some clergy accused of abuse that were redacted from a grand jury report issued in mid-August must remain permanently blocked from release.

“We conclude … we must make permanent the redaction of petitioners’ identifying information … as this is the only viable due process remedy we may now afford to petitioners to protect their constitutional rights to reputation,” Justice Debra Todd said.

Lawyers for 24 priests named in the report said their clients fought the release of their identities because they said they “were denied an opportunity to appear before the grand jury to defend themselves, question witnesses, or provide contradictory evidence,” the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported.

“They later argued that the report received so much publicity that it poisoned public opinion against their clients. The only solution, they contended, was to permanently block the names,” it said.

Fallout continues after Diocese bombshell

OSWEGO (NY)
Oswego County News

December 5, 2018

By B. Rae Perryman

After the names of 57 Diocesan clergy linked to child sex abuse were released Monday by Bishop Robert Cunningham, a Diocese of Syracuse spokesperson is denying that parishioner contributions are paying victim’s settlements directly and that the closing of churches in Oswego has “definitely no connection whatsoever” with the scandal.

There are now eleven alleged pedophile priests affiliated with Oswego County parishes.

Oswego priests implicated in credible allegations of child sexual abuse by the Diocese of Syracuse are: Paul A. Brigandi; Daniel W. Casey, Jr.; Francis J. Furfaro; John F. Harrold; James C. Hayes; William A. Lorenz; Chester Misercola; Thomas E. Neary, Jr.; Albert J. Proud; Edward G. Quaid and John M. Zeder.

Monsignors Quaid and Brigandi join the ranks of nine others mentioned identified Tuesday by The Palladium-Times as implicated in a clergy sex abuse lawsuit.

Brigandi succeeded Furfaro as the spiritual leader of St. Joseph’s Church in Oswego and Quaid was the pastor of St. Mary’s in Oswego from 1935 to 1964.

St. Mary’s parishioners reported Tuesday that Quaid’s picture had been removed from the rectory but Quaid remains a lauded figure in St. Mary’s history. The church’s public records note his “outstanding qualities of priestly devotion” were recognized by Pope Pius XII on April 20, 1952 and he was elevated to the rank of Domestic Prelate with the title of Right Reverend Monsignor,” the record says.

The release of the 57 names is another in a long line of faith-shaking events that have pained local Catholics.

Questions about grand jury process shouldn't overshadow findings about predator priests

ALLENTOWN (PA)
The Morning Call

December 4, 2018

By Paul Muschick

A debate may be brewing about the fairness of Pennsylvania’s grand jury process following Monday’s state Supreme Court opinion blocking publication of the names of some priests accused of sexually abusing kids.

Go ahead, have the debate.

But don’t let it become a smokescreen. The focus must remain on the conclusions of the contested grand jury report — that clergy preyed on children for decades, and Catholic church leaders and others didn’t do enough to stop it.

There’s no debate about that.

Many of the allegations in the August grand jury report, which accused hundreds of priests of sexually abusing more than 1,000 children, came directly from the church’s own records — what the grand jury referred to as the “secret archive.” The archive held memos and letters from bishops, clergy and others. While not every priest who was accused of sexual abuse in those records acknowledged it, some did.

Also, more than a dozen priests testified before the grand jury during its two-year investigation. According to the report, “most of them admitted what they had done.”

Grand jury members should be lauded for enduring tough testimony about priest sex abuse
The grand jury investigation identified 301 predator priests. About 270 names were published in the report. Only 11 current and former clergy fought to keep their names out of the report. Don’t let them steal the headlines with their cries about how unfair the grand jury process was.

They raise valid questions about the inability to defend themselves during a one-sided legal process. With the majority of the Supreme Court justices siding with them and allowing their names to be concealed, that could lead to more challenges of the system during future grand jury probes. Defense lawyers have applauded Monday’s ruling, so expect them to run with it.

'Prayer and penance:' More than 78 predator priests in Pa. still paid by Catholic church

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

December 4, 2018

BY Candy Woodall

Decades after their crimes were reported and largely ignored, more than 78 priests accused of child sex abuse are still collecting paychecks and pensions from Pennsylvania dioceses.

Each of those priests has been removed from ministry by Pennsylvania bishops, but the pope himself needs to sign off on all clerics being removed from the priesthood and the payroll.

That process is formally known as laicization, and it can take years or decades, if it happens at all.

The Vatican received 3,400 credible reports of priest abuse from 2004 to 2014, according to church statistics. About 850 priests were defrocked in that period of time for raping or molesting children. The rest were told to repent and ask forgiveness.

Some diocese officials say the Vatican isn't motivated to remove the abusers from the priesthood if they are old or infirm. In other cases, the bishops decide themselves to keep them from being defrocked and allow abusive priests to receive church-funded retirements.

Their final assignment is a life of prayer and penance, a program that cares for priests who raped children and allows them to die with a noble title – a reverend, a father, a retired priest.

Bankruptcy filing provides rare window into church finances

ALBUQUERQUE (NM)
Associated Press

December 5, 2018

New Mexico’s largest Catholic diocese has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in recent months on lawyers to fight claims of clergy sex abuse and to prepare for a potentially lengthy battle in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

The Archdiocese of Santa Fe’s petition for reorganization provides a rare look into the finances of a religious organization that for decades has been wrestling with the financial and social consequences of a scandal that rocked churches across the country.

Archbishop John Wester describes the filing as an equitable thing to do as church reserves dwindle. He says compensating the victims is a top priority.

National watchdog groups and attorneys for victims of clergy sex abuse said Tuesday the archdiocese’s actions suggest otherwise.

They point to the money spent by the archdiocese on lawyers over the last three months and the tens of millions of dollars in real estate that has been transferred to parishes in recent years, effectively reducing the amount of assets held by the archdiocese.

Jesuits to release list on Friday of priests, brothers who were credibly accused of child sex abuse

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
The Advocate

December 4, 2018

By Ramon Antonio Vargas

Leaders of the Jesuit religious order plan to release a list of priests and other members Friday who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse, including those who worked in New Orleans and surrounding areas.

The list, provided by the Jesuits’ U.S. Central and Southern Province, will follow a similar release last month by New Orleans Archbishop Gregory Aymond, which named 57 priests and deacons who allegedly abused minors over the past several decades.

While some Jesuit priests who worked in New Orleans schools and parishes were named by the archdiocese, the order will also provide names of religious brothers and men studying to be Jesuits while teaching locally, which may expand the numbers of alleged abusers Jesuit officials had stationed in the area.

Bishop Persico speaks out

TITUSVILLE (PA)
The Herald

December 5, 2018

By Sean P. Ray

Erie Bishop Lawrence Persico responded to a litany of questions and comments about the sexual abuse scandal that has rocked the Pennsylvania Catholic Church at a public interview at the Edinboro University, Tuesday.

The interview was conducted by Debra Erdley, a reporter from the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, and was part of a series at the university titled “Uncomfortable Conversations.” Erdley has covered the scandal since it was launched by the release of a grand jury report in August, and also previously covered the Jerry Sandusky trial in 2012. Following the one-on-one interview, Persico took questions from the gathered audience.

Erdley began the interview by asking Persico about what moved him to cooperate with the grand jury investigation, breaking ranks with his fellow bishops. Persico was praised by Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro for working closely with the probe, which unveiled numerous accusations of sexual abuse across Pennsylvania. Three priests with ties to Titusville were included in the report, including Monsingor James F. Hopkins, who served at St. Titus church for many years.

Persico said that when he was initially issued the subpoena for church documents in 2016, he asked a law firm to perform an independent investigation into accounts of sexual abuse performed by diocese personnel.

Another priest, Michael Lee Friel, named for first time in child sex abuse lawsuit

GUAM
Pacific Daily News

December 5, 2018

By Haidee V Eugenio

Another former Guam priest, Father Michael Lee Friel, was named for the first time in a lawsuit involving child sexual abuse that happened decades ago, while a second complaint was filed against former Guam priest George Maddock.

The latest lawsuits were filed in the Superior Court of Guam on Wednesday afternoon.

A plaintiff, identified in court documents only as J.Q.G. to protect his privacy, said in his lawsuit that Friel sexually abused him in the sacristy of the San Dionisio Catholic Church in Umatac for about six weeks, in or about 1977.

J.Q.G., represented by Attorney David Lujan, said in his $5 million lawsuit he was around 13 years old at the time the sexual abuses happened.

Update on response from the Diocese of Sioux City

SIOUX CITY (IA)
KTIV TV

December 4, 2018

The Diocese of Sioux City has released an updated statement about the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church. In the statement, the Diocese acknowledges the pain and confusion of parishioners, and is trying to reach out to as many people as possible to answer questions.

The statement indicates the Diocese Review Board has held several meetings to work on what is referred to as a list of credibly-accused priests that will be released to the public.

The four bishops of Iowa are scheduled for a meeting with the State Attorney General and the church continues to respond to emails, calls, and messages from those with concerns.

Meetings with victims are being conducted. In addition, cases are going before the Diocese Review Board, who advises the Bishop on how to move forward with each case.

The Diocese emphasizes there is a zero tolerance policy for sexual abuse. If it is confirmed a priest has committed sexual abuse, that person no longer is allowed to function as a priest.

Anyone who suspects sexual abuse by a member of the clergy can call law enforcement, or the Victims Assistance Coordinator at Mercy Child Advocacy Center, at 1-866-435-4397.


December 4, 2018

Group Calls On Cardinal Daniel DiNardo: ‘Come Clean 100 Percent’

PITTSBURGH (PA)
KDKA-TV

December 4, 2018

A day after a state Supreme Court ruling that the names of 11 accused Roman Catholic clergy should not be made public, a group is calling on Cardinal Daniel DiNardo to be more transparent.

The state grand jury report, released earlier this year, names more than 300 priests statewide accused of abusing children. But 11 names have been redacted.

The state Supreme Court said in the ruling on Monday that revealing those names would violate the state constitutional right of the 11 clergy to have their reputation protected.

Erie Catholic Diocese says they're withholding names of two accused priests from grand jury report

ERIE (PA)
GoErie.com

December 4, 2018

By Lori Wescoat

Court sides with some priests in Pennsylvania abuse report, shields names

The Erie Catholic Diocese responded to reports of two priests' names being redacted from the grand jury report.

Yesterday, we reported that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled the 11 Roman Catholic clergy cited in the grand jury report on sexual abuse could not be made public, saying that releasing the information would have violated the clergymen's state constitutional right to have their reputations protected.

Two of those 11 clergymen were from the Erie Catholic Diocese.

'Prayer and penance:' More than 78 predator priests in Pa. still paid by Catholic church

YORK (PA)
York Daily Record

December 4, 2018

By Candy Woodall

One retirement complex houses more than a dozen priests who sexually assaulted children.

In some cases, requests for them to be defrocked have stalled out awaiting approval by the pope.

Decades after their crimes were reported and largely ignored, more than 78 priests accused of child sex abuse are still collecting paychecks and pensions from Pennsylvania dioceses.

Each of those priests has been removed from ministry by Pennsylvania bishops, but the pope himself needs to sign off on all clerics being removed from the priesthood and the payroll.

That process is formally known as laicization, and it can take years or decades, if it happens at all.

The Vatican received 3,400 credible reports of priest abuse from 2004 to 2014, according to church statistics. About 850 priests were defrocked in that period of time for raping or molesting children. The rest were told to repent and ask forgiveness.

Some diocese officials say the Vatican isn't motivated to remove the abusers from the priesthood if they are old or infirm. In other cases, the bishops decide themselves to keep them from being defrocked and allow abusive priests to receive church-funded retirements.

Their final assignment is a life of prayer and penance, a program that cares for priests who raped children and allows them to die with a noble title – a reverend, a father, a retired priest.

Another priest, Michael Lee Friel, named for first time in child sex abuse lawsuit

GUAM
Pacific Daily News

December 5, 2018

By Haidee V Eugenio

Another former Guam priest, Father Michael Lee Friel, was named for the first time in a lawsuit involving child sexual abuse that happened decades ago, while a second complaint was filed against former Guam priest George Maddock.

The latest lawsuits were filed in the Superior Court of Guam on Wednesday afternoon.

A plaintiff, identified in court documents only as J.Q.G. to protect his privacy, said in his lawsuit that Friel sexually abused him in the sacristy of the San Dionisio Catholic Church in Umatac for about six weeks, in or about 1977.

J.Q.G., represented by Attorney David Lujan, said in his $5 million lawsuit he was around 13 years old at the time the sexual abuses happened.

"After the sixth week of volunteering at the Umatac Parish, J.Q.G. could no longer handle the pain, humiliation, and embarrassment Lee inflicted on him, so he quit going to church and cease volunteering his services," the lawsuit says.

Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court Rules Against Survivors, SNAP Responds

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

December 3, 2018

Today, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled the names of 11 clergy – who were included in the most recent Pennsylvania Grand Jury report but not specifically named – can remain hidden.

This ruling has only made clearer the desperate and immediate need for statute of limitations reform, in Pennsylvania and elsewhere. We know that people who were sexually abused, especially those who were abused as children, are unlikely to report their abuse for many years. As they currently exist, statutes of limitations only prevent justice for the victims that have finally come forward and – as today’s ruling demonstrates – prevents information that might prevent future cases of abuse from getting out.

If bishops in Pennsylvania are serious about their pledges for “full transparency,” they should disclose these names and allegations regardless of the court ruling. There should be a moral imperative to do the right thing, not a legal impetus.

Priest Imprisoned in Nebraska Named in Wheeling List of Accused Priests

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

December 4, 2018

Newly-released records show that a Catholic priest was imprisoned for abusing a Nebraska child, but he has never been “outed” before, as best we can tell. Fr. Paul J. Schwarten spent 18 months in jail for “inappropriate touching of a minor,” according to the Diocese of Wheeling, WV. The disclosure was made last week when Archbishop William Lori released a list of clergy who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors as it pertains to the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People.

Given that this disclosure shows abuse of at least one child in Nebraska ,we hope Nebraska’s bishops will now follow Archbishop Lori’s lead and post their own lists of clergy who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors as it pertains to the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People.

We also hope anyone who may have suffered or seen sexual abuse by a member of the Catholic Church, or suspected sexual abuse by a member of the Church, will end their silence and report what they know, saw or suspect to law enforcement officials. We also hope that Catholic officials in both Nebraska and West Virginia will aggressively seek out other victims, witnesses, whistle blowers – using pulpit announcements, church bulletins and diocesan websites – of Fr. Schwarten and other current or former church employees, no matter where they are from or whether they are alive or deceased.

What happens when Washington Post goes behind scenes of parish ensnared in sexual abuse scandal?

Get Religion

December 4, 2018

By Bobby Ross Jr.

It’s a massive story — the ongoing tremors from the Catholic clergy sex abuse scandals. It’s an impossible subject — for most mere mortal reporters — to tackle in a single shot.

Which is why I was impressed with a recent feature by a Washington Post writer who traveled to Rapid City, S.D. Terrence McCoy, who covers social issues in rural and urban America, produced an exceptional piece of journalism by going small.

Not small as in the length of the piece. No, this was a long feature. But small in terms of focus? Exactly.

McCoy shines a tight spotlight (not to be confused with that other “Spotlight”) on a priest dealing with the fallout from a fellow clergyman’s arrest on a child sex abuse charge. The result: an in-depth news-feature that is full of revealing and relevant details.

It's time for Catholics to demand this from the church

ATLANTA (GA)
CNN

December 3, 2018

By Paul Snyder

The Catholic Church's response to sexual abuse allegations:

Length: 2:45

Editor's Note: Paul Snyder is a Catholic deacon in the Diocese of Buffalo, New York. He is also the Chairman of Snyder Corp., a privately held investment company founded in 1958 with interests in the hospitality, real estate, software and transportation industries, and a Henry Crown Fellow of the Aspen Institute. The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. View more opinion on CNN.

We all regret some decisions in life; for me, it was my choice not to learn Spanish. So, in my search to find the one word that could capture the essence of Pope Francis, it is with much irony that the language of Spain would give me the most appropriate one: Dictablanda!

For those like me who "no hablo espanol," Dictablanda is a Spanish pun for a benevolent dictator. It is also the description that best suits our Holy Father and the Roman Curia. In this instance, it is not a funny pun.

Like many Catholics, I have a sincere love for Pope Francis. Yet I was shocked to learn of the extraordinary restrictions he placed upon the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, on the opening day of their conference last month. It was convened to deal with the catastrophic sex abuse crisis affecting our church.

Specifically, the president of the conference, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, told the bishops, "At the insistence of the Holy See we will not be voting on the two action items." He was referring to a planned vote on a code of conduct, "the first such ethical guidelines for bishops on sex abuse issues, and to establish a lay commission capable of investigating bishops' misconduct," according to The Washington Post.

Attorney: Buffalo diocese offers abuse victims settlements

BUFFALO (NY)
The Associated Press

December 3, 2018

An attorney for alleged victims of clergy sexual abuse says the Roman Catholic Diocese of Buffalo has offered settlements ranging from $10,000 to $340,000.

Boston lawyer Mitchell Garabedian says in a statement Monday that some of the eight victims offered settlements from the diocese’s compensation program want to accept them, while others feel “re-victimized.”

A diocesan spokeswoman didn’t immediately comment.

Also Monday, the Diocese of Syracuse listed 57 priests credibly accused of child sexual abuse. None are in active ministry.

Popular scientist Tyson rejects misconduct allegations

WASHINGTON (DC)
AFP

December 2, 2018

Well-known author and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson on Sunday denied allegations by three women of sexual misconduct spanning several decades.

Tyson, 60, who has built a successful career on television and in his books explaining and popularizing science, had remained largely silent as three different women lodged complaints dating as far back as 1984.

But on Sunday, in a lengthy Facebook post, he responded.

"For a variety of reasons," he wrote, "most justified, some unjustified, men accused of sexual impropriety in today's 'me-too' climate are presumed to be guilty by the court of public opinion."

While calling himself a "loving husband... a scientist and educator," he wrote that "accusations can damage a reputation and a marriage. Sometimes irreversibly."

In the first case, a woman alleged that Tyson drugged and raped her when both were graduate students at the University of Texas in 1984. She has said she remembered passing out after he gave her a drink and waking up later, naked, on his bed.

Church Leader Admits to Knowledge of Abuse by Former Pastor

GRAND RAPIDS (MI)
WXMI

December 3, 2018

The leader of the Church of Carson City, Michigan is responding after alarming allegations of sexual abuse within the church community for decades.

Jesuit High School president: Release of clergy abuse list shows spirit of reconciliation, transparency

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

November 2, 2018

By Jonathan Bullington

The Archdiocese of New Orleans’ decision Friday (Nov. 2) to release a list of 57 area clergy members “credibly accused” of sexually abusing minors was met with support from the leader of Jesuit High School, who said the release was done in the spirit of reconciliation and transparency.

Four people named on the list were at one time employed by the Mid-City high school, including a former president of the school.

“The horrible stories of abuse from the past have given us the task of reconciliation, which, though painful for members of our school community, is the only proper response for Christians,” said the school’s president, the Rev. Christopher S. Fronk, in a letter to the school community.

Pope's accuser returns to accuse brother in inheritance saga

ROME (ITALY)
Associated Press

December 4, 2018

By Nicole Winfield

The retired Vatican ambassador who convulsed the Holy See with accusations of sex abuse cover-up is offering his side of the story in a different scandal: a family fight over a multi-million dollar inheritance.

Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano is trying to explain an Italian court ruling requiring him to pay his brother, who also is a priest, 1.8 million euros. The court's decision generated headlines given Vigano's unprecedented call for Pope Francis to resign over alleged failures in addressing clergy sex abuse.

In a statement Monday, Vigano said his brother had originally sought 40 million euros from their shared inheritance but said that a series of 10 civil, criminal and administrative cases had ruled against him. Vigano accused his brother of subjecting him to a "judicial siege and a veritable defamation campaign in the press."

Thurgauer Katholiken erheben ihre Stimme gegen sexuellen Missbrauch

{Thurgau Catholics raise their voices against sexual abuse}

GERMANY
Tagblatt

November 26, 2018

By Monika Wick

Eine Resolution der Thurgauer Synode verlangt eine umfassende Abklärung sexueller Übergriffe. Kirchenratspräsident Cyrill Bischof und Synodalpräsident Dominik Diezi trafen sich auf einem Podium mit Giorgio Prestele, Präsident des Fachgremiums zu sexuellen Übergriffen der Bischofskonferenz. Prestele erwartet weitere Fälle zu den 311 seit 2010 eingegangenen Meldungen.

«Wenn wir nichts erreichen, laufen uns die Leute davon», gibt ein Mitglied der Synode der Katholischen Landeskirche Thurgau zu bedenken. Auslöser für seine drastische Formulierung sind die sexuellen Übergriffe in der katholischen Kirche, die laut seiner Aussage immer mehr Gläubige als Begründung für ihren Austritt aus der Landeskirche nennen. Im Hinblick auf die Versammlung der Präsidenten der Bischofskonferenzen zum «Schutz von Minderjährigen», die vom 21. bis zum 24. Februar 2019 in Rom stattfindet, hat die Katholische Synode des Kantons Thurgau, das Kirchenparlament, eine Resolution erarbeitet, die sie Diözesanbischof Felix Gmür übergeben wird.

Syracuse diocese releases list of 57 sexually abusive priests

SYRACUSE (NY)
syracuse.com

December 3, 2018

By Julie McMahon

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse today released a list of 57 priests with credible allegations of child sexual abuse against them.

The list includes 38 deceased priests. Nineteen priests are still alive. All of the living priests were previously removed from ministry, the diocese said.

No active priests have credible accusations of child sexual abuse against them, according to the diocese and Onondaga County district attorney.

Officials in September said 85 victims were known to the diocese. Claims against at least 16 of the priests named Monday were reported previously.

The Class of `74: Where are they now?

CHICAGO (IL)
Medium

December 4, 2018

By Pat Navin

May 8, 1974 was an unseasonably cold, gusty and stormy day in Chicago. But inside the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception at St. Mary of the Lake Seminary in northwest suburban Mundelein, the assembled faithful beamed with warmth, pride and a sense of peace. Their sons, grandsons, brothers, nephews, cousins and friends were about to be ordained into the priesthood by John Patrick Cardinal Cody, prelate of the Archdiocese of Chicago, in a ceremony filled with all the pomp and circumstance the institution could muster.

The newly-ordained priests had already received notices of their first parish assignments and they were anxious to make their marks: baptizing babies, ministering to the sick and dying, celebrating the Eucharist, listening to confessions, presiding over weddings and funerals, and, apparently, for at least four of the new priests, sexually abusing boys (and, for one of them, girls as well).

Out of the nearly 100 Diocesan priests in the Chicago Archdiocese who have been credibly accused of abuse according to Bishop-Accountability.org (the Archdiocese puts the number at 65), the class of `74 carries the distinction of having the largest number of accused priests of any single ordination class. Three of the priests — Richard Barry “Doc Bartz, John Walter Calicott and Robert D. Craig — hit the ground running, with credible abuse allegations from their very first parish assignments. The fourth, James Craig Hagan, had not collected any substantiated reports from his first assignment, but made up for lost time at his second parish. Hagan was also the only one of the four who abused both boys and girls.

Their highly edited and redacted files, which became available when the Archdiocese was finally forced to make them public in 2014, include sordid details of abuse and a litany of excuses, cover-ups, reassignments from parish to parish to parish to positions as hospital chaplains or seminary officials. They contain notes from Joseph Cardinal Bernardin, Cody’s successor, and other Archdiocese religious administrators encouraging the abusers’ efforts at self-improvement and offering prayers of support. The files also contain mundane housekeeping notes on how the documented abusers would continue to receive their salaries, status reports on payments for their health insurance, auto insurance and other expenses, and options for future living arrangements.

Catholic church abuse survivors share stories at listening session

PITTSBURGH (PA)
South Hills Community News

December 4, 2018

By Karen Mansfield

Survivors and parishioners stood patiently in a single line at St. Thomas A' Becket Roman Catholic Church in Jefferson Hills to tell their stories and share their anger following the release of the Pennsylvania grand jury report on clergy sexual abuse.

The listening session Dec. 3 was the second of four organized by the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh in an effort to provide a safe place for those in the church, including victims and members of the Catholic community, to begin the healing process.

Bishop David Zubik sat quietly near the altar and listened as survivors recounted details of sexual abuse at the hands of their parish priests.

Jim VanSickle, a survivor of clergy sexual abuse, said he is continuing to heal, 37 years after the abuse and that it negatively impacted his marriage and his relationship with his children.

"I stand here to tell you it's OK. I'm healing. But it's been 37 years," he said.

Names of 11 Catholic priests accused of sexual abuse won't be made public, court says

HARRISBURG (PA)
USA Today

December 4, 2018

By Monica Rhor

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has ruled that the names of 11 priests accused of sexual abuse in a grand jury investigation will not be released.

In Monday's 6-1 decision, the high court said that making the names public would obstruct the right to protect their reputation, which is guaranteed under the state constitution.

A group of former and current priests had argued that they were denied due process because they didn’t have enough time to defend themselves against a grand jury report that came out earlier this year.

The report, which concluded that hundreds of priests had abused children going back more than 70 years, was released with the names of those priests temporarily redacted..

‘Forgiveness is a decision’: Abuse survivor shares journey of healing and faith

DENVER (CO)
Denver Catholic

November 27, 2018

By Moira Cullings

Growing up, Pat was a strong Catholic with a deep passion for her faith.

“I knew all of the responses before Vatican II,” she said. “I knew all of the altar boy responses in Latin. I even knew what they meant.”

That foundation of faith has carried Pat through a remarkable journey of strength and forgiveness. She’s remained in the Church her entire life — despite the abuse she suffered at the hands of a priest at just five years old.

Pat came forward about the abuse in 2002. It took several years, not because she was hesitant to talk about what happened, but because she didn’t remember it.

“I was gifted with repressed memories of the abuse,” said Pat. “I had no [recollection] of it at all until I was 48 years old.”

Psychologists say that repressed memories are unconsciously blocked by the mind because they are connected to a trauma. Although Pat couldn’t remember the experience for decades, its impact lingered. She has dealt with clinical depression her entire life, and, starting in 2001, that depression worsened for a reason she couldn’t place.

The next year, the abuse scandal broke in the Catholic Church and Pat began to realize what had happened to her. While sitting at Mass at Spirit of Christ Catholic Community in Arvada, Pat listened as Monsignor Robert Kinkel, the pastor at the time, read a letter from then-Archbishop of Denver Charles Chaput addressing the scandal.

Massachusetts Catholic deacon claims he was reprimanded for saying prayer for Buffalo deacon

SPRINGFIELD (MO)
The Republican

December 3, 2018

By Shannon Young

David Baillargeon, a deacon at Holy Family Parish Roman Catholic church in Russell, claims he was reprimanded for saying a prayer during Mass on Sunday for a deacon in Buffalo, New York, who has called for the resignation of that diocese's bishop.

Baillargeon spoke out Monday against the church's handling of clergy sexual abuse, arguing that more needs to be done to investigate such cases, including in Western Massachusetts.

Baillargeon, who has worked with activist Olan Horne to advocate for survivors of clergy abuse, said local church officials have largely barred him from preaching after he was critical of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield in a homily two years ago.

The deacon said he faced further pushback Sunday after offering prayers for Buffalo, New York, Deacon Paul Snyder, who has called for Catholic Bishop Richard Malone's resignation.

"After the prayers of petition for the church, I said that I wanted to say a prayer for Deacon Paul Snyder -- told the parishioners where he was and that he was the deacon at St. Mary's Church there -- and that I heard, from my smartphone really, that he had been suppressed from preaching because he spoke out against Bishop Malone and the clergy abuse that's going on there in the Buffalo diocese," Baillargeon said in an interview. "I said, 'We need to pray for him,' and then I raised my hand up and said, 'He's been suppressed for two months.' And, I said, 'Here, your own deacon has been suppressed for two years.'"

PA Attorney General Josh Shapiro Explains Why The Names of Predator Priests Will Remain Secret

PITTSBURGH (PA)
KDKA Radio

December 4, 2018

By Larry Richert and John Shumway

Length: 7:25

Attorney General of Pennsylvania, Josh Shapiro tells listeners that some of the predator priests name will not be released to the public. They also discuss how many investigations are taking place and how many calls have been reported to the abuse hotline. He explains what more is to come.

Bishop Malone needs to tell the truth

BOOTHBAY (ME)
Boothbay Register

November 28, 2018

By Kevin Burnham

We, along with other news agencies in Maine, received word this past week of the investigation into the sexual abuse in the Catholic Church in the Diocese of Buffalo, New York. The State Attorney General ordered the investigation statewide in September and it is learned that the FBI has started its own investigation of the diocese.

Why should that concern us? Well, the Buffalo diocese is under the direction of one Bishop Richard J. Malone, the former Bishop of the Portland Diocese, who came under fire for "not telling the truth" about a case involving the Rev. Thomas M. Lee of Our Lady Queen of Peace in Boothbay Harbor. Lee was accused of sexual abuse dating back decades that spilled out in the early 2000s.

The Buffalo television station, WKBW, contacted this newspaper to see if we had a photograph of Lee to add to its investigative series about the abuse in the Buffalo diocese under Malone. You can find the station's report online at https://bit.ly/2At7ELw

WKBW's thorough investigative report includes an interview with Paul T. Kendrick, an advocate for victims of sexual abuse in the Diocese of Portland. Kendrick was accused of "harassment" by Malone after Kendrick continually asked the bishop to be more transparent about the sexual abuse cases in the Portland diocese.

“The Bishop Malone that I came to know here in Maine...is an actor on a stage,” said Kendrick, during the interview with WKBW. “Malone is a fake, a phony. He’s not telling the truth when he likes to say, ‘I never knew.’”

The report also includes information about the Lee case that the TV station obtained from John S. Brennan, former director of the Office of Professional Responsibility for the Diocese of Portland under Malone. In Brennan's 60-page report on the Lee case, according to the TV station's investigation, "the allegations went nowhere, even after the diocesan review board unanimously affirmed the complaint against Father Lee had been substantiated."

Catholic Dioceses See Litigation Uptick in Wake of Grand Jury Sex-Abuse Report

UNITED STATES
Legal Intelligencer

December 3, 2018

By Max Mitchell

A wave of lawsuits against Catholic dioceses has gained momentum in Pennsylvania courts and beyond in the wake of the explosive grand jury report on sexual abuse, and the state Senate’s failure to create a window for survivors in the statute of limitations has not held it back.

The legislative effort, which had been mounted in the wake of a groundbreaking grand jury report outlining more than 70 years of abuse at numerous Catholic dioceses across the state, had garnered bipartisan support, and many survivors said they were hopeful that, after several failed attempts to open a litigation window for survivors, they would finally have their day in court. But the measure was bottled up in the state Senate.

The tide of litigation was not stemmed, however.

In the past few weeks, a dozen suits have been filed against the Roman Catholic Diocese of Pittsburgh, 20 suits were filed against a Connecticut diocese, two class action suits were filed in federal court against the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, and many other individual actions have been filed against dioceses in Pennsylvania and across the country. The suburban Philadelphia law firm Hamburg, Rubin, Mullin, Maxwell & Lupin even set up a team of lawyers to focus on representing alleged victims.

Several attorneys who spoke with The Legal said they are seeing a renewed interest in sex abuse claims. The interest, they said, is fueled in large part by the grand jury report, as well as changing attitudes toward victims and newly uncovered evidence that might provide a broader basis for claims to circumvent the statute of limitations.

Attorney: Buffalo Diocese "Does Not Care and Will Never Care"

BUFFALO (NY)
Spectrum News

December 4, 2018

An attorney who represents several people who claim abuse at the hands of priests in the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo stated that he is receiving settlement offers for his clients.

Mitchell Garabedian says eight offers have come in from the Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program, with dollar amounts ranging from $10,000 to $340,000.

Garabedian says that while some of his clients want to accept the offers, others feel re-victimized by them:

"All eight clergy sexual abuse victims feel as though the Catholic Church still does not care and will never care about the pain caused by clergy sexual abuse."

The diocese disputes the term "settlement," instead calling it compensation to promote healing and bring closure.

Hollywood's #MeToo Crisis Won't Subside Until the Industry Is Rebuilt

LOS ANGELES (CA)
Hollywood Reporter

November 30, 2018

By Maureen Ryan

During the past year, individuals have learned a lot, but institutions haven’t changed at all. So the guilds have to step up.
For the past year, those who work in the entertainment and media industries have been deluged with stories about harassment, toxicity, assault and rape on sets, in offices, in hotels rooms and just about everywhere else. These stories are hard to read. “Gut-churning” doesn’t quite cover it.

Unfortunately, that was the easy part. Changing Hollywood culture is going to be much, much harder.

I don’t say that lightly. I reported some of these stories over the past year, and hearing the fear in the voices of the men and women I talked to was harrowing. Listening to competent, hard-working professionals recount story after story of abuses of power that were covered up, denied or explained away altered my outlook on a fundamental level.

It convinced me that this work is just beginning. What the industry needs to do now is move beyond reading the latest exhaustive report about this or that individual and stop assuming that things will change if we take out a few bad apples.

Folks, the whole barrel of apples is rotten. It needs to be washed out and refilled from the bottom up.

‘This is why children get abused’: Watch head of CHILD USA go off on Trump’s Labor Secretary Alex Acosta

WASHINGTON (DC)
Raw Story

December 3, 2018

By Bob Brigham

Leading legal scholar and child advocate Marci Hamilton went off on Donald Trump’s Labor Secretary during a Monday evening appearance on The Rachel Maddow Show.

Maddow said that “The Miami Herald deserves congratulations for its fairly epic new reporting on Trump’s Labor Secretary, Alex Acosta, and specifically on the deal that he struck when he was a U.S. Attorney with a very rich, very well connected, very prolific serial sex offender.”

“Despite local police uncovering allegations of straight-up child rape and the FBI identifying dozens of victims, Alex Acosta struck a ‘no prosecution agreement’ in the Jeffrey Epstein case in Florida,” Maddow noted. “He struck a deal with Epstein that made Epstein immune from prosecution for federal crimes.”

Law professor Marci Hamilton, the CEO and Academic Director at CHILD USA, joined Maddow to discuss the scandal.

Delbarton’s Catholic order takes attorney to court for revealing alleged sex assault victim got 7-figure settlement

MORRISTOWN (NJ)
NJ Advance Media

December 3, 2018

By Thomas Moriarty

A New Jersey lawyer is scheduled to stand trial this week in a lawsuit accusing him of telling others generally how much a Catholic order paid an alleged victim of sexual abuse.

The Order of St. Benedict claims Gregory Gianforcaro breached a confidentiality clause in a 1988 settlement with the order when he told reporters the Catholic order paid a seven-figure sum to resolve the sexual abuse allegations.

Gianforcarlo’s trial was scheduled to begin Monday before Superior Court Judge Rosemary E. Ramsay in Morristown, court records show.

The Order, which operates the Delbarton School in Morristown, has been a defendant in multiple lawsuits brought by former students who allege monks sexually abused them while they attended the school.

Rep. Jackie Speier shares her horrific childhood ordeal

SAN FRANCISCO (CA)
KGO TV

December 3, 2018

By Cheryl Jennings

ABC 7 News Anchor Cheryl Jennings recently had an exclusive interview with Congresswoman Jackie Speier of San Mateo County. They talked about the Congresswoman's new book, "Undaunted", in which she shares some very difficult things about her life.

Speier reveals a horrific childhood ordeal.

And, she goes into detail about what happened to her at the Jonestown Massacre 40 years ago, in Guyana. The leader of a cult ordered the deaths of 900 people. Speier was shot multiple times and left for dead. She was included in a recent documentary Jonestown on ABC. While she was describing the contents of the book, Speier began to slowly describe what happened when she was just a child.

Jackie Speier: "When I was a young girl, my grandfather molested me. And it took me years to tell my mother.
Cheryl Jennings: "It was her father?"
Jackie Speier: It was my father's father. And I had just basically put it away.
Cheryl Jennings: "How old were you.
Jackie Speier: "You know, I think i was maybe five, six, seven.
Cheryl Jennings: "So this is a recovered memory.
Jackie Speier: "Yes."

Archdiocese of Santa Fe files bankruptcy petition

ALBUQUERQUE (NM)
Albuquerque Journal

December 4, 2018

By Colleen Heild

The Archdiocese of Santa Fe, as expected, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday under the weight of civil litigation alleging decades of clergy sexual abuse of children and the failure of church officials to prevent such abuse.

The filing comes after the archdiocese has settled nearly 300 claims of child sexual abuse by Catholic clergy, according to the Santa Fe Archdiocese in a recent website posting. The number of pending sex abuse cases listed in the filing is 36.

The archdiocese’s petition for reorganization shows:

• An estimated $3.7 million in liabilities, although elsewhere in the petition the total estimated liability is from $10 million to $50 million.

• Creditors with the 20 largest unsecured claims are clergy sex abuse claimaints who are listed according to their initials, and their lawyers in Santa Fe and Albuquerque; the petition estimates each claim at $100,000.

• The total of all archdiocese assets was listed as $49 million, including real estate with an estimated value of $31.5 million.

• More than $57 million in property is being held in trust for the dozens of parishes in the archdiocese; more than $34 million in property transfers to parishes occurred in the past two years.

Archbishop of Santa Fe John C. Wester announced the decision to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy last Thursday in Albuquerque. (Jim Thompson/Albuquerque Journal)

Archbishop John C. Wester said he decided to file for reorganization to ensure that all claims of child abuse survivors, including those who come forward in the future, can be settled “fairly and equitably.”

West Virginia Diocese Publishes List of Priests Accused of Sexual Abuse

WHEELING (WV)
World Religion News

December 3, 2018

By Gary Nguyen

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of West Virginia released the names of clergy who are accused of multiple child sexual abuse crimes. Some cases date back to the 1950s.

According to the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, among the 18 clergy members mentioned in the list, 11 of them have died. No one in the list is actively ministering to constituents.

s per the West Virginia Roman Catholic archdiocese, the public release of names pertains to the 2002 U.S. bishops’ approved "Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People." The move is in accordance with the policy adopted by the diocese on matters of sexual abuse since 1985.

Church owes millions to 29 men with whom it reached out-of-court settlements

NEW BRUNSWICK (CANADA)
CBC

December 4, 2018

By Gabrielle Fahmy

Victims of abuse by Catholic priests in New Brunswick have been waiting almost three years for compensation after reaching out-of-court settlements, and there is no sign the money will arrive anytime soon.

CBC News has learned as many as 29 sexual abuse victims have reached tentative settlements in their civil lawsuits against the archdiocese of Moncton, N.B.

These are men who did not participate in the conciliation process led by the archdiocese between 2012 and 2014, but rather chose to sue the church on their own.

But the Moncton archdiocese said it handed over $10.6 million to compensate 109 sexual abuse victims who came forward during the conciliation process. It has been locked in a legal battle with its insurance company over who should compensate victims of sexual abuse for years.

Many of these tentative settlements at issue were reached after closed-door meetings in early 2016.

"They said they were going to try getting our money as soon as possible within a year," said a 54-year-old Moncton man. Because he is a victim of sexual abuse, CBC News has agreed not to reveal his identity.

Victim advocate: Releasing names of accused priests good start, but more needs to be done

SYRACUSE (NY)
CNYCentral

December 3, 2018

It's a wound on the Catholic Diocese of Syracuse that will not heal anytime soon — many priests credibly accused of child sexual abuse.

On Monday, the diocese released the names of 57 priests in the local area with accusations that go back to 1950 in hopes of moving past the conversation of abuse in the Catholic Church that has been in the national spotlight since this summer's investigation by the attorney general's office of Pennsylvania, which claims more than 1,000 children where abused by more than 300 "predator priests" in Pennsylvania.

"It was smart to release the names," said parishioner Bill Kinne. "We've go to pray and hope this will help heal and get over it."

For years, many have pushed for the names to be made public. Bishop Robert Cunningham said he decided to release the names after much reflection and prayer.

And even though the list of names is shocking, some say it might not even be half of the clergy who offended.

"Every parish probably had a perpetrator and that every Catholic in their lifetime attending church in the Diocese of Syracuse probably ran into a perpetrator," said victim advocate Patrick Wall.

Holy Innocents Catholic School sued over allegation of sexual abuse

WAITE PARK (MN)
Saint Cloud Times

December 3, 2018

By Jordyn Brown and Nora G. Hertel

A former student at Holy Innocents Catholic School in Waite Park filed a lawsuit against the school Monday alleging sexual abuse by five members of the family that runs the school and a former priest who was assigned and lived there for years.

The woman is calling the school a "public nuisance" and is asking for it to be permanently shut down.

A copy of the lawsuit filed by Jeff Anderson and Associates, the law firm representing the woman, says she endured "ritual sexual abuse" while she was a student at Holy Innocents from 1978 to 1984, when she was 5 to 11 years old. Only the school is named as a defendant.

December 3, 2018

Reported victim and former priest speak out after list of accused priests is made public

COLUMBUS (OH)
WSYX/WTTE TV

December 3, 2018

By Seema Iyer

When the Steubenville Diocese released its list of priests accused of sex abuse it left many people having to relive what they would rather forget.

Beth Rocker was between 10 and 12 years old when she says former priest Gary Zalenski - whose name was on that list - began molesting her. Rocker says it started in the early 1990's after she and her brother brother became altar servers at their church, Saint Peter and Paul in Lore City, Ohio.

“He would come up behind me and squeeze my chest or from the front squeeze my chest, I'd feel his penis be hard pushing up against me," Rocker said.

Zalenski disputes the claim, saying there weren’t any female altar servers during the five years he was there and he provided five letters that essentially say as much.

Rocker said another incident with Zalenski happened on a day she thought she'd spending time hanging with a big group of friends from church, but ended up on Zalenski's boat with just him and her younger brother.

She says Zalenski told her to get on his lap to drive the boat and then “he opened his legs and I sat down in between his legs and then his penis got hard and then my backside got wet and then I got up and we jumped off the boat.”

Rocker says she and her brother both jumped off the boat into the lake because she was scared and was trying to think of a way to get out of the situation.

Pa. Supreme Court: Names of Catholic clergy will remain shielded

HARRISBURG (PA)
Philadelphia Inquirer

December 3, 2018

By Angela Couloumbis and Liz Navratil

As the Catholic Church undergoes a national reckoning for its handling of the clergy sex abuse scandal, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Monday ruled it would not release the identities of 11 clerics implicated in a high-profile grand jury investigation of such abuse in nearly every diocese in the state.

In its majority opinion, the high court sided with a group of former and current clergy who claimed that passages in a state grand jury report, released earlier this year, are either inaccurate or unfairly harm their reputations.

The report, the result of a two-year investigation by the state Attorney General's office, chronicled seven decades worth of abuse in six out of the state's eight dioceses. Its public release this past August sparked a wave of similar state and federal investigations across the country as well as the resignation of one of the nation's top Catholic leaders.

"We acknowledge that this outcome may be unsatisfying to the public and to the victims of the abuse detailed in the report," wrote Justice Debra Todd, who authored the majority opinion. "While we understand and empathize with these perspectives, constitutional rights are of the highest order, and even alleged sexual abusers, or those abetting them, are guaranteed by our Commonwealth's Constitution the rights of due process."

Some churches talk about archdiocese sexual misconduct report at Mass

NORFOLK (NE)
Norfolk Daily News

December 3, 2018

Some churches in the Catholic Archdiocese of Omaha used time before and during Mass on Sunday to react to the recent revelation of 38 past clergy members being accused of sexual misdeeds with minors.

The archdiocese announced Friday that “substantiated claims of sexual abuse of, or sexual misconduct with, a minor” had been made against 34 priests and four deacons on a list it provided to Nebraska Attorney General Doug Peterson, who had asked for the information.

The files go back to 1978, as requested by the attorney general. Only a few of the accused have faced criminal charges or civil lawsuits. None of the individuals named are currently active or serving in Omaha Archdiocese parishes, which include those in Northeast Nebraska.

At Sacred Heart Parish in Norfolk, no mention was made of the latest report during Masses on Saturday evening at St. Mary’s Catholic Church.

No child should be able to get married before she can get a driver’s license

DENVER (CO)
The Colorado Sun

December 2, 2018

By Diane Carman

I’m trying to imagine a Colorado bank approving a 30-year home mortgage for a 15-year-old. Or an agency authorizing an adoption of an infant by a 14-year-old. Or a 13-year-old hiring a divorce attorney.

OK, those images are absurd. After all, you have to be 16 to get a driver’s license, 18 to vote.

And yet, in Colorado and 17 other states, children can be legally married to a man or woman over 21. Since 2006, at least 2,240 marriage licenses were issued in Colorado to couples where at least one person was under 18, many 15 years old or younger.

In so many ways, that’s not just absurd, it’s unconscionable.

“In terms of the whole development of the brain, adolescence is such an important time,” said Joanne Belknap, professor of criminology and social justice at the University of Colorado Boulder. “It’s the time when we are determining who we are outside of our parents and what our beliefs are versus those of everyone around us.”

It’s when we begin to establish what is trendily referred to as “agency.”

St. Columbkille in Papillion to rename Steinhausen Center after substantiated allegation

OMAHA (NE)
Omaha World-Herald

December 3, 2018

By Kevin Cole

Some churches in the Catholic Archdiocese of Omaha used time before and during Mass on Sunday to react to the revelation of 38 clergy members being accused of sexual misdeeds with minors.

The archdiocese announced Friday that “substantiated claims of sexual abuse of, or sexual misconduct with, a minor” had been made against 34 priests and four deacons on a list it provided to Nebraska Attorney General Doug Peterson, who had asked for the information. The files go back to 1978, as requested by the attorney general. Only a few of the accused have faced criminal charges or civil lawsuits.

At St. Columbkille in Papillion, the Rev. Dave Reeson told church members that the Steinhausen Center will be renamed because the Rev. Robert O. Steinhausen was named in the report. Steinhausen died in 1993 at age 70 after 21½ years at the helm of St. Columbkille.

The archdiocese received a substantiated allegation against Steinhausen in 2008, after his death, said Deacon Tim McNeil, chancellor of the archdiocese.

He said the archdiocese considers an allegation substantiated when it is supported by sufficient evidence or information, leading archdiocesan officials to believe that the claim is true.

A second allegation was made against Steinhausen, but the information was received third-hand and couldn’t be substantiated, McNeil said.

Diocese program offers sex abuse victim $35,000 to settle claim

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

December 3, 2018

By Jay Tokasz

Administrators of a program to compensate childhood victims of clergy sex abuse have made at least one settlement offer – to a man who accused a Buffalo Diocese priest of molesting him in a church rectory.

The man was offered $35,000 to settle his abuse claim and agree to not sue the Buffalo Diocese, said the man’s attorney, Kevin Stocker.

Stocker described the offer as insulting.

“It’s tough to put a value on wrecking peoples’ lives and wrecking their families’ lives, but I know it’s not $35,000,” Stocker said.

It appears to be one of the first offers made. The News spoke last week with more than a dozen victims and attorneys who represent victims – all of whom said they had not yet received offers. Some victims and attorneys said they had yet to meet with the administrators of the program, and they expressed frustration over how long the process is taking.

Norwich Diocese faces 20 new lawsuits for alleged abuse at Mount Saint John facility for troubled teens

NORWICH (CT)
Hartford Courant

November 28, 2018

By Dave Altimari

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Norwich is facing 20 lawsuits filed this week alleging abuse of teenage students at The Academy at Mount Saint John, a Deep River residential treatment center, in the 1990s.

The lawsuits were filed by Hartford attorney Patrick Tomasiewicz, alleging students were abuse at the hands of at least four staff members, although the majority of the allegations were against two now-deceased brothers.

The academy used to be a residential boarding school where the state Department of Children and Families and the juvenile courts referred minors. A number of similar lawsuits have previously been filed against the facility.

It is now called The Connecticut Transition Academy for students with special needs and is no longer a boarding school. Students are referred from any school district in the state. The diocese still oversees the academy.

“We represent a lot of people that were harmed and we are going to do our best for them,” Tomasiewicz said.

Norwich diocese faces lawsuits claiming sex abuse at school

HARTFORD (CT)
The Associated Press

November 28, 2018

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Norwich, Connecticut, is facing 20 lawsuits stemming from allegations of sexual abuse during the 1990s at a residential boarding school for minors.

Attorney Patrick Tomasiewicz filed the lawsuits this week, claiming teenage students at The Academy at Mount St. John in Deep River were sexually abused by two now-deceased brothers.

The lawsuits say that the victims were between 13 and 15 years old and that the abuse occurred between 1990 and 1996.

Minors used to be referred to the treatment facility by the state Department of Children and Families and juvenile courts. It has since become an academy for students with special needs. It’s still overseen by the diocese.

A look back at Owen Labrie’s sex assault case he continues his appeal process

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Daily News

November 28, 2018

By Rachel DeSantis

Owen Labrie, the former New Hampshire prep school student convicted on felony charges that stemmed from a rape allegation, is headed back to court Wednesday as he continues to fight for a new trial.

The 23-year-old Labrie will reportedly argue that his legal team was ineffective in defending him against “certain uses of computer services prohibited,” of which he was found guilty in August 2015.

It was Labrie’s only felony conviction (he was found guilty of four misdemeanors, including sexual assault), but it came with a lifetime on the sex offender registry.

Labrie was 18 and a student at the prestigious St. Paul’s School in Concord, N.H. in May 2014 when he sexually assaulted a 15-year-old freshman girl as part of an alleged school ritual in which seniors compete to sleep with the most underclassmen.

News Release – Syracuse, NY

SYRACUSE (NY)
Jeff Anderson & Associates

December 3, 2018

[Note: Correction to News Release Regarding Diocese of Syracuse’s Release of 57 Names of Credibly Accused Priests: (Syracuse, New York) – An earlier press release identified a Father Thomas Trane as working at St. Adam’s parish in Oswego, NY. Neither this individual nor this parish exist. These names are fictitious names used in court filings. The true identities of the parties and location of these allegations are unknown.]

Diocese of Syracuse Releases List of 57 Names of Priests Credibly Accused of Child Sexual Abuse

Attorneys, abuse survivors, call on Bp. Cunningham and the New York bishops to release all information and histories on every credibly accused priest

(Syracuse, New York) – Today, the Diocese of Syracuse released a list of names of 57 priests with credible allegations of sexual abuse of a minor. Until today, Bishop Robert J. Cunningham has refused to release the list of names of credibly accused priests. As former Bishop of the Diocese of Ogdensburg and after working as Chancellor and Vicar General in the Diocese of Buffalo for nearly two decades, Bp. Cunningham stated on Saturday that he had concluded that not releasing the names had become a “roadblock” to the local Church.

“We applaud any time a diocese comes clean with long-held, dangerous secrets, yet this release is still a half measure and not the full truth,” said Attorney Jeff Anderson who represents several sexual abuse survivors in the Diocese of Syracuse and across New York. “We know, in having scrutinized the practices of Bishop Cunningham and his predecessor, that there are more names. The histories and concealment of these offenders, by the officials in the diocese, also needs to be made public. It’s time for the full truth.”

On March 14, 2018 the law firm of Jeff Anderson & Associates released a report detailing the names and histories of 19 priests in the Diocese of Syracuse who were accused of sexually abusing minors. One of these priests, Fr. Thomas Trane, was not included in the Diocese’s release today even though Fr. Trane was sued for sexually abusing a child from approximately 1988 to 1989 at St. Adam’s parish in Oswego, NY.

For former Pittsburgh prosecutor, the new inquiry into clergy abuse is personal

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Religion News Service/USA Today

November 29, 2018

The suspicious looks were one thing, but the whispers are what David Hickton remembers from the Sunday mornings two years ago when he would rise from his pew at SS. Simon & Jude to receive Holy Communion.

“I could hear the ‘tsk, tsk, tsk’ while I was going up the aisle,” he says. “Others were muttering, ‘Of all the nerve!'”

Hickton – then the chief federal prosecutor in western Pennsylvania known for his landmark indictment in 2014 of Chinese military hackers for stealing trade secrets from state institutions such as U.S. Steel – had just revealed his new target: the Catholic Church.

The former altar boy from working-class Castle Shannon put the full weight of the federal government behind an incendiary theory that the Altoona-Johnstown Diocese should be viewed as an interstate criminal enterprise – akin to the Mafia – based on allegations that for years, up to 50 priests had abused hundreds of children.

The inquiry, which cast him as a traitor to some in his own congregation, was resolved far short of a dramatic courtroom confrontation when the federal government and the diocese agreed last year to create an outside panel to guard child safety.

SNAP Calls For 3rd-Party Investigation

MORRISTOWN (TN)
The Citizen Tribune

November 29, 2018

By Ken Little

A group of survivors of priest abuses is continuing calls for a third party to investigate the Catholic Church and allegations against priests.

Former Priest Willam Casey is among four former pastors at Notre Dame Catholic Church in Greeneville listed among 13 priests and former priests accused or convicted of sexually abusing a minor.

The list was released Nov. 2 by the Diocese of Nashville.

The Survivors Network of those Abused by Priestsgroup claims there are more names not yet made public, an allegation that the Diocese of Nashville has refuted.

East Tennessee SNAP advocate Susan Vance said this week that an independent, third-party investigation of the Catholic Church in Tennessee needs to he conducted in order to get all the facts.

Nine of the 13 priests and former priests on the list released by the diocese are dead. Two others, including Casey, are in prison. None are in active ministry, the Diocese of Nashville said in a news release.

Diocese says Iowa priest who threatened rape has recovered

IOWA CITY (IA)
CRUX

November 28, 2018

By Ryan J. Foley

A Catholic diocese on Wednesday defended its decision to continue employing a priest who told police he was trying to rape a woman when he was arrested naked in an Iowa mall in 2013.

The Diocese of Sioux City issued a statement for the first time acknowledging the 5-year-old incident involving Father Jeremy Wind, calling it a “mental health episode” from which he recovered with the help of medication and treatment. The diocese gave no details about what occurred and told parishioners the scrutiny was unfortunate and unnecessary because “there is nothing newsworthy to report.”

The statement came in response to inquiries from The Associated Press, which used the state’s open records law to shed light on a criminal case that was recently erased from public court files. It marks the latest diocese personnel matter that has come under scrutiny since its acknowledgment in October to having kept quiet a priest’s 1986 admission to sexually abusing roughly 50 boys.

Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston releases names of 31 accused priests

WHEELING (WV)
WTRF

November 29, 2018

By Sam Coniglio

Catholic dioceses across the country are coming clean after yet another abuse scandal has rocked the Church.

The Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston has gone public as well, as they have released the names of 31 priests with credible accusations against them of abuse.

“We hope the release of this list,” said Archbishop William E. Lori, Apostolic Administrator for the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston, “will be one of many steps taken to restore trust with parishioners and the broader community in West Virginia. We hope people see the release of this list as a sign of good faith that the diocese is committed to transparency, accountability and to providing a safe environment for children and adults."

The list released by the Diocese dates back to the 1950s. In its review, the Diocese says that they reviewed more than 2,000 files of about 800 priests, which in total contained tens of thousands of documents.

Be celibate or leave the priesthood, pope tells gay priests

VATICAN CITY
Reuters

December 2, 2018

By Philip Pullella

Men with deep-rooted homosexual tendencies should not be admitted to the Catholic clergy, and it would be better for priests who are actively gay to leave rather than lead a double life, Pope Francis says in a new book.

While he has previously spoken of the need for better screening of candidates for the religious life, his comments suggesting that priests who cannot keep their vows of celibacy should leave are some of his clearest to date.

Francis made the comments in a book-length interview with Spanish priest Fernando Prado called "The Strength of Vocation", in which he discusses the challenges of being a priest or nun today.

Francis said in the book that homosexuality in the Church "is something that worries me". It is due to be published this week in several languages. An advance copy of the Italian version was made available to Reuters.

"The question of homosexuality is a very serious one," he said, adding that those entrusted with training men to be priests must be certain that candidates are "humanly and emotionally mature" before they can be ordained.

Missbrauch: Norbert Denef fordert eine Million Euro

[abuse: Norbert Denef calls for one million euros]

GERMANY
Leipziger Volkszeitung

November 29, 2018

By Mathias Schönknecht

Norbert Denef wurde als Kind von einem Pfarrer in Delitzsch über Jahre missbraucht. Der 69-Jährige sagt: „Das Bistum Magdeburg trägt Schuld an meiner Krebserkrankung“ und fordert eine Million Euro.

Der in Delitzsch geborene Norbert Denef wurde als Kind jahrelang von einem katholischen Pfarrer missbraucht. Als erstes deutsches Opfer bekam er eine finanzielle Entschädigung – 25 000 Euro. Jetzt geht sein Kampf gegen die Kirche weiter.

La Iglesia mantuvo en activo a un cura condenado por distribuir pornografía infantil

[Church allowed priest convicted of distributing child pornography to stay active]

MADRID (SPAIN)
El País

November 25, 2018

La diócesis de Cáceres permitió a un sacerdote sentenciado a prisión por corrupción de menores coordinar catequesis dirigidas a personas con discapacidad

La diócesis de Coria-Cáceres permitió a un cura condenado por corrupción de menores coordinar catequesis dirigidas a personas con discapacidad. El sacerdote Ignacio Lajas Obregón fue sentenciado en 2004 a 16 meses de prisión por distribuir pornografía infantil por la red. No ingresó en la cárcel por tratarse de una pena inferior a dos años y carecer de antecedentes. Y continuó en activo tras el fallo judicial, según tres boletines de la diócesis de Coria-Cáceres.

Jetzt offiziell: Bischof vertuschte vor seiner Amtszeit Missbrauch

[Now officially: Bishop hushed up abuse before his term in office]

GERMANY
lnw

November 29, 2018

SKANDAL SCHOCKIERT NRW-KATHOLIKEN

Rhede. Für manche war er der gute Seelsorger, andere machte er zu sexuellen Opfern – und wurde dabei gedeckt von Münsters späterem Bischof. Ein Jahre zurückliegender Missbrauchsskandal schockiert die Katholiken in NRW und wirft wieder die Frage nach mehr Macht für Frauen auf.

Die beiden Hauptpersonen sind nicht da. Beide längst tot. Es geht um Münsters 2013 verstorbenen Bischof Reinhard Lettmann und einen pädophilen Priester, der 1971 nach früheren Verfehlungen in die Kirchengemeinde nach Rhede versetzt wurde. Dort missbrauchte er erneut Kinder und Jugendliche. Auch im Ferienlager, wie Zeugen jetzt dem Bistum berichtet haben. Und das, obwohl die Bistumsleitung von der Vorgeschichte des Mannes wissen musste. Zur Leitung gehörte der damalige Generalvikar und spätere Bischof Lettmann. Als der jetzige stellvertretende Generalvikar des Bistums, Jochen Reidegeld, am Dienstagabend bei einer Informationsveranstaltung bei den Opfern im Namen des Bischofs um Vergebung bittet, ist ihm die Scham und Betroffenheit anzusehen. Reidegeld kämpft mit den Tränen. Von Versagen ist die Rede. Seine katholische Kirche müsse jetzt endlich die Strukturen zerschlagen, die das jahrzehntelange Vertuschen erst möglich gemacht haben. Reidegeld redet von Männerbünden und fordert, dass jetzt möglichst schnell Frauen Ämter übernehmen müssten. "Und da will ich nicht mehr hören, dass die Kirche dafür noch Generationen braucht", sagte der Vertreter des Bistums. Es müsse jetzt geschehen.

Warum der Regensburger Bischof den Medien Verleumdung der katholischen Kirche vorwirft

[Why the bishop of Regensburg accuses the media of defamation of the Catholic Church]

GERMANY
regensburg-digital.de

November 29, 2018

A commentary by Alfred Gassner, Regensburg

Zu Bischof Voderholzers Rede vom „Missbrauch des Missbrauchs“

Ende Oktober hat sich der Regensburger Bischof Voderholzer mit einer Predigt an sein Kirchenvolk gewandt. Anlass war die MHG-Studie, „die uns als Kirche von Regensburg in den letzten Wochen arg zugesetzt und viele Gläubige stark verunsichert“ habe. Wie schon sein Vorgänger unterstellt der Regensburger Bischof Medien und Kritikern ein politisches Kalkül und greift dabei sogar auf die reaktionäre und täterschützende Floskel vom Missbrauch mit dem Missbrauch zurück.
Unser Gastautor Alfred Gassner antwortet Voderholzer. Er ist Jahrgang 1939, wurde 1950 Seminarschüler im Studienseminar St. Augustin in Weiden und musste dort sexuelle Übergriffe durch einen Kleriker erleiden. Mit der Begründung, er sei eine moralische Gefahr für die Mitschüler und das Ansehen des Hauses, wurde Gassner des Seminars verwiesen. In die MHG-Studie ist der „Fall Gassner“ nicht eingeflossen, weil der übergriffige Kleriker nicht im Auftrag des Bistums sondern nur für seinen Orden arbeitete.

Voderholzer: Medien und Strafanzeige erstattende Professoren wollen Kirche verleumden

In seiner Predigt zur Wolfgangs-Woche 2018 verteidigt Bischof Voderholzer den katholischen Pflichtzölibat für Priester und damit das katholischen Herrschaftssystem und dessen Eigengesetzlichkeit: er spricht das sexuelle Enthaltsamkeitsgebot für Priester von jeder Ursächlichkeit für das kirchliche Missbrauchsdilemma frei. Die Medien und die Strafanzeige erstattenden Professoren würden das Missbrauchsthema instrumentalisieren, um die Kirche zu verleumden und ihr zu schaden.

Missbrauch an Schutzbefohlenen ist ein kriminelles Dreiecksgeschehen: den Opfern treten nicht nur die pervers handelnden Täter als Einzelpersonen zu nahe, sondern auch die institutionelle Kirche als Mittäterin, deren tatenloses Zuschauen die strafbaren Aktionen der Täter ja erst ermöglicht hatte.

Nicolás Castellanos: “Los casos de pederastia no se pueden silenciar”

[Nicolás Castellanos: "Cases of pedophilia can not be silenced"]

PALENCIA (SPAIN)
El País

December 1, 2018

By Julio Nuñez

El obispo emérito de Palencia, misionero en Bolivia y Premio Príncipe de Asturias a la Concordia, subraya que la Iglesia tiene que ser transparente y reconocer los casos con todas las consecuencias

El agustino Nicolás Castellanos (Mansilla del Páramo, León, 1935) saltó a los medios en 1991 después de presentar su renuncia como obispo de Palencia a Juan Pablo II para irse de misionero a Bolivia con la Fundación Hombres Nuevos, trabajo que le fue reconocido con el premio Príncipe de Asturias a la Concordia en 1998. Su espíritu incansable y amistoso también incluye un discurso crítico contra los sectores ricos de la Iglesia que “viven en los palacios”, los que no miran hacia el “pueblo de Dios” y hacia los que no reconocen “los pecados” cometidos por la Iglesia, como la pederastia. Durante el desempeño de su trabajo episcopal (1978-1991) asegura que jamás recibió una denuncia por abusos y que tampoco se habló de ese tema durante las reuniones de obispos en la Conferencia Episcopal Española. Al llevar 27 años fuera de España, prefiere no opinar la línea de respuesta sobre los casos de pederastia que está llevando a cabo la cúpula eclesiástica española, pero subraya que el camino a seguir es el mismo que se ha hecho en países como Alemania y Chile.

Missbrauch in der Kirche: „Die Debatte ist stark männlich geprägt“

[Abuse in the Church: "The debate is strongly masculine"]

GERMANY
Vatican News

November 2018

Die Missbrauchsdebatte in der Kirche ist stark männlich geprägt. Das hält die langjährige Präventionsbeauftragte im Erzbistum Hamburg, Mary Hallay-Witte, fest. Die Religionspädagogin und systemische Therapeutin nahm am Dienstag in Rom an einer Konferenz über weibliche Stimmen in der Missbrauchskrise teil.

„Wir haben viele männliche Betroffene, die das Thema voranbringen, die das auch gut machen“, sagte Hallay-Witte im Gespräch mit uns. „Aber ich sehe in Deutschland im Moment wenig Frauen, die öffentlich auch in den Medien so präsent sind und ihre Forderungen stellen, wie wir das in Deutschland (bei Männern) erleben.“

Papa Francisco alista nueva carta a los obispos chilenos

[Pope Francis prepares new letter to Chilean bishops]

CHILE
La Tercera

November 30, 2018

By JP Iglesias and MJ Navarrete

Respecto del posible contenido de esta futura carta, fuentes consultadas creen que podría ser una misiva “muy dura”.

En un mes considerado clave para la Iglesia Católica en Chile, trascendió desde fuentes vaticanas que el Papa Francisco se encontraría preparando una nueva carta dirigida a los obispos de Chile.

Dem Vatikan laufen die Sponsoren weg

[The sponsors run away from the Vatican]

GERMANY
Die-tagespost.de

November 28, 2018

Die amerikanische Legatus Group verlangt Antworten auf ihre Fragen. Von Konstantin Stein

ür Schlagzeilen sorgt derzeit die Ankündigung der Legatus Group, der bedeutendsten Mitgliederorganisation für katholische Unternehmensführer in den USA, die Zahlung ihrer jährlichen Spende an den Vatikan in Höhe von 850 000 US-Dollar vorläufig auszusetzen. Der Gruppe gehören etwa 5 000 amerikanische Geschäftsleute mit einem Mindestjahresumsatz von 6,5 Millionen Dollar an. Hintergrund für die Entscheidung sind die Missbrauchs- und Finanzkrisen, in die Geistliche der katholischen Kirche, ja sogar hochrangige Stellen im Vatikan, verwickelt sind. Die Spenden will Legatus so lange zurückhalten, bis die Missstände aufgeklärt sind. Thomas Monaghan, der Vorsitzende der Organisation, forderte in seinem letzten Rundbrief die Mitglieder auf, auch weiterhin „für die Kirche und ihre Führungspersönlichkeiten“ zu beten, da es unübersehbar sei, dass die Aufarbeitung der aktuellen Krise in der Kirche noch Zeit brauche.

Sucesor de Ezzati llegará antes de la Navidad y vendría del extranjero

[Ezzati's successor will arrive before Christmas and come from abroad]

CHILE
La Tercera

December 1, 2018

By MJ Navarrete and S. Rodríguez

Biógrafo del Papa Francisco dijo que tenía información de “muy buenas fuentes en Chile”. Miembros de la Iglesia creen que será un administrador apostólico.

Fue el pasado 21 de septiembre cuando desde el Vaticano informaron que el Papa Francisco aceptaba las renuncias del exobispo de San Felipe, Cristián Contreras Molina, y su par de Chillán, Carlos Pellegrín. En su reemplazo designó a los administradores apostólicos Jaime Ortiz de Lazcano, vicario del Tribunal Eclesiástico de Santiago, y Sergio Pérez de Arce, sacerdote de la Congregación de los Sagrados Corazones.

Verdächtiges Material auf dem Rechner: Priester suspendiert

[Suspicious material on the computer: priest suspended]

GERMANY
Merkur.de

November 28, 2018

By Christian Masengarb

DER NÄCHSTE KIRCHEN-SKANDAL?

Die Polizei ermittelt gegen einen katholischen Priester aus dem Allgäu. Er hatte verdächtiges Material auf dem Computer. Der Priester wurde suspendiert.

Kempten/Augsburg - Gegen einen katholischen Priester aus Schwaben wird wegen des Besitzes verdächtiger Pornos ermittelt. Wie die Staatsanwaltschaft Kempten bekanntgab, sei gegen den Geistlichen eine Anzeige eingegangen, in deren Folge die Pornos auf seinem Computer gefunden wurden. Inwiefern es sich dabei um strafrechtlich relevantes Material handle, müsse aber noch geprüft werden. „Die Ermittlungen stehen noch ganz am Anfang“, sagte eine Sprecherin der Staatsanwaltschaft am Mittwoch.

Nach Angaben des Bischöflichen Ordinariats in Augsburg wurde der Priester inzwischen freigestellt. Die Staatsanwaltschaft hatte die Diözese über die Ermittlungen informiert. So sehe es die entsprechende Leitlinie der Deutschen Bischofskonferenz vor, teilte das Ordinariat mit. Dennoch gelte die Unschuldsvermutung.

Wheeling-Charleston Diocese Releases List of Priests Accused of Sexual Abuse Since 1950

WHEELING (WV)
The Intelligencer

November 30, 2018

By Alex Meyer

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston released Thursday the names of 31 clergy members accused of sexual abuse through lists that include dozens of incidents dating back as far as 1950.

The diocese released two lists — one of 18 priests accused while serving in the diocese and one of 13 priests who served in the diocese but were credibly accused elsewhere — with the hope that others who may have been victims will come forward. Of those 31 clergy members, 18 served in the Northern Panhandle.

“Every single one was a surprise,” Bryan Minor, delegate for administrative affairs for the diocese, said of the names during a press conference Thursday.

The diocese reviewed more than 2,000 files and tens of thousands of documents to produce the lists with the intent of being transparent and helping people heal, Minor said.

“The diocese sincerely apologizes to all victims of clergy sexual abuse and all the families or individuals who have been affected by sexual abuse within the church,” he said.

The lists include credible accusations of sex abuse against minors, meaning that there is a “reasonable cause” to believe an offense has occurred, Minor said. The incidents involve violations of the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, rules set by the church in 2002 to address abuse allegations. The lists also do not specify whether the misconduct conducted by clergy was criminal or not.

Felipe Berríos y nuevo arzobispo: “Se ha estirado el chicle”

[Felipe Berríos and new archbishop: "We are tired and overstretched"]

CHILE
La Tercera

December 1, 2018

By Leyla Zapata

Frente a la posibilidad de que el Papa designe este mes al sucesor del cardenal Ezzati, expertos dan su perfil ideal.

Si bien la crisis de la Iglesia Católica es nacional, la Arquidiócesis de Santiago es uno de los principales blancos de las críticas respecto de cómo las autoridades eclesiásticas han manejado los casos de abusos contra menores que involucran a miembros del clero. Mientras, el Ministerio Público indaga en todo Chile no solo eventuales abusos, sino también el presunto encubrimiento por parte de algunos religiosos.

Archdiocese submits sexual misconduct documents to Nebraska attorney general

OMAHA (NE)
Archdiocese of Omaha

November 30, 2018

The Archdiocese of Omaha has submitted to the Nebraska attorney general documents pertaining to church personnel accused of criminal sexual misconduct since 1978.

The documents included information on 24 archdiocesan priests with substantiated allegations of the abuse of minors or misconduct with minors. In all, documentation on 38 clergy were given to the attorney general for alleged abuse or misconduct with minors as far back as 1956 but reported to the archdiocese between 1978-2018.

“We acknowledge this report with sorrow, and know that it will cause a great deal of pain,” said Archbishop George Lucas. “We’re deeply saddened so many innocent minors and young adults were harmed by the church’s ministers. To victims and their families, I am sorry for the pain, betrayal and suffering you have experienced in the church.”

Advocates for abuse victims applaud Paquin verdict

NORTH ANDOVER (MA)
The Eagle Tribune

November 30, 2018

By Mike LaBella

The conviction of former Catholic priest Ronald Paquin on Thursday on charges he sexually abused a boy from his Haverhill parish during trips to Maine in the 1980s is being lauded as a victory for all victims of clergy sexual abuse.

Paquin, 76, was convicted of 11 of 24 counts of gross sexual misconduct. He was found not guilty of similar charges related to a second boy.

Paquin was convicted by a jury in York County, Maine, after a three-day trial that featured sometimes graphic testimony from his two accusers, now grown men. The charges covered the period between 1985 and 1988.

Paquin served at St. John the Baptist Church in Haverhill from 1981 to 1990, and St. Monica Church in Methuen from 1974 to 1980.

Attorney Mitchell Garabedian has represented thousands of clergy abuse victims both here and in other countries, including 25 victims of Paquin.

Un extranjero como nuevo arzobispo de Santiago: voceros de afectados por abusos valoran posibilidad

[Survivors' Network spokesman would welcome a foreigner as the new archbishop of Santiago]

CHILE
BioBioChile

December 2, 2018

By Claudia Miño and Beatriz Vallejos

Los voceros de la Red de Sobrevivientes de Abuso Sexual Eclesiástico de Chile y de los Laicos de Santiago manifestaron su conformidad ante el anuncio de uno de los biógrafos del papa Francisco, quien confirmó la inminente llegada del nuevo arzobispo de Santiago antes de Navidad.

El enojo con el obispo de Aysén por atribuir los casos de abusos a “la denuncia de una persona loca”

[Bishop of Aysén provokes anger by attributing abuse cases to "the denunciation of a crazy person"]

CHILE
El Mostrador

November 18, 2018

La Agrupación en Defensa de los niños y niñas de Aysén salió a paso de los dichos del obispo, quien es indagado por presunto encubrimiento de los abusos sexuales cometidos por el sacerdote Porfirio Díaz.

"Hay mucho imputado, yo entre ellos, y eso es fruto de la denuncia de una persona loca”. Esta fue la frase del Obispo vicario de Aysén, Luis Infanti de La Mora, respecto a los casos de abusos que le pesan a la Iglesia Católica, y que motivaron la indignación de la Agrupación en defensa de los niños y niñas de Aysén.

El misterioso viaje de Juan Carlos Cruz a Roma

[Juan Carlos Cruz's mysterious journey to Rome]

CHILE
La Tercera

December 1, 2018

El pasado miércoles 21, Cruz publicó en Facebook una nueva travesía. Desde el terminal 8 del aeropuerto John F. Kennedy despegó en un avión hacia Italia. Específicamente a Roma. Allá se reunió con Francisco, en calidad de “informante”, para explicar el estado de la Iglesia en Chile.

El Papa Francisco tiene varios “ojos y oídos” en territorio chileno. Fuentes conocedoras del tema explican que no solo se comunica con sacerdotes. También habla con otras personas. Una de ellas es Juan Carlos Cruz.

Diocese program offers sex abuse victim $35,000 to settle claim

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

December 3, 2018

By Jay Tokasz

Administrators of a program to compensate childhood victims of clergy sex abuse have made at least one settlement offer – to a man who accused a Buffalo Diocese priest of molesting him in a church rectory.

The man was offered $35,000 to settle his abuse claim and agree to not sue the Buffalo Diocese, said the man’s attorney, Kevin Stocker.

Stocker described the offer as insulting.

“It’s tough to put a value on wrecking peoples’ lives and wrecking their families’ lives, but I know it’s not $35,000,” Stocker said.

It appears to be one of the first offers made. The News spoke last week with more than a dozen victims and attorneys who represent victims – all of whom said they had not yet received offers. Some victims and attorneys said they had yet to meet with the administrators of the program, and they expressed frustration over how long the process is taking.

Diocese program offers sex abuse victim $35,000 to settle claim

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

December 3, 2018

By Jay Tokasz

Administrators of a program to compensate childhood victims of clergy sex abuse have made at least one settlement offer – to a man who accused a Buffalo Diocese priest of molesting him in a church rectory.

The man was offered $35,000 to settle his abuse claim and agree to not sue the Buffalo Diocese, said the man’s attorney, Kevin Stocker.

Stocker described the offer as insulting.

“It’s tough to put a value on wrecking peoples’ lives and wrecking their families’ lives, but I know it’s not $35,000,” Stocker said.

It appears to be one of the first offers made. The News spoke last week with more than a dozen victims and attorneys who represent victims – all of whom said they had not yet received offers. Some victims and attorneys said they had yet to meet with the administrators of the program, and they expressed frustration over how long the process is taking.

Syracuse Diocese releases names of accused priests

SYRACUSE (NY)
Observer-Dispatch

December 3, 2018

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse today released the names of those priests against whom it has found credible allegations of child sexual abuse.

The list, going back 70 years, contains 57 names. Each listing includes a date of ordination and the current status of the priest (e.g. removed from ministry, deceased, etc.) but not information on which parishes the priests were assigned to or when. There also is no information on when the alleged abuse took place, or how many accusations were made against them.

At least five of the priests previously served in the Utica area, however, according to O-D staff familiar with the local churches.

They are: Felix R. Colosimo, deceased; Robert J. Kloster, removed from ministry; James F. Quinn, deceased; H. Charles Sewall, deceased; William A. Lorenz, removed from ministry. All were ordained in the late 1950s or the 1960s.

The list is broken into sections based on how the claims against the priests were handled.

Jury selection set in suit over clergy sex abuse settlement

MORRISTOWN (NJ)
Associated Press

December 3, 2018

Jury selection is scheduled to begin in a Catholic order's lawsuit claiming an attorney violated a confidentiality clause in a clergy sex abuse case.

The Order of St. Benedict of New Jersey sued Gregory Gianforcaro for telling reporters in 2012 that a more than 20-year-old settlement with a former Delbarton School student was "approximately seven figures."

The lawsuit claims that statement was part of a "malicious and unethical attack" by Gianforcaro. Gianforcaro has denied the claims.

Buffalo Diocese has a $48 million surplus as it prepares to pay victims

BUFFALO (NY)
WKBW TV

December 3, 2018

By Charlie Specht

Victims of sexual abuse by clergy in the Diocese of Buffalo have been coming forward since March, when the diocese announced it would pay voluntary settlements to those who were abused.

While the bishop plans to sell his Oakland Place mansion to help pay those victims, internal church documents obtained by the 7 Eyewitness News I-Team show he will need much more money than the sale of the mansion -- assessed at nearly $2 million -- is likely to bring in. But the church appears to have plenty of money in the bank.

An internal balance sheet from August shows the diocese has $71 million in assets and $23 million in liabilities -- which leaves the church with a surplus of $48 million.

More than half of that surplus -- $31 million -- is undesignated for any specific use.

“They’re in strong shape,” said Michael Hoeflich, wealth manager at The Financial Guys in Amherst. “It could be cash that they have in bank accounts, savings accounts. It could be assets like property. It could be buildings, the furniture, it’s everything. And it also includes investments.”

7 Eyewitness News asked Hoelfich to look at the documents we obtained and evaluate the diocese’s finances.

A Church That Doesn't Take Any Chances With Youth Safety

SALT LAKE CITY (UT)
KUER Radio

December 3, 2018

By Lee Hale

On a typical Wednesday night at South Mountain Community Church in Draper, about 60 teenagers are gathered for youth group. There’s loud music playing over the speakers, lots of chatter and a very competitive foosball game in the corner of the room.

The youth night vibe is typical for a non-denominational Christian church: laid back, casual. But at SMCC they are anything but laid back when it comes to keeping the youth in this room safe.

In the past year, a rekindled national dialogue has focused on child and youth safety in religious settings, driven in part by revelations of abuses by Catholic priests, sexually explicit questions in a Mormon bishops office or #metoo accounts with pastors of megachurches. But SMCC is one church that hasn’t taken any chances when it comes to protecting children.

In fact every adult volunteer in the room — and there are a lot of them — has undergone a background check through Utah’s Department of Public Safety. Youth pastor Shane Lingo sees vetting the volunteers as one of the most critically important parts of his job.

Philippines Church must answer for child abuse

MANILLA (PHILIPPINES)
UCAnews.com

December 3, 2018

It seems as though children are at risk of sexual abuse everywhere — in public institutions, at schools, gyms, and in the Church.

When children are abused, the people of God are abused, too, for we are one family. Hardly a day passes without us reading of yet another case of a child sex abuser being caught, sentenced, and jailed.

One revelation follows another. It is good news to know that pedophiles and child rapists are being exposed, caught, and brought to justice at an ever-increasing rate. It is one of the most potent means to prevent child abuse.

There is more awareness and reporting of child abuse now than ever before, yet much has still to be done. Few clergy are caught nowadays.

Russian priest who raped boys at least 46 times jailed for 17 years

RUSSIA
RT TV

November 29, 2018

A Russian Orthodox priest, who sexually abused boys under the age of 14, has been sentenced to 17 years behind bars. While the priest was convicted of 46 rape counts, he was accused of molesting children nearly 90 times.

The rogue hieromonk Meletiy, Andrey Tkachenko, has served as the director of an Orthodox gymnasium in the Yakutia region since 2010. He was exposed and detained last March, initially facing two counts of sexually assaulting children.

As the investigation unfolded, the case grew to a truly terrifying scale. The priest ultimately faced 87 counts of sexual offences against boys aged below 14. ‘Only’ 46 counts were proven in court, however, which resulted in the sentence of 17 years at a maximum-security prison.

Apart from the jail time, the priest was slapped with a 400 thousand rubles ($6,000) fine and was ordered to get mandatory treatment from a psychiatrist.

Orthodox hierarchs of the Yakutia region are considering to strip Meletiy off his priesthood. The decision on the matter will be made following his appeals with higher Russian courts.

Experts question whether US bishops really need a new code of conduct

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

December 3, 2018

By Elise Harris

In the effort to tackle clerical sexual abuse, one step slotted for adoption by the U.S. bishops in their fall meeting was a new code of conduct for bishops, which would specifically address the issue of accountability not just for the crime but the cover-up.

Yet some experts dispute the need for a new code, saying the guidelines written out for all clergy in the 2002 Dallas Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People are valid for bishops too, if they are applied.

As the Baltimore meeting opened, the bishops were told by the Vatican to hold off on taking any action until after Pope Francis’s Feb. 21-24 summit on the abuse crisis with the heads of all bishops’ conferences, giving them time to take a new look on whether they actually need such a code.

Part of the reason the Vatican put on the brakes is reportedly due to several issues with canon law, with some critics feeling that the proposed new code was overly generic, leaving the specifics of what bishops would be accountable for unclear.

India Church 'glorifying' Indian bishop accused of raping nun

NEW DELHI (INDIA)
UCANnews.com

December 3, 2018

India's National Commission for Women has accused Catholic Church officials of failing to support and protect a nun who has accused a bishop of raping her.

Chairwoman Rekha Sharma told media in Kochi city on Dec. 1 that the official church was "glorifying" Bishop Franco Mulakkal of Jalandhar while failing to protect the alleged victim.

"They [church officials] are glorifying the accused bishop," Sharma said after meeting a delegation of Catholics who sought the commission's intervention to provide security for the nun and her supporters in a convent.

Sharma alleged that church officials were not listening or acting to protect the nuns. The church has also failed by not having an internal system to report sex abuse, she said.

"There was nobody she [the nun] could go to and complain. We have also written to the church urging them to constitute internal complaint committees where women can complain," she said.
The 48-year-old nun, former superior of the Missionaries of Jesus congregation, complained to Kerala police in July that Bishop Mulakkal raped her 13 times between 2014 and 2016.

Lawmakers call for investigation of Labor Secretary Acosta after scathing report

MIAMI (FL)
USA TODAY

November 30, 2018

By Christal Hayes and Jorge L. Ortiz

A Democratic group of lawmakers is calling for a Justice Department investigation into Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta after a scathing report revealed decade-old allegations that he granted an alleged serial pedophile the “deal of a lifetime’’ while serving as a U.S. attorney in South Florida.

The still-growing group, led by Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., called on Inspector General Michael Horowitz to investigate Acosta's role in a plea deal for Jeffrey Epstein, a multimillionaire financier. Epstein was convicted in 2008 of soliciting an underage girl for prostitution, but a Miami Herald investigation this week said the allegations against him were originally much broader, accusing him of coercing dozens of underage girls into sex acts.

As of Friday, six lawmakers had signed the letter calling for an investigation and seven others were scheduled to before it's sent to the Justice Department on Monday, according to a signed draft exclusively obtained by USA TODAY.

Pennsylvania's first compensation fund for priest-abuse victims now open

HARRISBURG (PA)
The Herald

December 2, 2018

By John Finnerty

A compensation fund for victims of priest abuse is up-and-running in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and similar funds are in various stages of development in other dioceses across the state.

The Philadelphia fund launched Nov. 13. Victims of priest abuse have until Sept. 30, 2019, to file claims seeking compensation.

The fund is being overseen by Kenneth Feinberg, who had the same responsibility with funds for victims of priest abuse in New York.

The compensation fund came in the wake of a series of grand jury investigations into the church’s decades-long policy of covering up priest abuse. The final report, covering six dioceses, concluded that there had been 300 predator priests who’d molested at least 1,000 victims.

Churches talk about Omaha Archdiocese sexual misconduct report at Mass

OMAHA (NE)
World Herald

December 3, 2018

By Kevin Cole

Some churches in the Catholic Archdiocese of Omaha used time before and during Mass on Sunday to react to the revelation of 38 clergy members being accused of sexual misdeeds with minors.

The archdiocese announced Friday that “substantiated claims of sexual abuse of, or sexual misconduct with, a minor” had been made against 34 priests and four deacons on a list it provided to Nebraska Attorney General Doug Peterson, who had asked for the information. The files go back to 1978, as requested by the attorney general. Only a few of the accused have faced criminal charges or civil lawsuits.

At St. Columbkille in Papillion, the Rev. Dave Reeson told church members that the Steinhausen Center will be renamed because the Rev. Robert O. Steinhausen was named in the report. Steinhausen died in 1993 at age 70 after 21½ years at the helm of St. Columbkille.

The archdiocese received a substantiated allegation against Steinhausen in 2008, after his death, said Deacon Tim McNeil, chancellor of the archdiocese.

Confronting Troubling Questions Ahead of February Bishops’ Meeting

IRONDALE (AL)
National Catholic Register

December 2, 2018

EDITORIAL: Time is short for concrete actions and authentic reforms. We cannot afford another missed opportunity.

The Holy See announced in September that Pope Francis would focus all of the energies and proposals in dealing with the growing global clergy sex-abuse crisis on one event: the gathering in Rome of the presidents of the world’s episcopal conferences Feb. 21-24, 2019.

The importance of the February summit gained heightened urgency for Catholics in the U.S. after the disastrous meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops last month in Baltimore, as well as the Pope’s Nov. 23 appointment of the February meeting’s four-member organizing committee. Comprising the committee to oversee the logistics and planning are Cardinal Blase Cupich of Chicago, Cardinal Oswald Gracias of Mumbai, India, Archbishop Charles Scicluna of Malta and Jesuit Father Hans Zollner.

What does the choice of the organizing committee mean for the gathering, and, above all, does it reveal a willingness to get to the root causes of the crisis?

Religious order Carmelites added as defendant in Guam clergy sex abuse lawsuits

GUAM
Pacific Daily News

December 3, 2018

By Haidee V Eugenio

A Catholic religious order, Discalced Carmelite Nuns, is now named as a defendant in dozens of clergy sex abuse cases involving the recently deceased Father Louis Brouillard.

Brouillard was assigned in the late '60s to early '70s to the San Isidro Parish in Malojloj where the Carmelites had a monastery or convent at the time.

Lawsuits filed by former altar boys, former members of the Boy Scouts of America, and former parishioners, state Brouillard sexually abused and molested them at the convent, where the priest was residing.

The original lawsuits were filed in 2017, and were amended this year to include the Carmelites. A summons recently was served at the Carmelite Monastery in Carmel, California.

The Carmelites, also known as the Order of Discalced Carmelites and Carmel of the Immaculate Conception, arrived on Guam in 1966 and built a monastery and convent in Malojloj in 1968, the amended complaints said. The Carmelites later relocated to Tamuning.

Legal fees mount for Catholic dioceses amid sex abuse investigations

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Tribune Review

December 2, 2018

By Deb Erdley

Pennsylvania Catholic dioceses began to ante up legal fees in the wake of a statewide grand jury long before last summer, when the panel released its scathing report detailing allegations of rampant clergy sexual abuse and cover-ups.

Recent financial reports in two dioceses — Greensburg and Erie — show those fees total about $5 million and counting. Church officials across the state concede legal costs are poised to grow as the U.S. Justice Department probes church records and Pennsylvania dioceses prepare to launch settlement funds for victims of past abuse.

December 2, 2018

Syracuse priest list includes 'dozens' of sex abuse cases DA says he can't prosecute

SYRACUSE (NY)
Syracuse.com

December 2, 2018

By Julie McMahon

The Syracuse diocese's list of abusive priests contains the names of "dozens" of people who can no longer be prosecuted for sex crimes against children, according to Onondaga County District Attorney William Fitzpatrick.

Some of those priests are deceased, the diocese said in a statement Saturday. The list, which will be released Monday morning, includes allegations dating back to the 1950s. New York state's statute of limitations prevents Fitzpatrick from pursuing charges against the others.

"The list, if it had one name on it, would be distressing," Fitzpatrick said. "And the fact that it has dozens of names on it, I personally think, is a crisis that is affecting the Catholic Church greater than the Reformation. It is so distressing."

Fitzpatrick, who is Roman Catholic, was comparing the clergy sex abuse scandal that has continued to plague the church since it was first exposed in the early 2000s to a time in the 16th Century when Protestants broke from the Catholic Church.

Priest's View: Bishops, chancery officials who failed children can step aside

DULUTH (MN)
News Tribune

December 1, 2018

By Fr. William Fider

There continues to be much anger and outrage and shame and sadness in the Catholic Church over the abuse scandals and especially over the coverups by the bishops. Most agree now that the root cause of our troubles is the failure of the bishops' leadership.

Bishops and chancery officials who should have stopped the pain and suffering of children decided to protect themselves instead. Some chancery officials even advanced up the ecclesial ladder, even though they were involved in the coverups. When confronted with the crisis, the bishops acted as if they were the victims and not the abused children.

So far, we've seen mostly pious words and not much action from our bishops. It looks like the bishops simply want to take a mulligan.

Our confidence in our bishops has been shattered, and now our church is running out of time.

Priest sentenced to 12 years in prison for three counts of sexual battery

ATHENS (OH)
Athens Post

November 27, 2018

By Ellen Wagner and Logan Moore

Henry Christopher Foxhoven was sentenced Tuesday to 12 years in the State Penal System for three counts of sexual battery and will be registered as a sex offender for life.

Foxhoven, 45, of Glouster, was a priest at the Holy Cross Catholic Church in Glouster, a part of the Diocese of Steubenville. He pleaded guilty to three charges for engaging in sexual conduct with a minor, a parishioner of the church, in the church rectory where he lived.

Each count was four years in prison, totaling a sentence of 12 years. That was a part of an agreement that other charges, such as child pornography or criminal tools, would not be brought against him. If another victim, however, comes forward, he could be charged again.

As a part of his agreement, he is not allowed to apply or accept any early release. After his release, he has five years of mandatory post-release control and has to register as a sex offender, requiring him to report to a sheriff’s office every 90 days for life.

Nuns need protection from rapist priests

INDIA
The Hans India

December 2, 2018

This refers to the report ‘NCW slams church for not protecting nun's interests’ (THI, Dec 1). The Church authorities have backstabbed the victim in the Jalandhar bishop rape case.

The victim is still praying hard as she has not got any justice in her case as the alleged bishop is on bail and enjoying a normal life. The Church authorities should have shown some decency in protecting the nun's interest.

Instead, what they did was to organise a grand roaring welcome for the rape accused bishop. This type of act by church authorities will definitely send a bad message to the society.

Sharadchandran S, New Delhi

Pope Francis Goes Full Homophobic, Now ‘Very Worried’ About Homosexuality in the Church

ROME (ITALY)
Daily Beast

December 2, 2018

By Barbie Latza Nadeau

Remember back in 2013, shortly after Pope Francis was elected when he shocked the world with his words: “If a person seeks God and has goodwill, then who am I to judge,” when asked about a gay priest?

What was then seen to be a change in decades of dogma sent shockwaves around the world, landing the pontiff on the cover of Advocate and winning him praise among LGBTQ groups and lapsed Catholics. In some ways, Francis has been eating his words ever since, constantly called to explain by conservatives in the church what he meant.

Now it seems Francis isn't mincing his words on the topic. He told Spanish Claretian missionary Fernando Prado that in reality he's actually “very worried” about homosexuality in the church. Prado, whose book La Forza della Vocazione (The Strength of Vocation) comes out in multiple languages on Monday, spent four hours interviewing the pontiff in Vatican City this fall about problems in the priesthood. Italy's Corriere Della Sera newspaper excerpted parts of the book on Saturday.

Deacon accuses Niantic priest of attempted sexual assault

NORWICH (CT)
The Day

December 1, 2018

By Joe Wojtas

A former deacon at Sacred Heart Church in Groton has alleged that the current pastor of St. Agnes Church in Niantic, the Rev. Gregory Mullaney, repeatedly propositioned him for sex while on a 2006 trip to Rome and tried to sexually assault him in the street after he fled from a restaurant where the two had been dining.

In addition, Deacon Mark King alleges in a sworn statement he made in 2006 that during the trip Mullaney drank heavily and made numerous crude sexual remarks about other priests, nuns and church employees, some of whom he said he'd had sex with in violation of Catholic law.

"Marco, what do you say? Let's go back to the room and get it on. Come on, what are you afraid of?" Mullaney allegedly said to King during one of his wine-fueled lunches. Later Mullaney added, "You know you want it and I'm going to give it you," and told King that "what happens in Rome stays in Rome." Many of the other alleged comments in the statement are too graphic for publication.

King reported Mullaney's actions to Diocese of Norwich. Mullaney was removed from Sacred Heart and since has been assigned to at least three other parishes, including St. Agnes.

The diocese refused to release a list of Mullaney's parish assignments or say if there have been other complaints. Bishop Michael Cote declined a request for an interview about King's allegations. Diocesan spokesman Wayne Gignac said that "publicly addressing specific allegations on individual matters is improper and unfair to the involved parties."

Mullaney, who didn't respond to phone and email messages, declined to comment on King's allegations when asked about them outside St. Agnes two weeks ago.

During a four-hour interview Oct. 31 in the kitchen of their current home in Charlotte, N.C., King and his wife, Susan, a licensed marriage and family therapist, questioned why Cote would risk protecting Mullaney and in 2009 transfer him to St. Thomas Aquinas Church, which serves students at the University of Connecticut. From 2007 to 2009, he served at St. Colman Church in Middlefield, according to that church's website.

Facing the flock

RAPID CITY (SD)
Washington Post

November 30, 2018

By Terrence McCoy

Brian Christensen is on his way to jail again. Clerical collar around his thin neck, rosary dangling from the rearview mirror, the priest sets out on the same trip he has taken almost every day that week. First was Monday afternoon, when he followed the detectives down this road, then up to the third floor of the police department, where he waited outside the interrogation room. On Wednesday, he went to the preliminary hearing, where the felony charges were announced: two counts of sexual contact with a 13-year-old. On Thursday, and on Friday, he returned to arrange a visitation with the Rev. John Praveen, 38, whom he last saw being cuffed and led into a police car, and who is now being held on a $100,000 cash bond and facing 30 years in prison.

Now, Monday again, Christensen pulls out of the parking lot at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, where as lead pastor he oversaw Praveen’s clerical duties. He makes the five-minute drive to the Pennington County jail, where he plans to speak with the incarcerated priest for the first time since his arrest.

“Aren’t you tired of all this?” his mother asked him on the phone that morning, and he could only sigh and say, yes, “I am tired of this.”

This: a string of child sex abuse scandals that — spanning decades, continents and thousands of victims — has fundamentally altered how the world views the Catholic Church and priests like him, in particular. With every crisis, Christensen had allowed himself to hope that now, perhaps, it would be over, only to see another year like this one, when every day seems to bring news of sex crimes and cover-ups in the church. A grand jury report in Pennsylvania accused more than 300 priests of abusing about 1,000 children, spurring federal authorities to investigate. Two U.S. cardinals have been disgraced. And approval ratings for Pope Francis, who once was the world’s most popular leader, have plummeted among Americans.

Waukesha judge orders Pewaukee priest to stand trial for felony child sex abuse

MILWAUKEE (WI)
Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

November 30, 2018

By Peter Isely

A Waukesha County judge this morning has determined that there is sufficient evidence for Fr. Charles Hanel to stand trial for felony sexual assault of a child. Hanel was arrested in September for sexually abusing a 13-year-old girl in the confessional. The alleged assault took place at Queen of Apostles Church in Pewaukee where Hanel is pastor.

Hanel, through his defense team, has been unusually aggressive in out of court statements concerning the case, challenging both the alleged victim and her account of the assault, along with suggesting that the case was being brought as a “referendum” on the sex abuse scandal in the church. She is a child, however, and unable to defend herself in public, as he can. Hanel’s superior, Archbishop Jerome Listecki, needs to make it very clear that while Hanel can hire an expensive legal team, the church will not tolerate public messages that can only result in dissuading or intimidating potential victims of priest abuse, especially children, from coming forward. Hanel is, presumably, still salaried by the archdiocese and is taking care of his housing and living expenses.

A campaign to deliver a clear message to Catholic Bishops

SACRAMENTO (CA)
Not 1 Dime

December 2018

By Ray Riehle

Not 1 Dime Until These Minimum Standards are met

Our Proposal:

If you are upset about child abuse and the allegations of sexual harassment in the Catholic Church, Join Us If you have put your faith aside out of disgust with the lack of proper Church reaction, Join us. If you are angry with the lies, coverup, rotational policies and denials, Join Us with this simple message: Not 1 Dime more in the collection plate- Join us in this call for action!

What Must Be Done

1. We Want the Roman Catholic Church to be respected around the world. Our goal is to restore the Church to relevance. Our demand is the implementation of practice and policy consistent with moral standards and decency expected by the Church faithful - we know what is right.

2. We want the First Person Called when there is an accusation carries a gun and a badge.

Expert sees cyberspace full of risk, from addictions to child abuse

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

December 1, 2018

By Elise Harris

A leading expert in cyberpsychology describes a digital culture today in which children and pre-teens have virtually unfiltered access to online pornography, and she predicts that one day parents who fail to monitor their children’s online activity may be found guilty of criminal child abuse.

“I can see later down the line that parents or caregivers who allow their very young children to be exposed to hardcore pornography on their phone and on their devices …that may be considered, in terms of social welfare and social services, as the active abuse of a child,” said Mary Aiken, Adjunct Associate Professor at University College in Dublin and an Academic Advisor to the European Cyber Crime Centre at Europol for Ireland.

Aiken told Crux the widespread diffusion of sexual content online has been described in some circles as “the ‘pornification’ of society.”

This is a problem for youngsters, because “children are vulnerable to being damaged by what we call legal but age-inappropriate content,” she said, explaining that in the UK, there is currently talk of developing an “A” and “B” internet, where households who actually want porn will have to put their name on a list and sign up for it.

Kate O’Beirne, Christ, and the Catholic Church

WASHINGTON (DC)
National Review

December 2, 2018

By Katheryn Jean Lopez

On Thursday night at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C., Mary Rice Hasson hosted the inaugural Kate O’Beirne Event, in honor of our late National Review and National Review Institute colleague. The event was entitled “The Future of the Church: Synod, Scandal, and Solace,” sponsored by the Catholic Women’s Forum, a program of the Ethics and Public Policy Center. I was honored to say a few words at the start of the program about my beloved friend. The following piece has been adapted from my remarks.

There’s so much I can and want to say about Kate O’Beirne, but I hope these brief remarks help us all a little.

I first met Kate O’Beirne when I was an undergraduate at the Catholic University of America. I was an intern at the Heritage Foundation, and she was vice president of government relations there. I looked up to her, even before I knew her. When I got to know her, my gratitude to her, and to God for her, only ever grew. It only ever has.

She was wise and fun. She was smart and bold.

Kate O’Beirne, Christ, and the Catholic Church

WASHINGTON (DC)
National Review

December 2, 2018

By Katheryn Jean Lopez

On Thursday night at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C., Mary Rice Hasson hosted the inaugural Kate O’Beirne Event, in honor of our late National Review and National Review Institute colleague. The event was entitled “The Future of the Church: Synod, Scandal, and Solace,” sponsored by the Catholic Women’s Forum, a program of the Ethics and Public Policy Center. I was honored to say a few words at the start of the program about my beloved friend. The following piece has been adapted from my remarks.

There’s so much I can and want to say about Kate O’Beirne, but I hope these brief remarks help us all a little.

I first met Kate O’Beirne when I was an undergraduate at the Catholic University of America. I was an intern at the Heritage Foundation, and she was vice president of government relations there. I looked up to her, even before I knew her. When I got to know her, my gratitude to her, and to God for her, only ever grew. It only ever has.

She was wise and fun. She was smart and bold.

A Season of Judgment, and Purifying Fire

UNITED STATES
Patheos blog

December 2, 2018

By Rebecca Bratten Weiss

Going to mass, this past year, has not been easy. First, there is always the danger, no matter which local parish I attend, of running into one of the people who harassed and libeled me at my former academic post. When not in church I can amuse myself by giving them sly, knowing looks – as though they have a booger hanging out of their nostril, or toilet paper on their shoe, and I’m not going to say – but this seems not quite a fitting attitude for worship.

Then there was my family’s mounting frustration with our former parish priest, an authoritarian individual who seemed utterly unaware of the basics of theology, but instead pulled deranged scripture exegesis out of thin air, while also treating his congregation as though we were village idiots desperately in need of his enlightenment. We finally had enough, left the parish, and have been the proverbial “roaming catholics” ever since.

Then, of course, the sex abuse scandal broke, and it wasn’t just the horror of the details: it was that they clearly hadn’t learned from the last go-around. And, to judge from the behavior of many bishops, are still refusing to learn. In the months since we first heard of the Pennsylvania Grand Jury Report, so many of my friends have left the church, and I can’t blame them. And many of us who remain, meanwhile, are asking ourselves: how can we stay, without being complicit?

Juan Carlos Cruz: the survivor who changed the pope’s mind on sex abuse

NEW YORK (NY)
America Magazine

November 30, 2018

By Ashley McKinless

“The church has to change that paradigm, that way of thinking that survivors are enemies of the church and want to destroy the church,” said Juan Carlos Cruz. “It’s quite the opposite. There’s a lot of people that have been destroyed by the church and others that have been wronged in the worst way by the church and yet they still want to move forward and call themselves Catholics.”

Juan Carlos has been advocating for survivors for years, since he publicly disclosed that as a child he was abused by the notorious predator Fernando Karadima, a Chilean Catholic priest. For a long time, the Catholic Church in Chile disregarded the abuse allegations against the powerful cleric. One cardinal even told Juan Carlos it was hard to believe he was a victim because he is gay and “might have liked it.” When Pope Francis visited Chile earlier this year, he initially dismissed as “slander” allegations from Juan Carlos and other victims that a bishop had covered up Karadima’s abuse. Yet Juan Carlos persisted and, by sharing his story, has changed the church in Chile and given hope to many other survivors.

The church has to change that paradigm that that way of thinking that survivors are enemies of the church and want to destroy the church.

We ask Juan Carlos: What it’s like to feel betrayed by the pope—and to have the pope ask for your forgiveness? What concrete steps do Pope Francis and the church need to take to protect and bring healing to survivors of sexual abuse?

In Signs of the Times, the International Union of Superiors General is urging sisters who have been abused to report the crimes to police and their superiors, more details emerge about February’s global summit on sex abuse at the Vatican and Catholics respond to the migrant crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border. Plus, we discuss the U.S. bishops’ new pastoral letter on racism. It’s been 40 years since the bishops have spoken together on racial justice. Does this statement go far enough?

Faithful Urged To Remain Vigilant

WHEELING (WV)
The Intelligencer

December 2, 2018

Church-goers within the Roman Catholic Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston are still reeling from the revelation that 18 of their priests have had credible accusations of sexual abuse against them in the Northern Panhandle.

It also was revealed that 13 additional diocesan priests had been accused in other states.

Since the Diocese released the list of abusers last week, current clergy have struggled with the news and how to bring a new sense of faith to their congregations.

Some pastors have chosen not to address the sex scandal from the pulpit during Mass on Saturday evening and today.

Others have weaved today’s Gospel readings into their comments about the abuse.

December 1, 2018

Prayer and conversation with Bishop W. Shawn McKnight

JEFFERSON CITY (MO)
Jefferson City Diocese

December 2018

Approximately 500 attended one of six listening sessions in the Diocese between Oct. 28 and Nov. 6, 2018, to provide an opportunity for Catholics to respond to the proposed agenda for the fall November 2018 US Conference of Catholic Bishops’ General Assembly. In addition, people were encouraged to submit answers in writing or via email.

The text below has names and other personal information removed, and has been edited for clarity, while still honoring the authors’ primary points. Four reflection questions were offered, and speakers were advised to explain which question they were addressing. Readers will quickly recognize this advice was not always followed. The responses are not organized in any other way.

How can the bishops rebuild trust in their leadership, both among Catholics and others?
We need for all bishops to be 100 percent transparent in what’s being done. We need to be well informed and very open about what rules are being changed, what is happening. Would say I don’t believe bishops should be put out on their own. I think they should be sent to where they spend their whole days praying about why they did what they did if they’re guilty of these things. I think they should definitely be found guilty before they’re chastised. And I know that’s not always easy. It’s easy to accuse someone 35 years later. I’ve seen that happen to innocent people. I’ve seen it happen to guilty people. So I would like to make sure that those who are chastised are truly guilty of having committed these heinous things. Thank you.

We have not been catechized properly in terms of sexuality. I would respectfully ask the bishop to always promote the teachings of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. There is a wealth of knowledge in it that we just don’t know.

Syracuse Diocese to release list of clergy accused of sexual abuse of children

SYRACUSE (NY)
Syracuse.com

December 1, 2018

By Jacob Pucci

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse will publish a list Monday of clergy credibly accused of sexual abuse of a minor in the diocese since 1950.

The list will be available online Monday morning (Dec. 3) on thecatholicsun.com and syrdio.org.

The list will include the names of priests both living and deceased, the diocese said in a statement announcing the list's release.

The release of the list was publicly announced in a letter from Bishop Robert J. Cunningham to diocese parishioners today and made available in all parishes over the weekend. Priests were informed in meetings with the bishop on Thursday. Diocesan staff were informed Friday.

The decision to release the names of abusive priests is an apparent reversal of Cunningham's previous policy, which was to confirm the names once a victim makes it public, but not to release a list.

Survivors network: Church, Hawley slow to oust sex abusers

COLUMBIA (MO)
Columbia Daily Tribune

December 1, 2018

By Pat Pratt

Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests says the Jefferson City Diocese and Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley are not doing enough to investigate and raise awareness of sex abuse by clergy.

Bishop W. Shawn McKnight released in November a list of 33 names of Jefferson City Diocese clergy that had been “credibly accused” of illicit sexual acts involving minors. The list came during a listening tour regarding the abuse crisis in the Catholic Church and on the heels of an announced investigation by Hawley.

David Clohessy, St. Louis director and longtime member of SNAP, says the list is incomplete. He claims that three names, one being a priest who lived in a Columbia rectory and was later deemed a sexually violent predator, were not included.

“It just takes seconds, literally seconds for a predator to shove his hands in a child’s pants,” Clohessy said. “If they know that predator, especially a serial predator, was in the diocese, then McKnight owes it to the parents and parishioners to let them know.”

Father Fred Lenczycki worked at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Columbia and another parish in St. James in the mid-1980s, according to a SNAP information release. He was arrested and convicted in 2004 of abusing three boys in the Joliet, Illinois, area, where he was ordained, and is believed to have molested many more children in multiple states. His current whereabouts are unknown.

The other omitted names are those of Father John C. Baskett and Father Kenneth J. Roberts. Baskett, the release states, worked in Boonville and Tipton and was accused in 2007 of abusing a 15-year-old girl for two years and using

After priest accused of sex abuse at Jesuit High, he moved near Jesuit college: report

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
Times-Picayune

December 1, 2018

By Hanna Krueger

After being accused of sexually abusing a student at Jesuit High School in New Orleans in the 1970s, a Roman Catholic priest went to live at a Jesuit nursing home near a Jesuit college in New York. But the college didn’t know about the allegations against him, WVUE television reports.

Fordham University said the now-deceased Corneilus Carr lived at a Jesuit nursing home near the school’s Bronx campus. Spokesman Bob Howe told WVUE: “The university was not aware of the allegations against Father Carr until The Ram, the student newspaper based at our Rose Hill campus, raised them.

"That was a lapse on our part, and one that will not be repeated. It is the University’s duty to ensure the safety of its students, faculty and staff, and while we don’t believe any members of the Fordham community have been placed at risk by Father Carr’s presence, it was inappropriate to house him in proximity to a college campus and high school.”

Diocese discloses names of priests who sexually abused minors

SPRINGFIELD (IL)
Journal Register

November 29, 2018

By Steven Spearie

The Diocese of Springfield on Thursday afternoon, in response to a review by the Illinois Attorney General’s office, released the names of 19 priests — including a former bishop — that it confirmed were the subjects of substantiated charges of sexually abusing children.

Though individual priests may have been identified over the years, the Springfield Diocese confirmed that this is the first comprehensive list of abuse cases it has ever released.

A diocesan review board had determined that the priests named on the lists had substantiated allegations of sexual abuse of minors. The Review Board, which has been in place since 2002, has been comprised of predominantly lay people with professional backgrounds in areas such as state and local law enforcement, criminal and civil law, education, and psychology, the diocese said.

“Any single case of abuse is one too many,” Bishop Thomas John Paprocki said in a statement. “But this review has shown the positive impact of a zero-tolerance approach, and we are committed to sustain these efforts with heightened vigilance.”

Twelve priests on the list are dead. They were Alvin Campbell, Robert Dodd, Michael Driscoll, Robert Eagear, George Faller, Ray Franzen, George Kromenaker, Joseph C. O’Brien, Frank O’Hara, Daniel Ryan, Aloysius Schwellenbach and Frank Westhoff.

Ryan, who abruptly resigned as bishop in 1999, died in 2015. An independent investigative report in 2006 stated that Ryan fostered “a culture of secrecy” in the diocese that discouraged priests from coming forward with information about sexual misconduct by other priests in the diocese, which covers 28 counties in central Illinois.

The 2006 report, authored by Springfield attorney and former state’s attorney and federal attorney Bill Roberts, said Ryan “engaged in sexual misconduct with adults and used his authority to conceal this misconduct.” Ryan was never charged or prosecuted.

Four other priests named on Thursday — Joseph Cernich, Eugene Costa, Joseph Havey and Walter Weerts — were listed as laicized, or having been removed from the priesthood. As such, the diocese does not keep records on their whereabouts, said spokeswoman Marlene Mulford.

Three names were denoted as no longer in ministry, a designation for priests without the faculties of priesthood: Garrett Neal Dee, Robert DeGrand and Francis Tebangura.

Rethinking W.Va. Age of Consent

WHEELING (WV)
The Intelligencer

December 1, 2018

Why do some predator priests escape imprisonment? Here in West Virginia, the age of consent — that at which voluntary sexual contact is legal — is 16 years in most cases.

At the same time, state code recognizes that “intimidation, expressed or implied, by another person who is at least four years older than the victim” can be a factor in sexual assault and abuse.

People in many walks of life — police officers, teachers, employers and yes, members of the clergy — are capable of intimidating victims. Being convinced one’s immortal soul is in danger if one does not comply with a predator’s demands certainly ought to qualify as intimidation.

Perhaps state legislators should take another look at the age of consent when such intimidation is a factor. We insist on protecting those under 18 from purchasing cigarettes, after all. Why not protect them against coerced sexual contact, too?

Protestants also face #ChurchToo scandals.

NEW YORK (NY)
Media Project

November 30, 2018

By Richard Ostling

A #ChurchToo parallel first burst into the news 33 years ago with pioneering National Catholic Reporter coverage of child molestation by priests. Now, Pope Francis’ Feb. 21-24 emergency meeting about this unending problem is a must-cover item on newsroom calendars.

But North American journalism should be giving more attention to Protestants’ degradation on this and related issues. There’s no good data about such variegated churches, but by every indication misconduct is far more widespread than parishioners would like to admit.

A handy way to assess matters in Protestantism’s large evangelical sector occurs Dec. 13, a “summit” meeting on sexual violence and harassment at Wheaton College, outside of Chicago. The event will be live-streamed in case reporters cannot attend in person. Speakers include luminaries Eugene Cho, Max Lucado, Beth Moore and the host, Ed Stetzer, a trend-watcher who directs Wheaton’s Billy Graham Center (bgc@wheaton.edu, 630–752-5918).

Stetzer’s urgent summit summons stated that “trust has been broken, power has been abused” and, most important, there are the “deeply wounded” victims – “more than we’d ever want to count.” So “it is past time all church leaders deal with it.” The scandals “are many, and the damage is real. … Turning a blind eye is simply not an option. … Something’s got to change, and soon.”

Province to Conduct Audit of All Personnel Files Dating Back to 1955

ST. LOUIS (MO)
Jesuits Central & Southern

November 16, 2018

The Jesuits U.S. Central and Southern Province has retained an outside organization, Kinsale Management Consulting, Inc., to review all personnel files of Jesuits going back to 1955 in preparation of publicly releasing the names of all Jesuits and former Jesuits of the province who have been credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors.

Kinsale Management Consulting is a respected organization comprised of retired FBI agents and law enforcement personnel.

This review will include all Jesuits for whom the province has records who have entered, worked in, or died in the current province, the former New Orleans Province, the former Missouri Province, or the Region of Puerto Rico of the Society of Jesus since 1955. The audit will result in a list of Jesuits and former Jesuits of this province against whom there are credible allegations of abuse of a minor consistent with the standards of the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People

Boston Globe Editor Robby Robinson to speak in Paradise Valley

SCOTTSDALE (AZ)
Paradise Valley Independent

November 30, 2018

Ivy Council alumni and their guests are invited to a speaker presentation, which the Harvard Business School Club of Arizona is hosting Thursday, Jan. 24 with Boston Globe Editor Robby Robinson.

Mr. Robinson was the investigative reporting lead on the Catholic church scandal, according to a release. A light dinner will be served at the event.

The event will be from 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the Community Room of Paradise Valley Town Hall, 6401 E. Lincoln Drive.

Former priest's talk, moderated forum to focus on Catholic crisis

BUFFALO (NY)
Buffalo News

November 30, 2018

By Jay Tokasz

Two upcoming separate events — a former priest's talk Sunday and a parish-sponsored forum Monday — will address the clergy sex abuse crisis in the Catholic church and the Buffalo Diocese.

Roy Bourgeois, removed from the Catholic priesthood over his outspoken support for women's ordination, will discuss "Crisis in the Catholic Church: Clericalism or the Gospel," at 3 p.m. Sunday in the Center for Tomorrow on the North Campus of the University at Buffalo in Amherst.

Bourgeois, a Maryknoll order priest for more than 40 years, was dismissed from the priesthood in 2012 after he refused a Vatican order to recant his participation in a 2008 ordination Mass for a Lexington, Ky. woman. The Vatican determined his support for women’s ordination was a cause of “grave scandal."

Bourgeois responded by saying, "when Catholics hear the word 'scandal,' they think about the thousands of children who have been raped and abused by Catholic priests — not the ordination of women."

Speaking of Religion: The Upstaging of Good News

BENNINGTON (VT)
Bennington Banner

November 30, 2018

By David M. O'Brien

It is a common human experience that bad news upstages good news, that conflict and tragedy overshadow stories of cooperation and initiation. Well, this certainly has been the case for the Catholic Church lately. With the reports and re-reports of the sexual abuse scandal and its unbelievable cover-up on the part of some bishops, the unintended consequence has been that all the good news happening in the Church has been push into the background or not mentioned at all.

One of those under-reported happenings, here in the Diocese of Burlington, has been the statewide Diocesan Synod that was called to order by Bishop Christopher Coyne. The process, started over a year ago, has as its purpose: "to establish a pastoral plan for the immediate future in the Catholic Church in Vermont and to establish laws and policies to do so." Now, I understand from my friends on the Interfaith Council that synods are not that uncommon in some of the Protestant faith communities. But, it is uncommon in our Catholic tradition, with the last diocesan-wide synod happening way back in 1962.

After Bishop Coyne selected a steering committee to shepherd the process, delegates were solicited from each parish in Vermont as well as representatives from the priests, deacons and religious communities. Though the synod started officially this fall, there were three preparatory meetings throughout this past year, plus summer work committees, that helped winnow down the concerns and direction. From the beginning, Bishop Coyne asked to hear from his flock. He queried each parish with three questions: what was our Church doing well, what we were not and what we could do to improve. And he got what he asked for.

Church scandals must remain in spotlight

PITTSBURGH (PA)
Post Gazette

November 30, 2018

I deeply appreciate the Post-Gazette’s ongoing coverage and revelations about the abuse scandal in the Catholic Church. The Nov. 25 front page article, “Hiding Behind God,” left me reeling. I hope to see the issue shoved in the face of church hierarchy until atonement and justice prevail.

Every bishop should step down. Every church altar and statue should be draped in black. No one, priest or parishioner, should be permitted for a minute to forget, rationalize or dismiss the abhorrent crime that has been committed.

As investigation hits home diocese, can Cardinal DiNardo continue to lead on the abuse crisis?

NEW YORK (NY)
America Magazine

November 30, 2018

By Kevin Clarke

Investigators for the district attorney of Montgomery County in Texas executed a search warrant seeking records pertaining to the handling of instances of alleged clerical abuse at the offices of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston on Nov. 28. The spectacle of dozens of Texas Rangers and other local law enforcement swarming the Houston chancery offered the latest unprecedented moment as the church in the United States grapples with the ongoing crisis of the clerical abuse of children and vulnerable adults. The archdiocese is headed by Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and the person leading the U.S. bishops’ response to the crisis.

In a statement released on Nov. 28 representatives for the archdiocese said it had no comment on the investigation at this time.

The D.A.’s investigation raises questions about how Cardinal DiNardo and his staff dealt with complaints against Father Manuel La Rosa-Lopez, accused by two people of assault two decades ago when they were teenagers. Both victims told The Associated Press that they met with Cardinal DiNardo but felt he did not take their complaints about Father La Rosa-Lopez seriously.

The leader of the Houston chapter of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests has already called for Cardinal DiNardo to step down to accept responsibility for alleged failures in Galveston-Houston and during a previous position as bishop of the Diocese of Sioux City. Presuming the bad press in Texas will continue, can Cardinal DiNardo continue to credibly lead the U.S. bishops as the conference seeks a way out of the abuse crisis?

“The answer is we don’t know,” said Tom Reese, S.J., a columnist for Religion News Service, a former editor in chief at America and a long-time observer of the U.S. church. “We have to wait until the prosecutor comes forward and says what he found and says what the situation is there.

Cardinal DiNardo computer, boxes of ‘sex allegation files’ seized

HOUSTON (TX)
KHOU 11 TV

November 30, 2018

By Jeremy Rogalski, Jessica Borg & Tina Macias

Two boxes of “sex allegation files” and Cardinal Daniel DiNardo’s computer are among the items seized by authorities at the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston on Wednesday, according to an evidence log obtained by KHOU 11 Investigates on Friday.

Along with DiNardo’s computer, an iPad and two other computers in his office were also taken and were among about a dozen electronics gathered by the Montgomery County District Attorney’s Office.

In the search warrant filed Wednesday, the DA’s office sought files into the investigation of Rev. Manuel La Rosa-Lopez, a former priest charged with four counts of indecency with a child in Montgomery County, and confidential documents held in the Archdiocese’s Chancery and secret archives.

Investigators seized several files about La Rosa-Lopez, but that was just part of the long list of items they took into evidence. Files, a folder, binder and boxes of sex allegations, letters from parishioners about sex abuse, a spreadsheet of claims, insurance reports and multiple personnel files were also seized.

The personnel files included two for current priests. Those priests are Rev. Alberto Maullon, who pleaded guilty to exposing himself at an adult bookstore in 2010, and Rev. Terrance Brinkman, who was sued in 2010 for a sexual abuse claim dating back to the 1970s. That case was dismissed because the statute of limitations had passed.

Priest credibly accused of child sex abuse was housed at Jesuit nursing home after abuse allegedly happened

NEW ORLEANS (LA)
WVUE TV

November 30, 2018

By Kimberly Curth

New information in FOX 8′s investigation of church sex abuse. We’ve learned a priest credibly accused of sex abuse at Jesuit High School in the 1970s was housed at a New York university after the abuse here allegedly happened.

According to Fordham University the now deceased Corneilus Carr lived at a Jesuit nursing home near the school’s campus after he allegedly sexually abused a minor in New Orleans.

In a statement to Fox 8, Bob Howe, Fordham’s Assistant Vice President for Communications, said “the University was not aware of the allegations against Father Carr until The Ram, the student newspaper based at our Rose Hill campus, raised them. That was a lapse on our part, and one that will not be repeated. It is the University’s duty to ensure the safety of its students, faculty, and staff, and while we don’t believe any members of the Fordham community have been placed at risk by Father Carr’s presence, it was inappropriate to house him in proximity to a college campus and high school.”

We spoke with Carr’s alleged victim in a TV exclusive. Richard Windmann, told us Jesuit High School janitor Peter Modica repeatedly raped him at the school in the late 70′s. Windmann says Carr, who was a priest and teacher at Jesuit, not only knew about the abuse but also participated.

“When he walked over to me while Pete Modica was sodomizing me and put his hand on my back and started masturbating, telling me to relax, I was just destroyed. I was destroyed,” said Windmann.

Windmann says he was eventually paid $450,000 in a confidential settlement with Jesuit High School.

“I didn’t go for money, I went for counseling and spiritual guidance and they were like nah here’s a whole bunch of money, shut up go away,” said Windmann.

Dozens of clergy named in Omaha abuse report; Lincoln Diocese waiting for task force review

LINCOLN (NE)
Lincoln Journal Star

November 30, 2018

By Peter Salter

The Catholic Diocese of Lincoln isn’t ready to identify priests or personnel accused of sexual abuse and misconduct with minors, it said Friday — the same day the Omaha Archdiocese named nearly 40 clergy members with substantiated claims leveled against them.

But in a statement, Lincoln Bishop James Conley said his diocese has fully cooperated with the attorney general’s office, which in late August asked the state’s three bishops to provide internal investigative records of abuse allegations since 1978.

Conley also said he was waiting for an independent task force — announced by the diocese in early November — to finish its own review of past sexual abuse and misconduct allegations, and how the diocese handled them.

“It would be premature to publish any information regarding clergy and diocesan personnel while the independent task force is in the midst of its review,” he said.

When did the Church know? Questions about allegations against Brian Boucher

CANADA
Global News

December 1, 2018

By Amanda Jelowicki

Father Brian Boucher’s trial lasted one week, with shocking testimony from two alleged victims, detailing horrific sexual abuse.

Also coming out of the trial are questions about when the church first learned of the allegations against Boucher, and why it took so long to arrest him.

A verdict is not expected until January. Meanwhile, those questions remain.

“The Roman Catholic Church has for a long time tried to put a lid on the cover of sex abuse by its priests,” said Carlo Tarini, a spokesman for the Quebec Association of Victims of Priests.

Boucher started working at the Our Lady of the Annunciation Church in TMR in 2005. That’s the year one alleged victim testified the abuse started. The victim was 12 at the time.

In his testimony, Boucher admitted he left the parish in 2014, before the end of his mandate. He left to undertake ecclesiastical studies in Washington.

Some parishioners told Global News they were surprised, saying the departure felt “abrupt.”

Priest accused of fondling teen girl in confessional will stand trial

MILWAUKEE (WI)
WISN Radio

November 30, 2018

By Nick Bohr

A 13-year-old girl claims Pastor Charles Hanel indecently touched her a year ago at Queen of Apostles Catholic Church in the city of Pewaukee.

She told her parents six months later, and Hanel was arrested.

A court commissioner Friday decided there was enough evidence for the case to proceed.

SNAP responds to list of priests

PARKERSBURG (WV)
The Intelligencer

December 1, 2018

By Jess Mancini

A support group for victims abused by priests says the Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston omitted the bishop who resigned earlier this year when it released a list of names this week.

However, the case on Bishop Michael Bransfield is a separate investigation, Tim Bishop, director of marketing and communications for the diocese, said.

“That investigation is still underway and we cannot comment further on it as it is still open,” he said.

Bransfield resigned in September, which was accepted by Pope Francis, amid allegations of the sexual harassment of adults. Archbishop William E. Lori of Baltimore was appointed apostolic administrator with the instruction to conduct an investigation of Bransfield.

On Thursday, the diocese released a list of priests with credible accusations against them.

“We appreciate this move by church officials in West Virginia, especially for including the names of priests who served in West Virginia, but were accused of abuse in dioceses outside Wheeling-Charleston,” said Judy Jones, Midwest regional leader of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests. “However, we cannot help but note the omission of Bishop Michael J. Bransfield, who has been accused of abusing at least one minor and resigned in September over allegations that he had sexually harassed a number of adults.”

Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston: Former Bishop Michael Bransfield Didn’t Belong on List

PARKERSBURG (WV)
The Intelligencer

December 1, 2018

The Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston said Friday it didn’t include its former bishop among lists it released the day before because allegations that he had sexually abused children were not credible.

“Allegations made against Michael Bransfield involving alleged charter issues took place while he was a priest in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia,” said Tim Bishop, director of marketing and communications at the diocese, about the former bishop. “The archdiocese concluded those allegations to be non-credible, they therefore were not added to the (Wheeling-Charleston) list. Any questions about that investigation should be forwarded to the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.”

During the 2012 criminal trial of two other priests in Philadelphia, two witnesses and a prosecutor alleged that Bransfield sexually abused children. Bransfield has denied those allegations.

“As is pertains to the current investigation of allegations against Bishop Michael Bransfield for the sexual harassment of adults: The allegation does not involve a charter issue and would not be listed for that reason,” the spokesman said.

The lists the diocese released Thursday afternoon included 31 priests who it said had been credibly accused of sexual abuse against minors or who had other credible allegations regarding the Charter for Protection of Young People. One list included priests who had been accused while serving in the diocese. A second list included clergy members who had a credible accusation and had worked in the diocese. However, those accusations had occurred elsewhere.

Hampden murder victim kept a journal at her priest’s direction.

BANGOR (ME)
Bangor Daily News

December 1, 2018

By Judy Harrison

Prosecutors from the state want a Hampden homicide victim’s spiritual journal to become evidence in their case against her alleged killer. But the priest who directed her to keep the journal says it should be treated as if he heard its contents in a confessional.

A superior court justice is set to decide whether the journal is evidence in the case against Renee Henneberry Clark’s alleged killer, her brother-in-law Philip Clark, after a Wednesday hearing on the prosecutors’ request.

Prosecutors want to read the diary to see if its contents can be used as evidence in their murder case against Clark.