ABUSE TRACKER

A digest of links to media coverage of clergy abuse. For recent coverage listed in this blog, read the full article in the newspaper or other media source by clicking “Read original article.” For earlier coverage, click the title to read the original article.

January 25, 2018

The pope is defending a bishop accused of witnessing abuse. What do his words mean to survivors?

UNITED STATES
PBS Newshour

January 23, 2018

[Includes video]

Pope Francis came under fire during a trip to Chile for defending a bishop accused of directly witnessing and covering up sexual abuse by another church figure, dating back to the 1980s. While the pope apologized for his wording, he stands by the bishop. Lisa Desjardins talks with Anne Barrett Doyle of BishopAccountability.org about what the pontiff’s words mean to victims and other Catholics.

Judy Woodruff:

The pope just concluded a trip to Chile this weekend, aimed at healing some of the after-effects of sexual abuse committed there.

But his remarks during that trip, and on his return from it, about the role of a bishop in a scandal there have raised questions.

Lisa Desjardins looks at the pope’s pledges to change the church’s actions and attitude.

Lisa Desjardins:

The cases in Chile date back to the 1980s and a well-connected priest found to be a pedophile, the Reverend Fernando Karadima.

Both the Vatican and a Chilean judge concluded those accusations were credible. The church defrocked him.

Why this matters now? Karadima was a longtime mentor to a current bishop, Juan Barros Madrid. He is accused of covering up and witnessing the abuse.

While in Chile to apologize for abuse by other priests, Pope Francis defended this bishop, saying there is not one shred of evidence against him.

That set off a firestorm. The pope apologized for his wording yesterday, but he also stood by the bishop.

Anne Barrett Doyle is the co-director of the watchdog group and web site BishopAccountability.org. And she joins me now.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Lawmakers want to give sex abuse victims from decades past the chance to file suit

HONOLULU (HAWAII)
Hawaii News Now

January 25, 2018

By Lynn Kawano

Hawaii lawmakers want to give more abuse victims the chance to come forward and file civil lawsuits, no matter how much time has passed.

Bills introduced in both the House and Senate failed last session, but a national movement to expose abusers and the high profile case against Kamehameha Schools could add momentum for the legislation.

Representative Linda Ichiyama and Senator Maile Shimabukuro introduced companion bills which would extend the window for lawsuits despite the statute of limitations.

“What we’re learning from data and research about trauma and what happens to a person’s brain when they undergo trauma is that they’re not ready to bring suits until much later,” says Ichiyama, “I think we need to adjust policies to reflect that research now that we know.”

More than a hundred victims came forward between 2012 and 2016, a four-year window that was opened for old sex abuse cases. Most of the cases involved catholic church priests and a psychiatrist who molested boys while they attended Kamehameha Schools.

Shimabukuro says national movements like the “#MeToo” campaign have also highlighted the need for victims to stand up and expose abusers.

“Less and less people are having shame for something that happened to them that wasn’t their fault,” says Shimabukuro.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Controversial proposal to compensate abusers who also were victims

AUSTRALIA
The Advertiser

January 25, 2018

By Miles Kemp

Some of the state’s worst paedophiles would be compensated for themselves being victims when they were children under a radical scheme proposed by the Victims of Crime Commissioner.

In his submission to legislation dealing with the fallout from the Royal Commission into child abuse in institutions, commissioner Michael O’Connell says their plight as abused children cannot be ignored.

“Redress is not about their crime (as an adult) but rather about their victimisation as children,’’ Mr O’Connell states in a submission he provided to The Advertiser.

“The redress scheme cannot be truly just, fair and equitable if some kinds of victims are ineligible.

“All (child) victims should count, including those who later became offenders.

“No child should ever experience that which inquiry after inquiry, victim story after victim story, have revealed happened”.

The controversial statements will reignite what the federal and state governments last year described as the “agonising” decision to exclude those victims who had gone on to abuse others.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Why Francis sometimes may be a prophet without honor in his own land

ROME (ITALY)
Crux

January 25, 2018

By John L. Allen Jr.

News Analysis

Pope Francis just concluded the 22nd international trip of his papacy, to Chile and Peru, and it says something about the media honeymoon he’s enjoyed up to now that it’s really the first such trip about which pundits and commentators could have a meaningful debate over whether it was a success or a failure.

It may also say something about the wisdom of Jesus’ saying, “A prophet is not without honor except in his native place, and among his own kin and in his own house,” that Francis’s first could-be flop came in South America. (I make the distinction here between South America and Latin America because the dynamics are often different in Central America.)

On the pope’s trip, controversy centered around Francis’s response to the clerical sexual abuse scandals in the Catholic Church, and specifically, his handling of the case of a bishop in Chile who’s been accused by victims of that country’s most notorious pedophile priest of knowing about their abuse and covering it up.

In a nutshell, Francis apologized to victims for the enormous wrongs they’ve suffered, and also reiterated his commitment to a “zero tolerance” policy. He met privately with victims, in order to hear their stories and to share their pain.

At the same time, he did not yield an inch on the case of Bishop Juan Barros, one of four Chilean prelates accused of being in on the cover-up. There’s been pressure on Francis to remove Barros ever since he named him to a small southern Chilean diocese in 2015, but the pope made crystal-clear that’s not going to happen.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

January 24, 2018

We have lived this story before. And yet, here we are

BOSTON (MA)
The Boston Globe

January 25, 2018

By Yvonne Abraham

Because nobody who currently runs the world of elite gymnastics can be trusted. Nobody in that world would protect Larry Nassar’s victims from his horrific sexual abuse. The days of testimony in a Michigan courtroom, which culminated in the doctor’s sentencing Wednesday, have laid bare the utter and cataclysmic failures of officials at USA Gymnastics, at Michigan State, and elsewhere, to keep the children in their care from harm.

Time and again, victims were doubted, their allegations ignored. Winning was everything.

“Your abuse started 30 years ago,” said Needham native and gold medalist Aly Raisman, testifying at the sentencing hearing on Friday. “If over these many years just one adult listened and had the courage and character to act . . . I and so many others would have never, ever met you.”

We have lived this story before. It has been 16 years since the Globe and others exposed the rampant, decades-long plague of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church. And yet here we are, as if none of it — nor any of the ensuing sexual scandals in other hallowed institutions — ever happened.

For decades, with the help of officials who required gymnasts to submit to his treatment, Nassar preyed on defenseless girls made more vulnerable by their dreams of winning gold medals in a sport that demanded perfection, and absolute compliance. So far, 150 women have come forward to say he molested them.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Chilean survivor of clergy sex abuse denies he is lying

UNITED STATES
National Catholic Reporter

January 24, 2018

By Heidi Schlumpf and Maria Benevento

Despite repeated accusations by Pope Francis that survivors of clergy sex abuse in Chile are guilty of “slander” and “calumny,” Juan Carlos Cruz is still speaking out about the abuse he suffered at the hands of a Chilean priest — and about the cover-up by church leaders there.

During his visit to Chile last week and on the papal plane Jan. 21, Pope Francis defended Bishop Juan Barros Madrid of Osorno, Chile, insisting there is no evidence the prelate ignored or covered up sexual abuse by Fr. Fernando Karadima.

But Cruz told NCR Jan. 23 that he and other survivors testified — in criminal, civil and church proceedings — that while “the bigger abuse was behind closed doors,” Barros was in the room when Karadima touched the genitals and put his tongue in the mouth of Cruz and other victims.

“That’s what Barros saw,” said Cruz, who now lives in Wilmington, Delaware. “I don’t know if I should have taken a photograph for more evidence. What other evidence than our testimony, and that of so many others, do they need?”

He believes it is impossible that Barros and others did not see the abuse. “They were standing by me when things happened,” Cruz said. “If they want to say they saw nothing, that is an absolute lie.”

Cruz and other victims of Karadima have testified in court and in letters sent to church officials that Barros and other church officials — including bishops Andrés Arteaga, an auxiliary in Santiago, Tomislav Koljatic of Linares, Chile, and Horacio Valenzuela of Talca, Chile — knew of the abuse and covered it up.

The Chilean bishops have consistently denied witnessing any abuse by Karadima or participating in a cover up. Barros and Valenzuela denied the accusations most recently in an interview with Cruxnow.com, in a story published Jan. 17.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Don’t compromise on protecting minors from abuse, pope says

VATICAN CITY (ITALY)
Catholic News Service via CatholicPhilly.com

January 24, 2018

[Includes link to related video]

Pope Francis said he told the bishops and priests of Chile to be uncompromising when it comes to protecting minors from sexual abuse and to trust that God will purify and renew his church during this time of trial.

Problems and conflicts must never be swept under the rug, he also said, because they can be resolved only through openness and dialogue.

At his weekly general audience Jan. 24 in St. Peter’s Square, the pope told an estimated 15,000 pilgrims and visitors about his Jan. 15-21 visit to Chile and Peru.

Thanking leaders, organizers and volunteers for all their hard work and generosity in contributing to a trip where “everything went well,” the pope also recognized the presence of protesters.

The protests made the theme of his visit to Chile, “I Give You My Peace,” even more relevant and timely, he said, as these words Jesus spoke to his disciples explain how he is the one and only source of peace for those who trust in him.

Some of the more “intense” moments of the trip, he said, were meetings with Chile’s priests, religious and bishops.

Those encounters were made “even more fruitful by the shared suffering over some of the wounds that afflict the church” there, he said. The pope had earlier asked forgiveness from those who were sexually abused by priests, but stood firm with his decision in 2015 to give a diocese to Bishop Juan Barros, who was accused of turning a blind eye to the abuse perpetrated by Father Fernando Karadima, his former mentor.

During his general audience at the Vatican, the pope said he emphasized to his brother bishops and priests that they must “reject every compromise with the sexual abuse of minors and, at the same time, trust in God, who through this difficult trial, purifies and renews his ministers.”

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

For Pope Francis, Fake News Goes Back to the Garden of Eden

ROME (ITALY)
The New York Times

January 24, 2018

By Jason Horowitz

The serpent in the Garden of Eden hissed the first fake news to Eve and it all went downhill from there, Pope Francis writes in a major document about the phenomenon of fake news released on Wednesday.

“We need to unmask what could be called the ‘snake-tactics’ used by those who disguise themselves in order to strike at any time and place,” the pope writes in a message ahead of what the church has designated as its World Day of Social Communications, in May.

Arguing that the “crafty” serpent’s effective disinformation campaign to get Eve to eat from the tree of knowledge “began the tragic history of human sin,” he adds, “I would like to contribute to our shared commitment to stemming the spread of fake news.”

Pope Francis has worn many hats since his election in 2013 — Vatican reformer; global advocate for refugees, the poor, and world peace; and, more recently, defender of bishops accused of covering up for pedophile priests.

But in a varyingly sophisticated, spiritual and questionable analysis of the fake news epidemic, the 81-year-old pontiff tried on the cap of contemporary media critic to address an issue that has wreaked havoc and undermined democracies from the United States to Europe and beyond.

In doing so, he offered a largely cleareyed assessment of the problem, its social impact, and the responsibility of social media giants and journalists. And he called on news consumers to break out of their comfortable echo chambers and cushy news feeds by seeking out different points of view.

But at times the pope also conflated fake news, which is politically or economically motivated disinformation, with an incremental and sensational style of journalism he dislikes — a muddying of the waters that many democracy advocates have worried is corrosive to a free press and to the ideal of an informed populace.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Nuns ‘sorry’ over Smyllum abuse claims

EDINBURGH (SCOTLAND)
BBC News

January 24, 2018

A nun in charge of a Catholic order has offered her “deepest and most sincere apologies” to anyone who may have been abused at Smyllum Park orphanage.

Sister Ellen Flynn said “horrifying” accounts of abuse at the Lanark care home were “totally against” everything the order stood for.

She was giving evidence at the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry in Edinburgh.

The inquiry has already heard weeks of evidence about the institution, which was shut in 1981.

One former resident, who was a child at the orphanage in the 1960s, has told the inquiry there was a “culture of evil among religious orders” at that time.

Record keeping

Sister Flynn – who broke down in tears during her testimony – said that her heart was with the survivors, as she vowed the order would engage with them and the probe to “put right what wrongs are found”.

The pledge came as she and another witness admitted a variety of historical failures had taken place at the home, including “weak” governance and record-keeping.

Dozens of former residents have testified that they received beatings and were mistreated at the home, run by the Daughters of Charity of St Vincent de Paul.

Sister Ellen, who is the current head of the order, said: “For those who are in distress, for those whom we have hurt in any way, our deepest and most sincere apologies.

“If we can do something about it, let us know.”

She and another nun, Sister Eileen Glancy – who also gave evidence – told the hearing that they wished to amend a previous apology because they now realised that there was “more than a possibility that some abuse had occurred” at Smyllum.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

We need to defeat the wolves: Interview with Peter Saunders

EUROPE
Political Critique

January 24, 2018

By Agata Diduszko-Zyglewska

Interview with Peter Saunders, the chief of The National Association for People Abused in Childhood (Great Britain) and a suspended member of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors and Vulnerable People that was created by Pope Francis.

Agata Diduszko-Zyglewska: You are a survivor of sexual abuse in childhood. Could you tell me what was your story?

Peter Saunders: Yes, I am from London. I was born in a place called Wimbledon in south-west London. I was the youngest of five children born into a good Catholic family, as we were called. The first time I was sexually assaulted it was at my Catholic primary school as a very small child by a head teacher. Many years later when I disclosed the abuse I found out that he had abused many children, but we hadn’t known about each other. Going back nearly 50 years, I remember how the head teacher suddenly disappeared from school. I found out, many years later, that some children had been able to tell to their parents what was happening. So the parents went to the bishop and that man… was sent to another school. A regular, normal pattern for Catholic institutions. Also very early in my life, at 7-8 years of age, I was sexually abused by a member of my family, which lasted until I was 14 years of age. When I went to my secondary school I was also sexually assaulted by two Jesuit priests. One of whom was a head teacher, who was a layman, and the other was a retired priest who lived on the school premises.

Concerning the head teacher’s involvement in the abuse in both schools, I suppose there must have been many more children harmed over the years.

Yes, when I got a lot of publicity three years ago, after meeting the Pope and after being appointed to the pontifical commission. People who I had not seen for a long time and some people I had never met, from my schools, emailed me to say that they had been abused by some of the same priests. Moreover, it turns out that one of my brothers who had been to the school six years before me had been abused by the retired priest too.

Didn’t any adult from your family know about it?

Nobody knew nobody said anything. I remained silent for the next 22-23 years.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Francis’ comments on allegations against Bishop Barros make little sense

UNITED STATES
National Catholic Reporter

January 24, 2018

By Michael Sean Winters Vatican

Reading Pope Francis’ comments at the press conference on the flight back to Rome, regarding clergy sex abuse and the allegations against Bishop Juan Barros Madrid, and rereading them again and again, I confess I cannot make heads or tails out of them.

Pope Francis said at one point: “The word ‘proof’ was not the best, I would rather say ‘evidence.’ In Barros’ case, I have studied and restudied, there is no evidence to condemn him. And if I condemned without evidence or moral certainty, I would commit a crime of bad judgment.”

Related: Francis again cries ‘calumny’ defending bishop accused of abuse cover-up
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Later, in response to a follow-up question, the pope said, “I must apologize for what the abused feel. The word ‘proof’ has hurt many of them. They say: Do I have to go look for a certification? I apologize to them if I hurt them without realizing it, I didn’t mean to. And it causes me so much pain, because I meet them: in Chile two meetings are known to the public, the others have not been disclosed. In every trip, there is always a chance to meet the victims, the meeting of Philadelphia went public, but not the other cases. To hear that the Pope tells them: ‘bring me a letter with proof, is a slap’ I realize that my expression didn’t come out very well, and I understand, as Peter writes in one of his letters, that the fire has risen. That’s what I can honestly say.”

When asked about the remarkable statement from Cardinal Sean O’Malley, in which the cardinal bluntly spoke of the hurt caused by the pope’s earlier comments on this case, Francis said: “O’ Malley said that the Pope has always used ‘zero tolerance’… Then there is that ‘bad choice of words,’ I spoke of calumny, to say of someone who says something with pertinacity without having evidence. If I say: you stole, and you have not stolen, then I am libeling, because I have no evidence. It was an unfortunate expression. But I have not heard any victim of Barros. They did not come, they did not show themselves, they did not give evidence in court. It’s all in the air. It is true that Barros was in Karadima’s group of young people. But let us be clear: if you accuse someone without evidence with pertinacity, that is calumny. However, if a person arrives and gives me evidence, I will be the first to listen to them. O’ Malley’s statement was very right, and I have thanked him. He spoke about the pain of victims in general.”

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

The Guilty Soul of Pope Francis

UNITED STATES
New York Review of Books

January 24, 2018

By Ariel Dorfman

There were certain words that Chileans were hoping that Pope Francis would say during his three-day visit to our country last week. They were hoping he would denounce the sexual abuse committed by members of the Catholic clergy, and particularly the offenses perpetrated by a corrupt and malevolent priest named Fernando Karadima. They were also waiting for Francis to condemn the hierarchs in the Catholic Church who had silenced and humiliated the victims and helped to cover up Karadima’s crimes. Above all, my compatriots wanted the pope to publicly chide Bishop Juan Barros, who had been Karadima’s protégé and, according to reports (denied by Barros), had witnessed his mentor’s pedophilia. The issue of Barros mattered symbolically because the pope himself, in 2015, had appointed this collaborator of Karadima’s as the bishop of Osorno, a city in southern Chile, in spite of angry complaints from the congregation.

In an op-ed I wrote for The New York Times that appeared just before the papal visit, I argued that, for Chileans, the way in which Francis handled this case would be a critical test of whether he could restore the prestige of the disgraced local Church, so wounded by these scandals, to the noble place it had held in public sympathy for decades because of its brave opposition to the military dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet (1973–1990). Pope Francis failed that test.

He did express “shame and pain” at the abuse of minors by members of the clergy, and he did hold a brief meeting with some of the victims—though not with any of those who had been mistreated by Karadima, or with anyone who has blamed Barros for his connivance. But Barros was flagrantly present at three ceremonies over which the pope officiated in Chile during the visit, and on one occasion, the pontiff embraced the bishop and kissed him on the cheek in a display of affection and support.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

January 23, 2018

Priest fights witness subpoena in child sex abuse trial: Clergy member claims alleged victim’s confession is confidential

ORLANDO (FL)
WKMG News 6

January 22, 2018

By Mike DeForest

Uncomfortable discussing a sensitive matter with her family, a teenage girl made an appointment with a priest to reveal a dark secret she had been carrying for years, according to prosecutors.

While taking part in the Catholic Church’s Sacrament of Reconciliation, commonly known as confession, prosecutors claim the girl disclosed to Rev. Vincenzo Ronchi that a relative had sexually abused her on several occasions beginning when she was 7 years old.

During that November 2014 confession, the girl reportedly urged the priest to keep their conversation private because she did not want her family or authorities to know about the molestation, court records state.

Two years later, however, the girl reported the sexual abuse to law enforcement officials.

As Loren Tim Burton now awaits trial on charges of sexual battery and child molestation, prosecutors say they need the priest’s testimony to put the defendant in prison for the rest of his life.

“As in the vast majority of child sexual abuses cases, there were no witnesses to the abuse,” prosecutors wrote in court papers. “The only evidence the State has to corroborate the victim’s testimony at trial is her ‘outcry’ statement (to Ronchi).”

The alleged victim, now an adult, has signed a waiver granting Ronchi permission to testify about their confidential conversation, court records show. But attorneys representing the clergy member are fighting to keep the priest off the witness stand, arguing that he is forbidden from disclosing anything discussed during confession.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Las causas donde aparece Juan Barros

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
La Tercera

>>>The causes where Juan Barros appears

January 19, 2018

By S. Rodríguez y S. Vedoya

En las investigaciones civiles y canónica sobre el caso Karadima se menciona a l obispo de Osorno, pero no existe ninguna causa específica en su contra.

“Ni en el juicio civil ni en el canónico hubo ninguna prueba. Eso es lo mínimo que cualquier ciudadano puede esperar de la justicia. Si me van a condenar de algo, pruébenlo y que la justicia lo considere válido. Eso, hasta el día de hoy, no ha existido en el caso del obispo Barros. El Papa exigió para un hermano obispo lo que exigimos para todos”, señaló Héctor Vargas, jefe de la diócesis de Temuco.

La opinión del prelado apunta directamente al centro del llamado “tema Barros”: si más allá de declaraciones, rumores, aprensiones, trascendidos y opi- niones existe alguna prueba e investigación concreta respecto del cuestionado obispo y su eventual encubrimiento de las conductas de Karadima. Los denunciantes aseguran que sí hay, en los expedientes ya conocidos sobre Karadima.

Respecto del ex párroco, condenado canónicamente de por vida por abusos sexuales, existen tres investigaciones formales. Una es la eclesiástica, que concluyó con su sanción, en 2011.

Otra fue la indagatoria penal, a cargo de la ministra en visita Jéssica González, que en noviembre de 2011 acreditó la existencia de abusos, pero que estaban prescritos.

En aquel fallo se menciona a Barros dos veces. Una es en el testimonio del religioso Juan Debesa, quien dijo que el ahora obispo apoyó que lo apartaran de los sacerdotes de El Bosque. “Un sábado en la noche estaban Karadima y los entonces seminaristas Andrés Arteaga, Juan Barros y otro que no recuerda, y se le reprochó su conducta por reunirse con personas que ellos no aprobaban”, se indica en el fallo.

La segunda mención está relacionada con la intención y gestiones que hizo Juan Carlos Cruz para ingresar al seminario y que no habrían sido apoyadas por Karadima. “Tampoco supo (el ex párroco) que el actual obispo Barros hubiese enviado al seminario una carta sobre el tema”, se sostiene.

En la indagatoria civil, en tanto, cuyo fallo fue dado a conocer el 16 de marzo de 2017, el ministro de fuero Juan Muñoz Pardo rechazó la demanda presentada por las víctimas del ex párroco de El Bosque, Juan Carlos Cruz, José Andrés Murillo y James Hamilton, en contra del arzobispo de Santiago.

En este documento, fundamentalmente en las declaraciones de los denunciantes, se menciona en múltiples ocasiones al obispo Juan Barros. Y cuando se le pregunta a Karadima su vínculo con el prelado, el sacerdote dijo que “él era de la Acción Católica e iba a verme a la parroquia y yo fui a verlo a Iquique. Una amistad muy sincera; él me consiguió un viaje a Francia, con el obispo de Louvre, para mis 50 años de sacerdocio”.

A la inversa, cuando se le consulta a Barros sobre la conducta de Karadima, el obispo de Osorno respondió que “yo no presencié los hechos, pero sí la sentencia de la Congregación de la Doctrina de la Fe los tuvo por efectivos y adhiero a eso (…)”.

Respecto de la situación de Barros, la especialista en Derecho Canónico de la U. de los Andes, Anastasía Assimakópulos, explicó que “en el sacramento del orden sagrado en el grado de obispo, el único que puede nombrar, trasladar, remover o aceptar una renuncia es el Papa”.

[Google Translation: In civil and canonical investigations on the Karadima case the Bishop of Osorno is mentioned, but there is no specific cause against him.

“Neither in the civil nor in the canonical trial was there any proof. That is the minimum that any citizen can expect from justice. If you are going to condemn me, prove it and that justice considers it valid. That, to this day, has not existed in the case of Bishop Barros. The Pope demanded for a brother bishop what we demand for all, “said Hector Vargas, head of the Diocese of Temuco.

The prelate’s opinion points directly to the center of the so-called “Barros theme”: if beyond declarations, rumors, apprehensions, transcendence and opinions, there is some concrete evidence and investigation regarding the questioned bishop and his eventual concealment of Karadima’s behavior. The complainants assure that there are, in the already known files on Karadima.

Regarding the former parish priest, canonically sentenced for life for sexual abuse, there are three formal investigations. One is the ecclesiastical, which concluded with its sanction, in 2011.

Another one was the criminal investigation, in charge of the minister in visit Jéssica González, who in November of 2011 credited the existence of abuses, but that they were prescribed.

In that ruling, Barros is mentioned twice. One is in the testimony of the religious Juan Debesa, who said that the now bishop supported to be separated from the priests of El Bosque. “One Saturday night were Karadima and the then seminarians Andrés Arteaga, Juan Barros and another who does not remember, and he was reproached for his behavior for meeting people they did not approve,” the ruling says.

The second mention is related to the intention and efforts made by Juan Carlos Cruz to enter the seminar and that would not have been supported by Karadima. “Nor did he know (the former parish priest) that the current Bishop Barros had sent a letter to the seminary on the subject,” he maintains.

In the civil investigation, meanwhile, whose ruling was released on March 16, 2017, the minister of jurisdiction Juan Muñoz Pardo rejected the lawsuit filed by the victims of the former pastor of El Bosque, Juan Carlos Cruz, José Andrés Murillo and James Hamilton, against the archbishop of Santiago.

In this document, fundamentally in the statements of the complainants, Bishop Juan Barros is mentioned on multiple occasions. And when Karadima was asked about his link with the prelate, the priest said that “he was from Catholic Action and he was going to see me at the parish and I went to see him in Iquique. A very sincere friendship; he got me a trip to France, with the Bishop of Louvre, for my 50 years of priesthood. ”

Conversely, when Barros was consulted about Karadima’s behavior, the bishop of Osorno replied that “I did not witness the events, but the sentence of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith took them to be effective and I adhere to that (…) “.

Regarding the situation of Barros, the specialist in Canon Law of the U. de los Andes, Anastasia Assimakopoulos, explained that “in the sacrament of sacred order in the degree of bishop, the only one who can name, transfer, remove or accept a renunciation is the Pope.”]

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Falta de recursos impidió querella contra Barros

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
La Tercera

>>>Lack of resources prevented a lawsuit against Barros

January 23, 2018

By Paula Yévenes and Camila Mardones

Abogado de las víctimas de Karadima dijo que por esto optaron por demandar civilmente a la Iglesia.

Las últimas declaraciones del Papa Francisco en el avión de regreso al Vaticano provocaron diversas reacciones. En la instancia, acompañado por los medios de comunicación, el Pontífice pidió perdón por sus dichos en su último día en Chile, donde respaldó la permanencia del obispo Juan Barros en la diócesis de Osorno y aseguró en esa ocasión que no se ha presentado ninguna “prueba” en su contra (ver nota páginas 2-3).

Pese a que los cuestionamientos al obispo comenzaron en 2015, a la fecha no se ha presentado ninguna acción legal en su contra a partir de las acusaciones que lo vinculan con el ex párroco de El Bosque Fernando Karadima.

Respecto de esta situación, el abogado de las víctimas de Karadima, Juan Pablo Hermosilla, explicó que todos los antecedentes respecto de lo que ocurría en la parroquia de El Bosque están a disposición del Vaticano. “El solo hecho de que Barros haya sido tan cercano a Karadima es un antecedente que habla por sí solo”, expresó.

Además, dijo que no se tomaron acciones en contra de Barros, ni de otros sacerdotes cercanos al ex párroco, porque “no teníamos los recursos para querellarnos en contra de todos ellos. Por eso, preferimos englobar todo en una sola acción, que fue la demanda civil contra la Iglesia”.

Y señaló que para sus defendidos todo el proceso ha significado un gran desgaste emocional. “Se está poniendo el peso del Vaticano a tres víctimas que han hecho un esfuerzo gigantesco. Es una falta de respeto, es una hipocresía”.

Reacciones divididas

Para algunos, la acción del Pontífice representó un gran gesto de humildad. Mientras que para otros, está lejos de ser suficiente para reparar el daño.

En cuanto a la frase donde el Pontífice sostiene que no puede destituir al prelado, porque estaría faltando a la presunción de inocencia, Juan Carlos Claret, vocero de la agrupación de Laicos de Osorno, manifestó que “el Papa no ha comprendido que su labor no es ser un tribunal, sino que un líder espiritual”. Y añadió que “ahora sabemos que él termina asumiendo la exclusiva responsabilidad sobre el nombramiento y permanencia de Juan Barros (…). Eso demuestra un acto de irresponsabilidad inhumano y cruel, porque prefirió sacrificar toda una diócesis y someter al propio Juan Barros a una situación que atañe contra su dignidad”.

Sin embargo, para el mundo católico la acción de Francisco “es una expresión de cercanía hacia las víctimas de abuso y un signo de humildad de un pastor que no tiene dificultad en reconocer que unas palabras suyas han herido a personas que ya han sufrido”. Así lo definió Jaime Coiro, secretario general de la Conferencia Episcopal. Y destacó que los dichos del Pontífice dejan la puerta abierta para presentar más evidencias, “Lo ha dicho el mismo Papa: tiene abierto su corazón a recibir cualquier antecedente que pueda surgir”.

[Google Translation: Lawyer for the victims of Karadima said that this is why they opted to sue the Church civilly.

The latest statements by Pope Francis on the plane back to the Vatican provoked various reactions. In the instance, accompanied by the media, the Pontiff apologized for his remarks on his last day in Chile, where he supported the stay of Bishop Juan Barros in the diocese of Osorno and assured on that occasion that no has been presented. test “against you (see note pages 2-3).

Although the questioning of the bishop began in 2015, to date no legal action has been filed against him based on the accusations linking him to the former pastor of El Bosque, Fernando Karadima.

Regarding this situation, the lawyer of the victims of Karadima, Juan Pablo Hermosilla, explained that all the information regarding what happened in the parish of El Bosque are available to the Vatican. “The mere fact that Barros has been so close to Karadima is an antecedent that speaks for itself,” he said.

In addition, he said that no action was taken against Barros, or other priests close to the former pastor, because “we did not have the resources to complain against all of them. Therefore, we prefer to include everything in a single action, which was the civil suit against the Church. ”
And he pointed out that for his defendants the whole process has meant a great emotional strain. “The Vatican’s weight is being placed on three victims who have made a gigantic effort. It’s a lack of respect, it’s hypocrisy. ”

Split reactions

For some, the action of the Pontiff represented a great gesture of humility. While for others, it is far from enough to repair the damage.

Regarding the sentence where the Pontiff maintains that he can not dismiss the prelate, because he would be missing the presumption of innocence, Juan Carlos Claret, spokesman of the Lajos de Osorno group, said that “the Pope has not understood that his work is not is to be a court, but a spiritual leader. ” He added that “now we know that he ends up assuming the exclusive responsibility for the appointment and permanence of Juan Barros (…). This demonstrates an act of inhuman and cruel irresponsibility, because he preferred to sacrifice an entire diocese and subject Juan Barros himself to a situation that concerns his dignity.”

However, for the Catholic world, Francisco’s action “is an expression of closeness towards victims of abuse and a sign of humility of a pastor who has no difficulty in recognizing that some of his words have hurt people who have already suffered.” This was defined by Jaime Coiro, general secretary of the Episcopal Conference. And he stressed that the Pontiff’s sayings leave the door open to present more evidence, “The Pope himself has said: he has opened his heart to receive any antecedent that may arise.”]

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Jesuitas Confirman Condena Contra Sacerdote Que Habría Abusado De Viñuela

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
La Nación

>>>Jesuits Confirm Sentence Against Priest Who Would Have Abused Viñuela

January 23, 2018

En 2012 se comenzó una investigación en contra del sacerdote, donde se determinó su culpabilidad, sin embargo, esto no se hizo público por petición de uno de los denunciantes.

A raíz de la denuncia de acoso sexual efectuada por el animador de MEGA, José Miguel Viñuela, contra un sacerdote jesuita, la Compañía de Jesús emitió un comunicado asegurando que el agresor, identificado como Jaime Guzmán Astaburuaga, fue condenado por la orden religiosa en el año 2012.

En el texto, se indicó que el delegado provincial de la congregación, Arturo Vigneaux, se reunió con el rostro televisivo para que informara lo sucedido y se invitó a las personas a entregar antecedentes contra el sacerdote.

[Google Translation: In 2012 an investigation was started against the priest, where his guilt was determined, however, this was not made public at the request of one of the complainants.

Following the complaint of sexual harassment carried out by the MEGA animator, José Miguel Viñuela , against a Jesuit priest , the Society of Jesus issued a statement assuring that the aggressor, identified as Jaime Guzmán Astaburuaga, was condemned by the religious order in the year 2012.

In the text, it was indicated that the provincial delegate of the congregation, Arturo Vigneaux, met with the television face to report what happened and people were invited to give background against the priest.

In addition, the Jesuits reported that in 2012 an investigation was carried out that “determined the culpability of Guzmán , who, at present, is serving the sentence imposed. This includes the prohibition of contact with minors and the restriction to publicly exercise the priestly ministry , “adding that this situation” was not made public by express request of one of the complainants.”

“We reiterate our commitment to act with the utmost diligence, collaborating with the competent civil and ecclesiastical institutions, by virtue of the care and transparency with the victims of abuse,” they remarked.]

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Victim Statements at Nassar Sentencing – Live Stream and Previous Days

DETROIT (MI)
ClickOnDetroit.com

January 23, 2018

Lansing, Mich. – The sentencing for former sports physician Larry Nassar will continue Tuesday morning in Lansing. Watch it live here.

View statements from previous days:

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

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Make Pres Safe

SAN JOSE (CA)
Make Pres Safe

January 22, 2018

[Note: Includes a petition, a timeline, and links to sources.]

Help Stop Decades of Sexual Misconduct at Presentation High School

The decisions by past and present Presentation High School administrators to ignore the laws designed to protect students from predators have resulted in the molestation and abuse of young girls entrusted to their care. Throughout the years, numerous teachers quit the school in protest, and suspected predators seemed immune to consequences even though administrators knew they were the target of sexual abuse complaints. Even today, PHS administrators refuse to accept responsibility for their actions or apologize to victims.

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Obispo Barros debe renunciar

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Cooperativa

>>>Bishop Barros must resign

January 23, 2018

By Sergio Bitar

Finalizada la visita del Papa en Chile ¿cuál es el diagnóstico que hará la iglesia chilena?, ¿qué conclusiones extraerá el Vaticano? Aunque no parece aconsejable intervenir en los temas internos de la iglesia, la visita del Papa la trasciende. Es un tema público.

Pensé y pienso que esta visita era una oportunidad para que los progresistas escucharan sus planteamientos sociales y políticos. Los pensamientos predicados por el Papa inspiran a muchas personas que comparten los valores de inclusión social y solidaridad, sustentabilidad ambiental, participación ciudadana y diversidad cultural.

Resultó decepcionante que esos planteamientos fueran casi silenciados por un manejo tan poco inteligente. Reapareció nuevamente una iglesia chilena que pone en primer plano los temas sexuales en lugar de los temas culturales, sociales y políticos.

[Google Translation: After the Pope’s visit to Chile, what is the diagnosis of the Chilean church? What conclusions will the Vatican draw? Although it does not seem advisable to intervene in the internal issues of the church, the Pope’s visit transcends it. It is a public issue.

I thought and I think that this visit was an opportunity for the progressives to listen to their social and political proposals. The thoughts preached by the Pope inspire many people who share the values ​​of social inclusion and solidarity, environmental sustainability, citizen participation and cultural diversity.

It was disappointing that these approaches were almost silenced by such an unintelligent management. A Chilean church reappeared that puts sexual issues in the foreground instead of cultural, social and political issues.

The behavior of Bishop Barros, questioned by members of the church, also receives the disapproval of the laity. Barros boasted of the support of the Curia and this hurt the feeling of thousands of Chileans.

Nor was the Pope’s stiff affirmation so supportive. One wonders who are the advisors that lead him to express himself in that way. The image of many brave priests and nuns, true shepherds, who deserve the respect of all, was damaged.

Undoubtedly there is a serious distancing of a part of the leadership of the Catholic Church and the feeling of Chilean citizenship. The same thing happens to political parties.

The difference is that, in the case of parties, it is spoken directly, sometimes the feeling of the majority is collected and the resignation of those who cause such damage is requested.

The Church is not immune to the obsolescence of certain ideas and behaviors, in a rapidly changing world, where people are more empowered, are more educated and aware, seek to be heard and establish a less vertical, closer relationship.

Pope Francis is making a great effort and has shown leadership to renew. His recognition of the error that meant asking for “proofs” is a gesture of humility.

But that is not enough if each national church is not updated and in our case, the Chilean Church.

If before there was a small group of questioners from Bishop Barros today there is a feeling of generalized disapproval, which will not leave him alone while he maintains that task. When performing public projection functions, it is not proceeded like a court of justice that fails after years, based on evidence. The general consequences are measured in society and in institutions. B ien har ed the bishop to resign to overcome this impasse.

I add to these words the strongest condemnation of criminals who burn churches. It is unacceptable and these facts can not go unnoticed, however intense the controversy that arose after the papal visit.]

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Pope partially apologizes to Chilean abuse victims, but still backs controversial bishop

WASHINGTON (DC)
Washington Post

January 23, 2018

By Rick Noack

It was supposed to be an apology tour, but Pope Francis’s Chile visit drew unexpected ire last week after the head of the Catholic Church came to the support of Juan Barros, a bishop accused of covering up sexual abuse committed by a priest named Fernando Karadima. The remarks came at the end of a visit that was intended to ease tensions between the church and Karadima’s victims.

On Monday, the pope apologized for previous remarks in which he had demanded evidence from Barros’s accusers, now saying that his words must have come across as a “slap in the face” of victims.

Despite his self-criticism, the pope stood by Barros and also warned accusers that they may be found guilty of slander if they continued to make public statements without being able to provide evidence.

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Smyllum resident wants church held responsible for abuse

GLASGOW (SCOTLAND)
BBC

January 23, 2018

Leon Carberry spoke to BBC Scotland via Skype after giving evidence to the inquiry
A retired police officer has called for the Catholic Church to be held responsible for the sexual and physical abuse he suffered at a Lanarkshire orphanage during the 1950s.

Leon Carberry said he was regularly beaten and humiliated by a nun at the Smyllum Park home in Lanark.

He also claimed that a man who worked there made him perform a sex act.

Mr Carberrry said nuns lied to him about his brother’s death and he still does not know where he is buried.

The former policeman, who has waived his right to anonymity, was giving evidence to the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry via video link from Australia.

His brother David died aged four while living at Smyllum in 1955.

In an interview with BBC Scotland after giving evidence, Mr Carberry said physical abuse was administered either by using straps, a hairbrush or a stick during exercise periods.

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Pope apologises to sex abuse victims but repeats defence of bishop accused of protecting priest

LONDON (ENGLAND)
The Telegraph

January 22, 2018

Pope Francis apologised for comments he made about victims of paedophile clergy during his trip to South America, but repeated his defence of a bishop accused of protecting a predatory priest.

The Pope issued the partial mea culpa on board the plane that flew him back to Rome after a grueling week-long trip to Chile and Peru.

During his visit to Chile, he had insisted that there was no evidence that Bishop Juan Barros was complicit in keeping quiet about the sexual abuse carried out by a priest, the Rev. Fernando Karadima.

The Pope sharply told journalists: “The day I see proof against Bishop Barros, then I will talk. There is not a single piece of evidence against him. It is all slander. Is that clear?”

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Former Catholic priest, acquitted of abuse, granted custody of son

BIRMINGHAM (AL)
AL.com

January 22, 2018

By Greg Garrison

A former EWTN priest and TV personality found not guilty of child sexual abuse in 2016 has been granted custody of his 9-year-old son.

David Stone, 57, hosted a talk show for youth from 2001-2007 on EWTN. While working at EWTN he fathered a child with an EWTN employee, Christina Presnell. The child was born in 2008.

Stone, formerly known as Father Francis Mary Stone when he hosted the TV show “Life on the Rock,” was suspended from his religious order and placed on long-term leave of absence at EWTN after it became known he had fathered the child. Presnell was fired from EWTN.

After the child spent a weekend visitation with Stone in 2012, the child complained to his mother that his father hurt him, according to testimony by Presnell. Presnell then refused to allow the next scheduled visitation.

Stone was arrested in 2013 and charged with sexual abuse of a minor under 12. Stone testified and his attorneys argued that false allegations were being used to gain advantage in a custody dispute between Stone and Presnell.

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Pope Apologizes to Abuse Victims but Again Doubts Them

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Times

January 22, 2018

By Jason Horowitz

Rome – For years, victims of sexual abuse in the Roman Catholic Church and their advocates have asked when Pope Francis would adjust his blind spot on an issue that has caused enormous damage to Catholics, the reputation of the church and the pontiffs who preceded him.

But the pope’s remarks overnight Sunday as he returned from a trip to Chile and Peru — apologizing for demanding proof of abuse from victims in Chile even as he continued to doubt them — prompted concerns that he just does not understand.

“There was great hope that this pope understood — he ‘got it’ — but if that were true we would not have his words today,” said Marie Collins, a survivor of abuse who last year resigned in frustration from the pope’s Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors.

“Anyone who was still clinging to the hope there would be real change in the church to the issue of abuse and this change would be led by Pope Francis will have lost that hope today,” Ms. Collins said.

At this point in his papacy, some supporters worry that the pope’s lackluster record on holding the church hierarchy accountable for its role in the abuse crisis could threaten to erode the moral authority and global popularity necessary for the pope to make progress on priorities in and out of the church.

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Presentation High Alums Launch Website to Tell Stories of Sexual Misconduct in Their Own Words

SAN JOSE (CA)
NBC Bay Area – KNTV

January 22, 2018

By Michael Bott and Vicky Nguyen

A website launched by graduates of Presentation High School, a San Jose Catholic school for girls, details a timeline of sexual harassment and abuse allegations going all the way back to 1984

Graduates of a prestigious San Jose Catholic school for girls who say they were victims of sexual misconduct have launched a website to tell their stories in their own words.

The “Make Pres Safe” website includes a timeline spanning three decades that details each allegation of misconduct at Presentation High School. The site, which includes the personal statements of many accusers, blames school administrators for failing to report many of the allegations to police or Child Protective Services when they were brought to the school’s attention.

The driving forces behind the website are Kathryn Leehane and Cheryl Hodgin Marshall, who graduated from the school nearly three decades ago and say school administrators failed to act when they came to them with separate stories of abuse. They worked with San Jose attorney Robert Allard and his team of investigators, who have not sued the school but are actively looking into multiple claims of sexual misconduct.

Leehane, whose essay in the Washington Post last year recounted how she was groped, kissed, and shown a pornographic photo by Spanish teacher John Fernandez in 1990, was the first Presentation graduate to go public with her story. Her essay, which she says was meant to bring personal closure, ended up sparking a social media firestorm and prompted other graduates to come forward with their own stories. Leehane said she told current Principal Mary Miller about what happened to her on separate occasions in 1993 and 1994, but police were never notified, and the teacher was allowed to teach at the school until he retired in 2004. Fernandez died of cancer in 2015.

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January 22, 2018

Contrite pope apologises for sexual abuse comments that ‘wounded many’

EN ROUTE TO VATICAN CITY
Reuters

January 22, 2018

By Philip Pullella

Pope Francis, in an extremely rare act of self-criticism, apologised to victims of clerical sex abuse on Sunday, acknowledging he had “wounded many” in comments defending a Chilean bishop who is under scrutiny.

But while the pope said he was sorry for his choice of words and tone of voice when he testily answered a reporter’s question last Thursday in Chile, he also said he was certain that the prelate, Juan Barros, was innocent.

“I have to apologise,” an unusually contrite pope told reporters aboard the plane returning to Rome from a week-long trip to Chile and Peru, saying he realised he had “wounded many people who were abused”.

“I apologise to them if I hurt them without realising it, but it was a wound that I inflicted without meaning to,” he said. “It pains me very much.”

In the latest twist to a saga that has gripped Chile, Francis said Barros, who is accused of protecting a notorious paedophile, would remain in his place in the diocese of Osorno because there currently was no credible evidence against him.

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Pope apologizes to sex abuse victims, defends accused Chilean bishop

EN ROUTE TO VATICAN CITY
Catholic News Service

January 22, 2018

By Junno Arocho Esteves

Pope Francis apologized to victims of clergy sex abuse, saying he unknowingly wounded them by the way he defended a Chilean bishop accused of covering up abuse by his mentor.

Speaking with journalists on his flight to Rome from Lima, Peru, Jan. 21, the pope said he only realized later that his words erroneously implied that victims’ accusations are credible only with concrete proof.

“To hear that the pope says to their face, ‘Bring me a letter with proof,’ is a slap in the face,” the pope said.

Pope Francis was referring to a response he gave in Iquique, Chile, Jan. 18 when local reporters asked about his support for Bishop Juan Barros of Osorno, given accusations that the bishop may have been aware of abuse perpetrated by his former mentor, Father Fernando Karadima. The priest was sentenced to a life of prayer and penance by the Vatican after he was found guilty of sexually abusing boys.

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Pope regrets word choice on abuse in Chile, but stands by contested bishop

EN ROUTE TO VATICAN CITY
Crux

January 22, 2018

By Inés San Martín

Returning to Rome from a sometimes contentious six-day trip to Latin America, Pope Francis said he regretted the language he used along the way regarding sexual abuse victims who have accused a Chilean bishop of covering up their abuse, but did not back down from his support for that bishop.

Francis said he’s convinced of the innocence of Chilean Bishop Juan Barros, who has been accused by survivors of covering up cases of sexual abuse by infamous Chilean priest Fernando Karadima, who was found guilty by a church process in 2011.

Barros “will stay in his post, I cannot condemn him without evidence,” the pope said during the flight from Peru to Rome.

“I personally am convinced that he’s innocent,” Francis said.

The pope did, however, express regret for how he made that point in Chile.

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Pope Francis asks forgiveness from sexual abuse victims but reaffirms support for Bishop Barros

NEW YORK (NY)
America Magazine

January 22, 2018

By Gerard O’Connell

In an hour-long press conference on the plane from Lima to Rome, Jan. 21, Pope Francis asked pardon from the victims of sexual abuse by priests or religious for his use of words that offended them in his remarks about Bishop Juan Barros of Osorno, Chile. But he also reaffirmed his support for Bishop Barros, saying he has not received any evidence against him.

On Thursday Jan. 18, the pope told reporters on a plane flight in Chile, “The day they bring me proof against the bishop, then I will speak. There is not a single proof against him. This calumny! Is that clear?” Francis stated.

Responding to a question from a Chilean journalist today, Pope Francis spoke of “what the abused feel” regarding his remark.

“I must ask pardon [from them] because the word ‘proof’ has hurt many of the abused, and [what] I meant to ask for was ‘evidence.’ I ask forgiveness. It’s a hurt [caused] without wishing it,” Pope Francis said.

“I know that there are many abused people who cannot bring proof; they do not have it. Or they cannot [produce it], or at times they have it, but they are ashamed and that stops them, and they suffer in silence. The drama of abused persons is tremendous.”

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After Pope Francis outrages sex abuse victims, top adviser questions pope’s words

NEW YORK (NY)
America Magazine

January 20, 2018

By Michael J. O’Loughlin

Seán O’Malley, the top adviser to Pope Francis on issues of clerical sexual abuse, weighed in on remarks made by the pope this week defending a controversial Chilean bishop that caused outrage to victims of sexual abuse. The Boston archbishop expressed support for victims and warned against using language that casts doubt on their stories.

“It is understandable that Pope Francis’ statements yesterday in Santiago, Chile were a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse by clergy or any other perpetrator,” the Boston archbishop said in a statement released Saturday morning. “Words that convey the message ‘if you cannot prove your claims then you will not be believed’ abandon those who have suffered reprehensible criminal violations of their human dignity and relegate survivors to discredited exile.”

Cardinal O’Malley said his “prayers and concern will always be with the survivors and their loved ones.”

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Dismissive words on abuse scandal cast pall over pope’s trip

LIMA (PERU)
Associated Press

En español: Unas polémicas declaraciones empañan la gira papal por Sudamérica

January 22, 2018

By Christine Armario

Pope Francis ventured into the Amazon to demand rights for indigenous groups, decried the scourge of corruption afflicting the region’s politics and denounced a culture of “machismo” in which violence against women is too often tolerated.

Yet his latest visit to South America is likely to be remembered most for 27 dismissive words that sparked outrage among Chileans already angry over a notorious clerical abuse scandal and haunted the rest of his trip.

“That is the enigma of Pope Francis,” Anne Barrett Doyle of the online abuse database BishopAccountability.org said Sunday. “He is so bold and compassionate on many issues but he is an old school defensive bishop when it comes to the sex abuse crisis.”

Even before Francis landed in Chile for the first leg of his two-country trip, the pontiff’s visit seemed ripe for contention. Vandals fire-bombed three churches in the capital of Santiago, warning in a leaflet that “the next bombs will be in your cassock,” and an angry group protesting the high cost of hosting him briefly occupied the Nunciature where he would sleep.

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Guam archbishop denies allegations of rape, sexual abuse

HAGATNA (GUAM)
Catholic News Agency via Crux

January 21, 2018

An embattled archbishop in Guam has denied an allegation that he raped his nephew nearly 20 years ago, when his accuser was a teen.

Mark Apuron, nephew of Guam’s Archbishop Anthony Apuron, filed a lawsuit Jan. 10, claiming that his uncle raped him in a Church bathroom in 1989 or 1990. This is the fifth lawsuit to accuse the archbishop of sexual abuse of minors during his time as a pastor and bishop.

“God is my witness: I deny all allegations of sexual abuse made against me, including this last one,” wrote Apuron in a Jan. 18 statement, according to Guam Pacific Daily News.

“All of these allegations have been mentored and promoted by the same source and this one seems particularly timed to influence the verdict of the Vatican trial conducted by the Holy See, as a last resort out of fear that I may be exonerated,” he continued.

In addition to this claim, Apuron faces four other accusations from former altar boys, who charged the archbishop with abuse in the 1970s when he served as a parish priest in Agat. The first allegations against the archbishop were made public in May 2016. Mark’s attorney, David Lujan, said that his client was too ashamed and embarrassed to tell his family about the alleged abuse until recently.

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Cardinal Sean O’Malley chastises Pope Francis on Chile abuse: Says comments ‘abandon’ survivors

BOSTON (MA)
Boston Herald

January 21, 2018

By Brian Dowling

Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley, a top adviser to Pope Francis, rebuked the pontiff’s disparaging remarks targeting Chilean abuse claims, saying the comments “abandon” survivors of the church’s sex abuse crisis to “discredited exile.”

In a strongly worded statement rebuking Francis’ comments, Boston’s archbishop said the remarks were clearly “a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse by clergy or any other perpetrator.”

“Words that convey the message ‘if you cannot prove your claims then you will not be believed’ abandon those who have suffered reprehensible criminal violations of their human dignity and relegate survivors to discredited exile,” O’Malley said in a statement.

Francis was leaving Chile Thursday when he accused victims of the country’s most notorious pedophile priest of having slandered another bishop, Juan Barros, by claiming Barros covered up the abuse from the Rev. Fernando Karadima.

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Cardinal O’Malley speaks out against pope’s comment to sex abuse victims in Chile

BOSTON (MA)
Boston Globe

January 20, 2018

By Evan Allen

Cardinal Sean O’Malley issued a strongly worded statement Saturday reproaching Pope Francis for the pontiff’s accusations in Chile last week that victims of a pedophile priest in that country were slandering a bishop they say covered up the case.

“Words that convey the message ‘if you cannot prove your claims then you will not be believed’ abandon those who have suffered reprehensible criminal violations of their human dignity and relegate survivors to discredited exile,” O’Malley said.

Local abuse victims and advocates, however, said that it is action, not talk, that is important, and the cardinal’s words did not go far enough.

“People in the survivor community are not looking for prayers and words of sympathy,” said Phil Saviano, an abuse victim who founded the New England chapter of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests. “We’re looking for them to actually do something.”

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Cardinal rebukes pope over Chile ‘slander’ comments on abuse

LIMA (PERU)
Associated Press via Washington Post

January 20, 2018

By Nicole Winfield

Pope Francis’ top adviser on clerical sex abuse implicitly rebuked the pontiff for having accused Chilean victims of slander, saying Saturday that his words were “a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse.”

Cardinal Sean O’Malley, the archbishop of Boston, said he couldn’t explain why Francis “chose the particular words he used.” He said such expressions had the effect of abandoning victims and relegating them to “discredited exile.”

In an extraordinary effort at damage control, O’Malley insisted in a statement that Francis “fully recognizes the egregious failures of the church and its clergy who abused children and the devastating impact those crimes have had on survivors and their loved ones.”

Francis set off a national uproar upon leaving Chile on Thursday when he accused victims of the country’s most notorious pedophile priest of having slandered another bishop, Juan Barros. The victims say Barros knew of the abuse by the Rev. Fernando Karadima but did nothing to stop it — a charge Barros denies.

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Pope Lauds Peru’s Young, but Stays Silent on Church Sex Abuse

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Times

January 21, 2018

By Marcelo Rochabrún and Andrea Zarate

On the last day of his visit here, Pope Francis told Peruvians that they lived in a “sainted land” and commended young people for keeping their faith in the church.

But he did not address the elephant in the room: a scandal involving a powerful Roman Catholic group here, where dozens of former members say they were physically and sexually abused after dedicating their lives to prayer and worship.

The issue of sexual abuse in the church has loomed large over Francis’ weeklong visit to Chile and Peru, where he discussed the plights of indigenous populations in the jungle and of those recovering from catastrophic flooding in Peru’s sandy desert coast.

Francis did confront the issue of abuse last week in Chile, where accusations against the Rev. Fernando Karadima, a pedophile priest, have damaged the church. But after first issuing an apology for the abuse, Francis called accusations of a cover-up by a bishop “all slander.” Those remarks prompted a rare rebuke from Cardinal Sean P. O’Malley, who is charged with working to improve the church’s handling of child abuse cases.

In Peru, Francis was mute on the subject.

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January 21, 2018

El papa Francisco en tierra de nadie

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Times (en español)

>>>Pope Francis in no man’s land

January 21, 2018

By Rafael Gumucio

Santiago – Este es un país muy desconfiado. La presidenta Michelle Bachelet se lo advirtió al papa Francisco no bien pisó Chile el 15 de enero. Cuatro días de visita por el centro, sur y extremo norte del país no bastaron para disipar esa desconfianza. En Chile, Francisco se convirtió en la prueba viva de que no hay nada más estrecho que el ancho camino del medio: en su breve pontificado ha logrado defraudar las esperanzas de conservadores y progresistas.

En cinco años, el papa ha visitado países de mayoría musulmana, judía, protestante, y ateos, todos ellos con razonable público y sin demasiados escándalos. En Chile enfrentaba quizás un reto mayor. Los chilenos, como muchas sociedades que han prosperado bruscamente, no solo han perdido la fe, sino que la han remplazado por un cada vez más activo anticlericalismo. Los 80 casos conocidos de abuso sexual perpetrados por miembros del clero en Chile le han dado alas a un sentimiento antirreligioso que tiene su manifestación más extrema en la quema de iglesias en el sur de Chile, presuntamente a manos de grupos mapuches.

La Iglesia chilena necesitaba un milagro de Francisco. El primer discurso del papa en el Palacio de la Moneda parecía una señal astuta y equilibrada de que había comprendido la dimensión del desafío. Francisco empezó su visita citando a Gabriela Mistral para alabar los logros de la democracia chilena. Sin demorarse ni un minuto pidió perdón a las víctimas de los abusos sexuales, usando sin eufemismo la palabra “vergüenza” para calificar lo que la Iglesia debía sentir ante la reiteración de esos casos.

[Google Translation: This is a very distrustful country. President Michelle Bachelet warned Pope Francis as soon as he stepped on Chile on January 15. Four days of visits to the center, south and far north of the country were not enough to dispel this distrust. In Chile, Francisco became the living proof that there is nothing narrower than the broad middle way: in his brief pontificate he managed to defraud the hopes of conservatives and progressives.

In five years, the pope has visited countries of Muslim, Jewish, Protestant, and atheist majority, all of them with reasonable public and without too many scandals. In Chile he faced perhaps a greater challenge. Chileans, like many societies that have prospered abruptly, not only have lost faith , but have replaced it with an increasingly active anticlericalism. The 80 known cases of sexual abuse perpetrated by members of the clergy in Chile have given wings to an anti-religious sentiment that has its most extreme manifestation in the burning of churches in southern Chile , presumably at the hands of Mapuche groups.

The Chilean Church needed a miracle from Francisco. The pope’s first speech at the Palacio de la Moneda seemed a clever and balanced sign that he had understood the dimension of the challenge. Francisco began his visit by quoting Gabriela Mistral to praise the achievements of Chilean democracy. Without waiting for a minute, he apologized to the victims of the sexual abuse, using without euphemism the word “shame” to describe what the Church should feel about the repetition of those cases.

In an equally astute way, Francisco began his visit just where the one of Juan Pablo II, 31 years ago, had failed in the most resounding way. In the O’Higgins Park, the Polish Pope saw from the altar how his parishioners faced with the police of the dictatorship. His attempts to calm the crowd were useless. More than 600 people were injured in the fray. Francisco, in the same place, greeted a calm and happy crowd of more than 400,000 people. Right there, however, he finished his honeymoon with the Chileans. The television cameras caught Bishop Juan Barros Madrid among the participants of the mass , indicated by the victims of Father Karadima as a cover-up for sexual abuse.

[Display Type: Pope Francis has been unable to connect with the heart of either of the two churches that divide the heritage of St. Peter and St. Paul, the progressive and the conservative.]

The resisted bishop of Osorno suddenly took away any visibility from the pope, who confirmed again his confidence in the innocence of the prelate and his anger against anyone who doubted him. The tears that he would have shed in a private encounter with anonymous victims of the clergy’s sexual abuse failed to calm the uncomfortable questions and the uncomfortable emplacements that followed him in every place where his slow walk and tired smile tried to reach him. The pope, who was supposed to come to give us his peace, ended up trying to slander anyone who dares to question Barros. An abrupt “Is that clear?” left the question settled. The Pope of simplicity was once again the authoritarian and determined Cardinal Bergoglio who so feared his Argentine Jesuit brothers.

Neither Temuco nor Iquique nor Maipú managed to fill the immense esplanades that awaited him. His use of Argentine lunfardo or his attempts to introduce juvenile jargon – he spoke of “vocational selfie ” – or popular to his speeches failed to seduce more than those who were already convinced in advance. The Pope of all was, in the end, nobody’s pope; the shame that he expressed feeling for sexual abuse ended up infecting his entire visit, considered by the most varied vaticanistas the most disastrous of which he has undertaken.

In Chile, the tragedy that has marked the entire papacy of Francisco, its inability to reconcile what remains of the Church of John XXIII with the still almighty Church of John Paul II, was staged with special cruelty. In the seventies and eighties the theology of liberation sowed and harvested bishops, priests, thinkers and martyrs throughout Chile. John Paul II punished with special zeal this Church of the poor organized into very active grassroots communities. Since then, the Chilean Church spent all the prestige gained in the dictatorship in trying to prevent the law of divorce, equal marriage or any type of abortion. During his visit, Francisco ignored any of these topics. The conservative hierarchy left by the Polish pope did not fail to note that signal.

For the conservatives, Francisco will always be a Jesuit more concerned with the life of women in prison than with the rights of unborn fetuses. For the progressives, however, Francisco has not ceased to be the pope who defends Bishop Barros, representative of everything that has led the people away from the churches: not only sexual abuse but a distant and courtly style that prefers to remain well with the hierarchy that calm the anxieties of their parishioners. The pope, who wants shepherds with the smell of sheep, ended up defending one that smells of expensive Vatican perfume. Francisco ended up being the face of a Church that imposes from above appointments resisted by the faithful.

The humility of the customs of this Pope does not fit his impatient and derogatory character that does not bite his tongue to condemn and that is rather more cautious when it comes to celebrating. Unable to connect with the heart of one of the two churches that divide the heritage of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, the progressive and the conservative, he has achieved what is supposed to be his land, Latin America, to be a perfect stranger.

Rafael Gumucio is a Chilean writer and directs the Institute of Humor Studies of the Diego Portales University in Santiago. His most recent novel is “The imperfect heartthrob”.]

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La gira en Chile del Papa se convierte en la peor de sus cinco años de pontificado

BUENOS AIRES (ARGENTINA)
Clarin

>>>The Pope’s tour in Chile becomes the worst of his five years of pontificate

January 18, 2018

By Sergio Rubin

La visita tuvo menos presencia de fieles en los actos de lo que se esperaba. Los casos de pedofilia fueron gravitantes en el desánimo.

Todos los indicios preanunciaban un viaje complicado. Acaso el más complicado de todos los que Francisco realizó hasta ahora en sus casi cinco años de pontificado. Porque, a diferencia de otras visitas donde la situación política de cada país desafiaba su capacidad de maniobra, el paso por Chile implicaba críticas o, al menos, indiferencia hacia él mismo y, ante todo, hacia la propia Iglesia chilena. Y efectivamente no la tuvo fácil aquí, el país de América Latina donde menos se valora a Francisco y a la Iglesia católica, y que más fieles perdió: el acompañamiento de la gente fue claramente menor del que se esperaba, sus palabras no tuvieron el habitual impacto y tampoco se acallaron las críticas.

El contraste más evidente fue con el viaje a Colombia, en setiembre pasado: Francisco había jugado fuerte a favor de los acuerdos de paz con la guerrilla de las FARC, un asunto que divide profundamente a los colombianos (hace poco más de un año ganó por poco el rechazo a ellos) y todo llevaba a pensar que la mitad de los colombianos en cierta forma le daría la espalda. Pero su visita –más allá de la suerte de esos acuerdos- fue todo un éxito en cuanto a la respuesta popular y la atención con que se siguió sus prédica por la reconciliación. Dicho sea de paso, más de un observador la tomó como una suerte de anticipo de su mensaje a favor del cierre de la grieta en una eventual visita a su país.

[Google Translation: The visit had less presence of faithful in the acts of what was expected. The cases of pedophilia were gravitating in discouragement.

All the signs forewarned a complicated journey. Perhaps the most complicated of all that Francisco did so far in his almost five years of pontificate. Because, unlike other visits where the political situation of each country challenged its ability to maneuver, the passage through Chile implied criticism or, at least, indifference towards himself and, above all, towards the Chilean Church itself. And indeed it was not easy here, the country of Latin America where Francisco and the Catholic Church are least valued, and which most lost: the accompaniment of the people was clearly lower than expected, his words did not have the usual impact and criticisms were not silenced either.

The most obvious contrast was the trip to Colombia, last September: Francisco had played hard in favor of peace agreements with the FARC guerrillas, an issue that deeply divides Colombians (a little over a year ago he won by little the rejection to them) and everything led to think that half of the Colombians would somehow turn their backs on him. But his visit – beyond the fate of these agreements – was a success in terms of the popular response and the attention with which he followed his preaching for reconciliation. Incidentally, more than one observer took it as a sort of foretaste of his message in favor of closing the crack in an eventual visit to his country.

Now: There is not a single factor that explains why Francisco was not like in other countries. It is true that the case of abuses committed by clerics wreaked havoc especially in the image of the Chilean Church, but also in that of Francisco himself for having named in 2015 bishop of Osorno a prelate accused of covering up the abuses committed by the father Fernando Karadima – the main exponent of these crimes within the Chilean Church – given that for years he was his collaborator in a church in Santiago. But Francisco always defended with emphasis his innocence like yesterday in Iquique before the journalists: “There is not a single test against him, everything is a slander,” he said.

To this we must add the blurring of the once great commitment with the poor that the Chilean Church had, in addition to having been an emblem of the struggle for human rights during the last military dictatorship.

There is no shortage of those who believe that the powerful secretary of state of the Vatican in the second half of the pontificate of John Paul II, the controversial Cardinal Angelo Sodano, was delineating a very conservative Church – and lack of leadership – since his previous visit to the country as Nuncio . And, of course, also the criticisms of the original peoples against the Catholic Church for their role in the conquest.

Finally, there is a fundamental factor: the loss of the religiosity of Chilean society, a drastic phenomenon of the last decades, which did not take place – at least with that intensity – when John Paul II was here almost 31 years ago. Contrary to Central America or Brazil, where the Catholic Church loses the faithful at the expense of evangelical churches, in Chile -although there is a certain evangelical advance- its main challenge is atheism and agnosticism. And, in this sense, it begins to “compete” with Uruguay, the least religious country in the region.

The cultural change in Chile – a country with a Catholic trajectory, unlike Uruguay – is, then, the great underlying problem of the Catholic Church and, of course, of other religions. Is it a process that will be confined to Chileans or that will encompass other peoples as young people -the less religious- reach adults and there is some economic improvement as in the trans-Andean country?

However, it should not be disregarded that Francisco gathered 400 thousand faithful in the O’Higgins park in Santiago, which captivated the most committed faithful, who had very nice gestures like marrying two crew members in mid-flight to Iquique. Perhaps the balance of the trip now requires a look in greater perspective.]

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Key cardinal rebukes pope over abuse comment in rare move

TRUJILLO (PERU)
Reuters

January 20, 2018

By Philip Pullella and Caroline Stauffer

A key U.S. cardinal distanced himself on Saturday from comments by Pope Francis on sexual abuse, saying they had caused “great pain,” a remarkable move pointing to divisions in the Roman Catholic Church over how to treat accusers.

The implicit public rebuke of the pope by one of his top advisers came after two days of pointed attacks from victims and their advocates, and was another setback for Francis’ attempts to come to grips with sexual abuse in the Church.

Cardinal Sean O‘Malley of Boston said in an unusually blunt statement that “it is understandable” that the pope’s comments in Chile on Thursday were “a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse by clergy or any other perpetrator.”

* * *

O‘Malley’s statement on the pope’s choice of language said: “Words that convey the message ‘if you cannot prove your claims, then you will not be believed’ abandon those who have suffered reprehensible criminal violations of their human dignity and relegate survivors to discredited exile.”

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O’Malley’s ‘rebuke’ of pope on sex abuse stirs wide reaction

DENVER (CO)
Crux

January 21, 2018

By Inés San Martín

Lima, Peru – It’s not every day that a close ally and adviser to a pope, not to mention a cardinal of the Catholic Church, distances himself from that pope. So when Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston said Saturday night it was “understandable” that Francis’s language in Chile about abuse victims accusing a bishop of a cover-up had caused “great pain,” it was bound to stir reaction.

Peter Saunders, a survivor of clerical sexual abuse and a former member of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors – an advisory body created by Pope Francis in 2014, with O’Malley as its head – offered perhaps the boldest response: He wants O’Malley, not Francis, to be pope.

“Deep down I think O’Malley would like to take action, and if he were pope I think we would be seeing a different world,” he said in comments to Crux.

“But first and foremost, he is an obedient servant – to his boss the pope, not to those he serves,” Saunders said.

In an email sent to several parties on Sunday, Saunders emphasized how disappointed he is in the pope.

“Pope Francis’s attack on the victims of Karadima has lost him more friends than he can begin to imagine,” Saunders wrote, referring to the name of a Chile’s most notorious pedophile priest. “He is certainly not the man I thought he was.”

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Child sex abuse inquiry to query whether Gove asked about investigation

LONDON (ENGLAND)
The Guardian

January 21, 2018

By Owen Bowcott

Environment secretary’s alleged interest in inquiry into priest suspected of abuse surfaced last month

The child sex abuse inquiry is to write to Michael Gove to ask whether he attempted to find out about the release of an investigation into a priest suspected of abuse at a prominent Catholic boarding school.

The alleged interest of the former secretary of state for education in a police and local authority inquiry into the priest surfaced during evidence given to the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) last month.

Gove, now the environment secretary, denies making any phone calls to the local authority in relation to the investigation. A search of education department telephone records, his office has said, can find no trace of any such contacts.

In a statement to the Guardian, IICSA said: “The Roman Catholic Church hearings are ongoing and there are a number of matters that require further investigation, including the evidence heard on 13 December 2017 in relation to the former secretary of state for education. The inquiry will be making requests for further information on this issue.”

The priest, only identified by the reference number F65, is alleged to have had “connections to some quite senior figures”. In evidence given to the inquiry on 13 December, F65 was said to have been the subject of an allegation of oral sex with a 16-year-old boy.

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The Latest: Police: 1.2M turn out for Pope’s last Peru Mass

BOSTON (MA)
Associated Press via Boston Herald

January 21, 2018

Photo caption: A protest banner that shows images of Pope Francis and Cardinal Sean O’Malley with a message that reads in Spanish: “Francisco, here we do have proof”, hangs from a building located outside the Shrine of Our Lord of the Miracles where Francis led a mid-morning prayer, in Lima, Peru, Sunday, Jan. 21, 2018. Francis stirred outrage when he accused victims of Chile’s most notorious pedophile priest of slander when he departed Chile on Thursday. O’Malley, Francis’ top adviser on clerical sex abuse, implicitly rebuked the pontiff for having accused Chilean victims of slander, saying that his words were “a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse.” (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

9:45 a.m.

The controversy over Pope Francis’ accusations of slander against victims of Chile’s most notorious pedophile priest has followed him to Peru.

A banner hanging from a building near the Lima church where Francis prayed on Sunday read “Francis, here there is proof” and featured a photo of the disgraced founder of a Peru-based Catholic lay movement, Sodalitium Christianae Vitae.

The Vatican last week took over the movement after Peruvian prosecutors announced they wanted to arrest the founder, Luis Figari. An independent investigation found Figari sodomized recruits and forced them to fondle him and one another, liked to watch them “experience pain, discomfort and fear,” and humiliated them in front of others.

In Chile, Francis accused victims of the country’s most notorious sexual abuser, the Rev. Fernando Karadima, of slandering another bishop by saying he knew of Karadima’s abuse but did nothing. Francis said there was “not one shred of proof” implicating the bishop and that the accusations against him were “calumny.”

The comments caused such an outcry that Francis’ top sexual abuse adviser issued a highly unusual public rebuke of the pope.

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Pope Wraps Latin America Trip Haunted by Chile Abuse Scandal

LIMA (PERU)
Associated Press via NBC-TV Dallas-Fort Worth

January 21, 2018

By Nicole Winfield and Christine Armario

During his seven-day trip in Chile and Peru Francis personally apologized to survivors of priests who sexually abused them

Pope Francis wrapped up his visit to Peru on Sunday by meeting with bishops and nuns, but controversy over his accusations that Chilean sex abuse victims slandered a bishop cast a shadow over what has become the most contested and violent trip of his papacy.

A day after his top adviser on sex abuse publicly rebuked him for his Chile remarks, Francis was reminded that the Vatican has faced years of criticism for its inaction over a similar sex abuse scandal in neighboring Peru.

“Francis, here there IS proof,” read a banner hanging from a Lima building along his motorcade route Sunday.

The message was a reference to Francis’ Jan. 18 comments in Iquique, Chile, that there was not “one shred of proof” that a protege of Chile’s most notorious pedophile priest, the Rev. Fernando Karadima, knew of Karadima’s abuse and did nothing to stop it. Karadima’s victims have accused the bishop, Juan Barros, of complicity in the cover-up. Barros has denied the accusations, and Francis backed him by saying the victims’ claims were “all calumny.”

His comments sparked such an outcry that both the Chilean government and his own top adviser on abuse stepped in to publicly rebuke him — an extraordinary correction of a pope from both church and state. The criticisms were all the more remarkable because they came on the Argentina-born pontiff’s home turf in Latin America.

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Activistas en Perú piden cárcel para curas que cometen abusos sexuales

LIMA (PERU)
Publimetro

>>>Activists in Peru ask for jail for priests who commit sexual abuse

January 18, 2018

“La Iglesia Católica está muy implicada en la violación de menores, en encubrir esos actos y lo único que hace cuando hay denuncias es cambiar al culpable de zona”, dijo el británico Peter Saunders.

Activistas de varios países dijeron este miércoles en Perú, en la víspera de la llegada del Papa Francisco, que no basta con pedir perdón a las víctimas de abusos sexuales cometidos por sacerdotes, sino que los responsables deben ir a prisión.

“No basta que el Papa Francisco pida perdón por los abusos a los niños cometidos por los padres pederastas, sino a decir la verdad, para contribuir a hacer justicia, que los culpables vayan a la cárcel”, dijo el exsacerdote mexicano Alberto Athié, quien descubrió uno de los primeros casos de abuso del fundador de los Legionarios de Cristo, Marcial Maciel.

“Esperamos que el abusador sea sancionado, ahora que el Vaticano ha intervenido en el caso”, declaró la estadounidense Anne Barret-Doyle, quien afirmó que ha habido encubrimiento en los casos de abusos sexuales perpetrados por líderes del grupo laico católico peruano Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana, intervenido por la Santa Sede hace una semana.

[Google Translation: “The Catholic Church is very involved in the rape of minors, in covering up those acts and the only thing it does when there are complaints is to change the area’s guilty party,” said Briton Peter Saunders.

Activists from several countries said Wednesday in Peru, on the eve of the arrival of Pope Francis , that it is not enough to apologize to victims of sexual abuse committed by priests, but that those responsible should go to prison.

“It is not enough for Pope Francis to apologize for the abuse of children committed by pedophile parents, but to tell the truth, to contribute to justice, that the guilty go to jail,” said former Mexican priest Alberto Athié, who discovered one of the first cases of abuse of the founder of the Legionaries of Christ, Marcial Maciel.

“We hope that the abuser will be punished, now that the Vatican has intervened in the case,” said the American Anne Barret-Doyle, who affirmed that there has been a cover-up in the cases of sexual abuse perpetrated by leaders of the Peruvian Catholic lay group Sodalicio de Vida. Christian, intervened by the Holy See a week ago.

The activists, who led a crusade similar to Chile, the first stop of the papal tour, lamented in a press conference that Pope Francis asked for forgiveness of the victims of pedophilia and then participated in a mass concelebrated by the Chilean bishop Juan Barros, accused to cover up the sexual abuse of priests.

“The Catholic Church is very involved in the rape of minors, in covering up those acts and the only thing it does when there are complaints is to change the guilty party,” said Briton Peter Saunders, who was a member of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors.

In the meeting with the press there was also the American lawyer Tim Law, specialized in the subject; his compatriot Denise Buchanan, author of the book Sins of the Fathers; the German Matthias Katsch, who runs an association of victims of child abuse; and the Ecuadorian Sara Oviedo.

The Ecuadorian activist said that a few months ago they sent a document to the pope asking him to separate the religious who have abused children, but “so far” have not received a response.

“That worries us all,” said Oviedo.

A week ago, the Vatican intervened the Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana , founded in Peru in 1971 and extended to other countries, in the midst of a scandal over accusations of sexual abuse against four of its leaders, including its founder, the Peruvian layman Luis Fernando Figari, 70 years old.

In December, the Peruvian prosecutor’s office requested preventive detention for Figari, a refugee in Rome under the protection of the Vatican, and the other three leaders.

The Pope Francisco will serve a three – day visit to Peru.]

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Piden al papa Francisco investigar a clérigos acusados en Perú

LIMA (PERU)
Diario Correa

>>>Pope Francis is asked to investigate accused clerics in Peru

January 18, 2018

Además, que la iglesia debería encontrar mecanismos que permitan denunciar estos delitos

Activistas y víctimas de abusos sexuales afirmaron hoy en Lima que el papa Francisco debe “remitir a la justicia común, para que sean sancionados como corresponde”, a los clérigos católicos denunciados por casos de este tipo.

“La Iglesia no puede ser responsable por personas que, en cualquier tipo de circunstancias, son unos abusadores”, afirmó la ecuatoriana Sara Oviedo, exvicepresidenta del Comité de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas (ONU).

Oviedo participó en una exposición ante la prensa realizada por integrantes del grupo TAP o The Accountability Proyect (Proyecto de rendición de cuentas), un día antes del inicio de una visita oficial y apostólica del papa Francisco a Perú.

[Google Translation: In addition, that the church should find mechanisms to report these crimes

Activists and victims of sexual abuse said today in Lima that Pope Francis must “refer to common justice, to be punished as appropriate,” to Catholic clerics reported by cases of this type.

“The Church can not be responsible for people who, in any type of circumstances, are abusers,” said Ecuadorian Sara Oviedo , former vice president of the United Nations Human Rights Committee ( UN ).

Oviedo participated in an exhibition before the press made by members of the TAP group or The Accountability Project , a day before the beginning of an official and apostolic visit of Pope Francis to Peru .

In the presentation were the Mexican Alberto Athié , the British Peter Saunders , the German Matthias Katsch and the North Americans Tim Law , Denisse Buchanan and Anne Barrett Doyle .

The ex- UN official said that the victims of abuse also ask to “separate from their positions clerics who are known, or suspect, to have committed some type of abuse.”

He also considered that the canon law should be modified so that these cases can no longer be considered “only as a moral violation” and that the church should find mechanisms to denounce these crimes, as well as address them in the formation of priests and education of children in reporting mechanisms.

Athié, a former priest who discovered one of the first cases of abuse perpetrated in Mexico by the founder of the Legionaries of Christ, Marcial Maciel , said that the victims’ denunciations “have met with a wall” in the Catholic Church.

“You have to confront the sayings, the facts and the gestures,” he said before emphasizing that “forgiveness is not enough, that is a very important value, but first there is the truth.”

Saunders, who joined the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors until December , reported that he was abused by two Jesuit priests 50 years ago and has not yet “been able to overcome that”, although now he no longer feels “any resentment”.

“It is not a matter of simply accusing the church, it is a matter of humanity that must be attacked,” said the founder of the National Association for Children Abused in Children ( NAPAC ) in the United Kingdom.

Matthias Katsch , co-founder of an association of victims of child abuse, said he participates in these activities “as a survivor”, since he was abused in a Jesuit school.

“We have the opportunity to show people that they have been victims in the past that we have opportunities today,” he said before emphasizing that the Catholic Church has a “responsibility” as a “global institution that trains children.”

Denisse Buchanan , author of “Sins of the Fathers” , said she was raped at 17 by a priest in Jamaica, who became pregnant and then miscarried, so he emphasized that “the clerical abuse has to stop”, and that leaves “a scar for a lifetime”.

Barret Doyle added, meanwhile, that in Peru they have to deepen investigations of cases such as those of the Catholic organization Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana, which came to light after the publication in 2015 of the book “Mitad monjes, mitad soldados” , of the Peruvian journalists Pedro Salinas and Paola Ugaz .

He considered that, in addition to the intervention of Sodalicio announced by the Pope last week, he could ask that the founder of that group, Luis Figari, who is currently staying in Rome, be extradited to Peru.

The activist remarked that the denunciations about the Legionaries of Christ, in Mexico; Karadima, in Chile, or Sodalicio , in Peru, “these are cases of victims with economic means” .

“We have not yet heard of cases of poor victims, and the poor are especially vulnerable,” he concluded.]

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Cardinal O’Malley: Pope caused ‘great pain’ for abuse survivors in Chile

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter

January 20, 2018

By Josh McElwee

Trujillo, Peru – Boston Cardinal Sean O’Malley, one of Pope Francis’ key advisors on clergy sexual abuse, acknowledged Jan. 20 that the pontiff’s defense of a Chilean bishop accused of covering up abuse was “a source of great pain” for survivors.

In an unusually blunt statement from a church prelate in response to a controversial action of a pope, the cardinal also said that expressions of doubt about survivors’ testimony “abandon those who have suffered reprehensible criminal violations of their human dignity.”

O’Malley is responding to Francis’ defense of Osorno, Chile Bishop Juan Barros Madrid, who is accused of not reporting abuse perpetrated by a fellow priest in the 1980s and ’90s.

Questioned Jan. 18 by reporters about Barros during a visit to Chile, the pontiff called the charges “calumny” and said: “There is not one piece of evidence against him.”

Francis’ words enraged the abuse survivor community and many Chilean Catholics, as three survivors have testified that Barros witnessed Fr. Fernando Karadima abusing them. Abuse tracking website BishopAccountability.org said the pope had “turned back the clock to the darkest days of this crisis.”

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O’Malley: ‘Great pain’ from pope’s abuse comments ‘understandable’

DENVER (CO)
Crux

January 20, 2018

In a remarkably candid statement from the man named in 2014 to head Pope Francis’s own Vatican commission dedicated to fighting clerical sexual abuse, Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston on Saturday said it’s “understandable” that the pontiff’s language on the crisis the day before had caused “great pain.”

Those comments, O’Malley said, may create the impression that the pope would “abandon those who have suffered reprehensible criminal violations of their human dignity, and relegate survivors to discredited exile.”

In general, it’s unusual for a cardinal to distance himself from a papal statement in such a fashion, especially someone perceived as being close to Francis such as O’Malley.

At the same time, O’Malley, President of the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors and also a member of the pope’s “C9” council of cardinal advisers from around the world, affirmed Francis’s sincerity in coming to grips with the abuse scandals.

“Pope Francis fully recognizes the egregious failures of the Church and its clergy who abused children, and the devastating impact those crimes have had on survivors and their loved ones,” he said.

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Papal adviser Cardinal Sean O’Malley rebukes Pope Francis for abuse comments

BONN (GERMANY)
Deutsche Welle

January 21, 2018

Pope Francis said during his trip to Chile that allegations a bishop there had known about sexual abuse were “slander.” Boston’s archbishop says those words were “a great source of pain for survivors of sexual abuse.”

The Roman Catholic Church’s chief adviser on clerical sexual abuse broke ranks with Pope Francis on Saturday after the pontiff accused Chilean abuse victims of slander.

In a rare public rebuke, Cardinal Sean O’Malley of Boston said Pope Francis’s comments during a visit to Chile were “a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse by clergy or any other perpetrator.”

O’Malley, appearing to engage in damage control after strong reactions in Chile, said Pope Francis “fully recognizes the egregious failures of the church and its clergy who abused children and the devastating impact those crimes have had on survivors and their loved ones.”

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‘Calumny,’ yes, but the right object?

WORCESTER (MA)
Worcester Telegram & Gazette

January 20, 2018

I had to look up the word “calumny” while reading about Pope Francis’ disastrous trip to Chile, where he angered victims of clergy sexual abuse by defending a bishop accused of covering up the crimes of a fellow priest.

“There is not one shred of proof against him,” the pope told a reporter who asked about Bishop Juan Barros last week. “It’s all calumny. Is that clear?”

Crystal, Your Eminence. For the record, the word “calumny” means “the making of false and defamatory statements in order to damage someone’s reputation; slander.” According to the Oxford English Dictionary, synonyms include “character assassination” and “evil-speaking.”

Calumny. Let that word sink it. That’s how the pope described the credible claims of victims who insist that Juan Barros did nothing to stop the Rev. Fernando Karadima from abusing dozens of minors over a decades-long period starting in the 1980s. Karadima is a notorious disgraced priest who served in the Chilean city of Osorno until he was dismissed in 2011.

His victims say Barros, Karadima’s protégé, knew about the priest’s abuse, with one man even claiming that Barros was present when Karadima groped him and another boy. Yet Barros remained silent and never reported it.

With what we know about the clergy sex scandal, is that really so hard to believe? Even here in Worcester, and in Boston and elsewhere, there was a clear pattern that bishops and clergy were aware that children were being abused by priests, yet they did nothing. But even now, rather than speak for the victims of abuse whom the pope has long purported to defend, he instead accused them of slander.

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Scandals Swirl Around Pope Francis: Sex Abuse, Child Porn, Cocaine and Corruption

UNITED STATES
Open Tabernacle

January 19, 2018

By Betty Clermont

In just the latter half of 2017, over a dozen scandals – with hints of more to come – drew close to the pope but were mostly ignored by the U.S. media.

July 3 – Archbishop Luis Ladaria Ferrer accused of sex abuse cover-up.

Pope Francis appointed Ladaria as prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the Vatican department that addresses cases of clergy sexual abuse, on June 30. Ladaria had previously served as secretary, the second highest official.

Three days later, Ladaria was accused of covering up for Fr. Gianni Trotta. “The congregation received complaints against Trotta in 2009 and three years later found him guilty of sexually abusing minors, demoting him from the priesthood but failing to inform the Italian authorities …. Ladaria wrote to the bishop of Foggia in 2012 instructing him not to divulge the reasons why Trotta had been stripped of his priesthood “so as to avoid scandal.”

Trotta continued to dress as a priest and became the coach of a youth soccer team.

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Cardinal O’Malley: Pope’s words ‘a source of great pain’ for abuse survivors

BOSTON (MA)
Catholic News Agency

January 20, 2018

The chairman of the Vatican’s commission on sexual abuse has said that recent comments from Pope Francis were painful and alienating to survivors of clerical sexual abuse.

“It is understandable that Pope Francis’ statements yesterday in Santiago, Chile were a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse by clergy or any other perpetrator,” said Cardinal Sean O’Malley, Archbishop of Boston, in a Jan. 20 statement.

The statement refers to a comment made by Pope Francis to a Chilean reporter Jan. 18. The Pope was asked about Bishop Juan Barros, a Chilean accused by four victims of clerical sexual abuse of colluding with their abuser to cover up his crimes. Barros, who has maintained his innocence, has been a subject of controversy since his 2015 appointment to lead the Diocese of Osorno.

“The day they bring me proof against Bishop Barros, I’ll speak,” Pope Francis told the reporter. “There is not one shred of proof against him. It’s all calumny. Is that clear?”

O’Malley said that “not having been personally involved in the cases that were the subject of yesterday’s interview I cannot address why the Holy Father chose the particular words he used at that time.”

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Statement by Cardinal O’Malley

BOSTON (MA)
Boston Globe

January 20, 2018

Statement by Cardinal Sean O’Malley

Cardinal O’Malley in Boston released a statement in response to comments by Pope Francis in Chile.

It is understandable that Pope Francis’ statements yesterday in Santiago, Chile were a source of great pain for survivors of sexual abuse by clergy or any other perpetrator. Words that convey the message “if you cannot prove your claims then you will not be believed” abandon those who have suffered reprehensible criminal violations of their human dignity and relegate survivors to discredited exile.

Not having been personally involved in the cases that were the subject of yesterday’s interview I cannot address why the Holy Father chose the particular words he used at that time. What I do know, however, is that Pope Francis fully recognizes the egregious failures of the Church and it’s clergy who abused children and the devastating impact those crimes have had on survivors and their loved ones.

Accompanying the Holy Father at numerous meetings with survivors I have witnessed his pain of knowing the depth and breadth of the wounds inflicted on those who were abused and that the process of recovery can take a lifetime. The Pope’s statements that there is no place in the life of the Church for those who would abuse children and that we must adhere to zero tolerance for these crimes are genuine and they are his commitment.

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January 20, 2018

Paedophile ex-priest ‘sorry’ for abusing four boys

EDINBURGH (SCOTLAND)
The Scotsman

January 20, 2018

By Chris Marshall

A former priest convicted of sexually abusing boys in his care has expressed regret for his “abhorrent” crimes.

Bernard Traynor, 64, was convicted of six charges of indecent assault in 1995 for abuse carried out against four boys in the 1970s while he was a trainee priest helping out at a children’s home in Newcastle.

The Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry heard that the care of the children had been arranged in Scotland.

Traynor said it had been “totally wrong” that he had been allowed to be a house parent at the St Vincent’s home without training or proper supervision.

Asked about the abuse, Traynor said: “Its abhorrent to me now that I could do that. I don’t in any way feel proud for what I’ve done.”

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Pope’s Defense of Chilean Bishop in Sex Abuse Scandal Causes Outrage

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Times

January 19, 2018

By Pascale Bonnefoy and Austin Ramzy

Leer en español: El papa llama ‘calumnia’ a las críticas de que un obispo encubre abusos

Iago, Chile – A number of Chilean Catholics reacted with disappointment and anger on Friday, a day after Pope Francis spoke in defense of a bishop who they say protected a pedophile priest. The remarks, made on Thursday just before Francis left Chile for Peru, upended his efforts to rehabilitate the Catholic Church’s reputation while visiting South America.

Francis told reporters Thursday there was not a shred of evidence against Bishop Juan Barros Madrid, who victims of the Rev. Fernando Karadima, Chile’s most notorious priest, have accused of being complicit in his crimes.

“The day someone brings me proof against Bishop Barros, then I will talk,” Francis said before celebrating Mass outside the northern Chilean city of Iquique. “But there is not one single piece of evidence. It is all slander. Is that clear?”

The pope’s comments set off a storm in Chile, raising questions about his commitment to repairing the damage from sexual abuse scandals and improving the decline in the church’s image and following in the traditionally devout country.

Benito Baranda, coordinator of the pope’s visit to Chile, told a radio station in Santiago that Bishop Barros “should have ceased to be bishop a long time ago.” He added: “The damage he is inflicting on the church is big.”

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Clergy Abuse Advocates Fear Pope Francis Is Making It Harder for Victims to Speak Up

NEW YORK (NY)
Huffington Post

January 19, 2018

By Carol Kuruvilla

When Joelle Casteix heard Pope Francis accuse sex abuse victims in Chile of slander, the pontiff’s words hit close to home.

Francis told reporters Thursday that he hasn’t seen any convincing evidence against Chile’s Bishop Juan Barros Madrid, whom victims claim protected a pedophile priest.

“The day someone brings me proof against Bishop Barros, then I will talk,” Francis said during a papal trip to Chile, according to The New York Times. “But there is not one single piece of evidence. It is all slander. Is that clear?”

Casteix, a California native and advocate for abuse victims, knows what it’s like to share a vulnerable story of sexual abuse and to have that story questioned. She is herself a survivor of abuse within the Roman Catholic Church. From 1986 to 1988, she was abused by a choir director at Santa Ana’s Mater Dei High School, in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange. By the time the abuse ended, she said, the teacher had left her pregnant and with a sexually transmitted disease. She was only 17.

It wasn’t until 2005 that Casteix and other survivors in her area finally had access to documents the diocese had kept about sexual abusers in its midst. The documents, obtained as part of a $100 million settlement between the diocese and 90 alleged abuse victims, showed how officials had protected priests and teachers who molested children.

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Sexual abuse allegations against former local priest confirmed

EXCELSIOR SPRINGS (MO)
Excelsior Springs Standard

January 19, 2018

A December notice from The Catholic Key, a newspaper published by the Diocese of Kansas City—St. Joseph, announced that sexual abuse allegations against Father Sylvester James Hoppe have been confirmed by the Diocese.

According to the Diocese, this allegation marks the seventh confirmed claim against Hoppe by the Roman Catholic Church, and two additional lawsuits claiming childhood sexual abuse against Hoppe were settled by the Diocese in 2008. The most recent claim dates to abuse that occurred from 1953-1956.

Hoppe was ordained in 1946 at the age of 35 and he retired in June 1991 after serving in numerous communities across the Kansas City—St. Joseph Diocese. Diocesan records note Hoppe was a priest at St. Ann’s Catholic Church in Excelsior Springs from 1971-1982.

To date, all substantiated allegations against Hoppe date back to the 1950s, when he was Chaplain at St. Mary’s Orphanage and State Hospital in St. Joseph, Mo. From 1951-1958, Hoppe lived on campus at the orphanage, which housed boys girls and boys. Hoppe also worked closely with the Boy Scouts of America throughout his entire career with the Church.

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One After Another, Athletes Face Larry Nassar and Recount Sexual Abuse

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Times

January 19, 2018

By Scott Cacciola and Christine Hauser

[With video. In the print edition, the headline reads: ‘Powerful Army of Survivors’ Confronts Abuser.

Lansing – Armed with pieces of paper etched with their memories of sexual abuse, they stepped forward, one by one — nearly 100 of them, with more to come.

For four full days this week, in a fluorescent-lighted courtroom here, women and girls — some of them the best gymnasts in the country, others with dreams prematurely crushed, they said, by a man who now sat in handcuffs 10 feet away — leaned into a microphone to address him, sometimes through sobs, sometimes with screams, but always with determination.

Aly Raisman, 23, who won gold medals at the past two Summer Olympics, told of late-night knocks on her hotel door while she was competing overseas, as the man, Dr. Lawrence G. Nassar, then the team doctor, arrived to abuse her.

A teammate at the 2012 London Games, Jordyn Wieber, who until Friday had not identified herself as a victim of Dr. Nassar’s, recalled the torment of the Games, where she was a part of the American team that won a gold medal but, she said, had to submit to his care under the auspices of the sport’s governing body, U.S.A. Gymnastics.

“Our bodies were all hanging by a thread in London,” she said. “Who was the doctor that U.S.A.G. sent? The doctor who was our abuser.”

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Church conservatives question pope’s airborne nuptials

LIMA (PERU)
Associated Press via Washington Post

January 20, 2018

By Nicole Winfield

The honeymoon, as it were, is apparently over.

A day after Pope Francis grabbed headlines by pronouncing two flight attendants man and wife while flying 36,000 feet over Chile, the conservative Catholic commentariat on Friday questioned the legitimacy of the impromptu sacrament and warned it could cheapen the church’s marriage preparation down the line.

“Do you know what’s a ‘marriage’ ripe for annulment?” tweeted the traditionalist blog Rorate Caeli. “One celebrated apparently on a whim in an airplane whose celebrant cannot even be sure if parties are validly baptized.”

For those who missed the news, Francis on Thursday presided over what the Vatican said was the doctrinally and canonically legitimate wedding of Paula Podest and Carlos Ciuffardi, two flight attendants from LATAM flight 1250 that brought the pope, his delegation and travelling press from Santiago to the northern city of Iquique.

* * *

The surreal scene had the effect — at least temporarily — of giving Francis a bit of a reprieve after his visit to Chile was dominated by a church sex abuse scandal.

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Vermont Group Part of Connecticut Priest Abuse Settlement

BURLINGTON (VT)
Associated Press via U.S. News and World Report

January 19, 2018

A Vermont-based religious order is among several Roman Catholic groups that agreed to a $900,000 settlement in an alleged priest sex-abuse case in Connecticut dating to the late 1970s and early 1980s.

The Burlington Free Press reports the Society of St. Edmund and several Roman Catholic entities in Connecticut recently agreed to split the settlement paid to 50-year-old Andrew Aspinwall, of New London.

Aspinwall, who agreed to be identified publicly, alleged he was abused by now-defrocked priest Charles Many, a Vermont native and member of the society, while he was serving as an altar boy at Sacred Heart Church in Groton.

The settlement, reached last month ahead of a trial scheduled for this month, contained no admission of wrongdoing. Aspinwall’s attorney, Kelly Reardon, says Many vehemently denied any impropriety. The case was withdrawn Wednesday.

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Ex-priest, diocese sued over alleged abuse

BENNINGTON (VT)
Bennington Banner

January 19, 2018

By Jim Therrien

A former priest with a history of sexually abusing boys and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany, N.Y., are being sued over alleged abuse of an unnamed victim during incidents in Bennington County.

The suit was filed this week in Bennington Superior Court Civil Division by attorney Christopher Flint, of Cooper Erving & Savage, of Albany, on behalf of a victim referred to as John Doe. It seeks damages for the alleged long-term effects of incidents occurring an unspecified number of years ago when the plaintiff was a boy.

The former priest, Mark Haight, was one of several in the Albany Diocese involved in complaints of sexual abuse of minors, over which confidential settlement payments were made to victims by the diocese over a 25-year period, according to a New York Times report in 2002. At the time, the diocese had recently acknowledged that a number of settlements had been concluded.

Haight was involved in at least two settlement agreements involving complaints of sexual abuse of a minor. One settlement amount that was later made public involved a payment of $997,500, given in 1997 to an unnamed man who said he was abused by Haight over several years, beginning at age 12.

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Pope Francis Accuses Bishop’s Critics of Slander, Riling Sex Abuse Victims In Chile

WASHINGTON (DC)
NPR

January 19, 2018

By Bill Chappell

Pope Francis has accused victims of sexual abuse in Chile of slander, saying their attacks on a bishop who’s accused of covering up the abuse amount to “calumny.” The remarks triggered anger and demonstrations in Chile, where several churches have been firebombed in the past week.

On the last day of his visit to Chile, Francis set the simmering resentment some hold against the Catholic Church to a full boil with his defense of Bishop Juan Barros. The bishop has been hotly criticized ever since the pope appointed him in 2015. Barros was the protégé of Rev. Fernando Karadima, a notorious disgraced priest who served in the southern city of Osorno and who was found guilty and dismissed in 2011 for abusing dozens of minors over a decades-long period beginning in the 1980s.

Karadima became the face of the church’s sexual abuse scandal in Chile. And his victims say they believe Barros knew about the priest’s abuse but did nothing to stop it or report it. As recently as this week, Barros has denied witnessing any abuse.

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The pope asks for forgiveness on sex abuse. But he refuses to act.

WASHINGTON (DC)
Washington Post

By Editorial Board

On a recent trip to Chile, Pope Francis apologized, once again, for clerical sex abuse, expressing the “pain and shame, shame I feel over the irreparable harm caused to children by church ministers.” He then proceeded to compound that shame by dismissing credible accusations that a Chilean bishop was complicit in hiding abuse committed by a priest who was once his mentor.

The episode was emblematic of the pope’s apparent inability to come to terms with revelations about pedophile priests and the bishops and cardinals who cover for them. “Is it fair to ask for forgiveness?” he wondered, on arriving in Chile.

Well, no, it’s not fair — not when the church has failed to fully uproot the moral rot that the abuse scandal has planted at its core.

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Pope Francis, company man

BOSTON (MA)
Boston Globe

[Title in the printed edition: Now we know which side Francis is really on.]

January 20, 2018

By Kevin Cullen

Let the record show that the promise of Pope Francis died in Santiago, Chile, on Jan. 18, in the year of our Lord 2018.

When Pope Francis slandered victims of sexual abuse, ironically by accusing those very victims of slandering a Chilean bishop who was complicit in that abuse, he confirmed what some critics have said all along, what I have always resisted embracing: Pope Francis is a company man, no better than his predecessors when it comes to siding with the institutional Roman Catholic Church against any who would criticize it or those, even children, who have been victimized by it.

I offer my hearty congratulations to His Holiness, His Eminence, or whatever self-regarding, officious title that his legion of coat holders, admirers, apologists, and enablers insist we, the great unwashed, call him. Because he has revealed himself like no one else could.

By saying he needs to see proof that Bishop Juan Barros was complicit in covering up the abuse perpetrated by the Rev. Fernando Karadima, Francis has shown himself to be the Vatican’s newest Doubting Thomas. And it’s not a good look.

The pope’s outrageous slander of Karadima’s victims is all the more stunning and disgraceful because the Vatican itself had in 2011 accepted the truth of what those victims said and sentenced Karadima to what it called a lifetime of “penance and prayer” for abusing young people. Sounds like how a previous pope “punished” Cardinal Bernard Law for his dutiful coverup of sexual abuse in the Archdiocese of Boston by putting him in charge of one of the great basilicas of Rome and giving him digs in a palatial apartment where he was waited on hand and foot by servile nuns. Some punishment. Where do I sign up?

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The Pope Causes More Pain for Priests’ Victims

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Times

January 20, 2018

By The Editorial Board

[Note: The editorial incorrectly states that Barros was made a bishop by Pope Francis. Barros was appointed auxiliary bishop of the Diocese of Valparaiso in 1995; bishop of the Diocese of Iquique in 2000; and bishop of the Military Ordinariate of Chile in 2004. All of those actions were taken by Pope John Paul II. See Catholic Hierarchy on Barros. Pope Francis appointed Barros bishop of the Diocese of Osorno in 2015, after his now-famous letter to the Chilean bishops conference went awry.]

Pope Francis arrived in Chile with the right message: He was “pained and ashamed,” he said on Tuesday, about the irreparable damage abusive priests have inflicted on minors. Yet he refused to meet with victims of the country’s most nefarious sexual abuser, and when pressed about his support of a bishop linked to that priest, he dismissed the accusations as slander.

For all his professions of horror at the revelations about predatory priests whose activities were covered up by the hierarchy — and for all his other admirably enlightened and pastoral actions — it seems the pope has yet to fully appreciate that the abuse of minors is not simply a matter of a few deviant priests protected by overzealous prelates but of his church’s acceptance of a horrible violation of a most sacred trust: that of a devout and questioning youth and a spiritual guide.

Acknowledging and regretting the damage is not enough. If the Catholic Church is ever to lift the deep stain of child sex abuse, the pope must take every opportunity to reject not only clear violations but also the slightest appearance of tolerance for such behavior.

He missed that opportunity by attending the funeral last month for Cardinal Bernard Law, the powerful former archbishop of Boston who resigned after revelations that he protected abusive priests for years and became, in effect, the image of a hierarchy that concealed and thereby enabled sexual abuse. He missed it in the failure of the Vatican so far to appoint a new Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors after the commissioners’ terms expired in December.

And Pope Francis missed it again in Chile. One of Latin America’s most staunchly Catholic countries, Chile had been shaken by revelations about the sexual crimes of Fernando Karadima, once one of Chile’s most respected and influential priests. It took years for the church to act on complaints about him, but a Vatican investigation in 2011 finally found Father Karadima guilty of sexual abuse and restricted him to a life of isolated penitence. A Chilean judge later determined that the allegations against the priest were truthful, but the statute of limitations had expired.

Among those accused of turning a blind eye to Father Karadima’s behavior was a priest and longtime member of Father Karadima’s entourage, Juan Barros Madrid. Yet Pope Francis made him a bishop in 2015 and, despite protests from victims of Father Karadima and from many priests and laypeople in the diocese, Bishop Barros participated in the pope’s official ceremonies in Chile. When reporters raised the subject on Thursday, Pope Francis answered sharply that there was “not one single piece of evidence” against the bishop. “It is all slander,” he declared. “Is that clear?”

No, it is not clear.

Victims of sexual abuse may have only their tortured memories as evidence, and these have been dismissed for far too long as slander by a hierarchy intent on protecting the church’s reputation. Pope Francis has repeatedly pledged action to end the abuse and the cover-up, and the church has come a long way. But too often he and his church raise doubts that they’re fully committed.

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January 19, 2018

Pope Francis shocks Chile by accusing sex abuse victims of slander

McLEAN (VA)
USA Today

January 18, 2018

By Jane Onyanga-Omara

Pope Francis has accused victims of a pedophile priest of slandering a bishop by accusing him of a cover-up of the priest’s actions.

The pope’s remarks in Chile Thursday marked a shocking end to a trip aimed at healing historic wounds from sexual abuse by priests in the country.

Francis said that until he sees proof that Bishop Juan Barros was complicit in covering up the sex crimes of the Rev. Fernando Karadima, such accusations against Barros were defamatory.

“The day they bring me proof against Bishop Barros, I’ll speak,” Francis said after a Chilean journalist asked him about Barros. “There is not one shred of proof against him. It’s all calumny. Is that clear?”

The pope’s remarks drew shock from Chileans and immediate rebuke from victims and their supporters. They said the accusers were deemed credible enough by the Vatican that it sentenced Karadima to a lifetime of “penance and prayer” for his crimes in 2011.

A Chilean judge also found the victims to be credible, saying that while she had to drop criminal charges against Karadima because too much time had passed, proof of his crimes wasn’t lacking.

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Pope Francis ‘slander’ comment angers Chile abuse victims

LONDON (ENGLAND)
BBC

January 19, 2018

Pope Francis has triggered anger in Chile after accusing victims of a paedophile priest of slander.

Francis said there was “no proof” for their claims that abuse by Father Fernando Karadima had been covered up by another man, Bishop Juan Barros.

“There is not one single piece of proof against him (Bishop Barros). It is all slander. Is that clear?” the Pope said.

One Karadima victim said the Pope’s earlier plea for forgiveness over clerical sex abuse was “empty”.

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Blame tough lives of priests’ victims on economy, not abuse, says church

SAINT JOHN (NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA)
CBC

January 17, 2018

By Gabrielle Fahmy

Archdiocese says lawsuits over sexual assaults are ‘unreasonable’ and it should not have to pay compensation

The Archdiocese of Moncton continues to deny responsibility for the sexual assaults against children that its priests are accused of having committed decades ago.

In two new documents filed in court, the archdiocese says it should not have to pay compensation, whether the abuse happened or not.

It also says if victims had difficulty making a living, it is because of economic, linguistic and other factors present in New Brunswick at the time, rather than the emotional and psychological trauma they suffered.

The documents are statements of defence in response to civil lawsuits alleging abuse at the hands of former priests Yvon Arsenault and Camille Leger.

Arsenault was sent to prison for four years, after admitting to molesting young boys when he was a priest in Shediac and Collette in the 1970s.

Camille Leger died in 1991 before he was ever accused of any crimes. He was priest at Sainte-Therese-d’Avila parish in Cap Pelé from 1957 to 1980 and is estimated to have abused more than 100 boys.

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Edmundites to pay up in priest sex-abuse lawsuit

BURLINGTON (VT)
Free Press

January 18, 2018

By Adam Silverman

A Colchester-based religious order is among several Roman Catholic institutions that recently settled a priest sex abuse lawsuit in Connecticut for nearly $1 million.

The court case centered on misconduct claims involving defrocked priest Charles Many, a Vermont native and St. Michael’s College graduate who helped lead parishes in Essex Junction and in Groton, Connecticut, and was a member of the Society of St. Edmund.

The society and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Norwich in Connecticut agreed to split the $900,000 settlement paid to Andrew Aspinwall, 50, of New London, said his lawyer, Kelly Reardon. The agreement, which Aspinwall and the defendants reached on the eve of a trial that was set to begin early this month, contained no admission of wrongdoing.

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Pope Accuses Sex Abuse Victims in Chile of Slandering Bishop

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Times

January 19, 2018

By Pascale Bonnefoy and Austin Ramzy

Santiago, Chile – Pope Francis has accused abuse victims in Chile of slandering a bishop who they say protected a pedophile priest, upending his efforts to rehabilitate the Catholic Church’s reputation while visiting South America.

Francis told reporters Thursday there was not a shred of evidence against Bishop Juan Barros Madrid, who victims of the Rev. Fernando Karadima, Chile’s most notorious priest, have accused of being complicit in his crimes.

“The day someone brings me proof against Bishop Barros, then I will talk,” Francis said before celebrating Mass outside the northern Chilean city of Iquique. “But there is not one single piece of evidence. It is all slander. Is that clear?”

The pope’s comments set off a storm in Chile, raising questions about his commitment to repairing the damage from sexual abuse scandals and improving the decline in the church’s image and following in the traditionally devout country.

“Pope Francis’ attack on the Karadima victims is a stunning setback,” said Anne Barrett Doyle, a co-director of BishopAccountability.org, a group that monitors abuse cases. “He has just turned back the clock to the darkest days of this crisis. Who knows how many victims now will decide to stay hidden, for fear they will not be believed?”

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

A Blot on Ireland’s Past, Facing Demolition

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Times

January 15, 2018

Leer en español: Irlanda se pregunta si es mejor borrar el pasado o conmemorarlo

By Ed O’Loughlinjan

[See also Gary Gannon, The Last Laundry, Broadsheet (10/25/17). The literature on the Magdalene Laundries is voluminous. Among the online resources:
Justice for Magdalenes Research
• Irish Human Rights Commission, Assessment of the Human Rights Issues Arising in Relation to the “Magdalen Laundries” (11/2010)
• Maeve O’Rourke, Submission to the United Nations Committee Against Torture, 46th Session, prepared by Justice for Magdalenes (5/2011)
State involvement in the Magdalene Laundries (Justice for Magdalenes’ principal submissions to the Inter-departmental Committee; submitted 9/18/2012; released in this redacted form 2/16/13)
• Senator Martin McAlese et al., Report of the Inter-Departmental Committee to establish the facts of State involvement with the Magdalen Laundries (2/5/2013)
• Taoiseach Enda Kenny, Statement before the Dáil on the McAleese Report (2/19/13; see also the video)
• Justice John Quirke, The Magdalen Commission Report (dated 5/2013; released 6/26/2013)
Restorative Justice Scheme (6/26/2013)
• Irish Human Rights Commission, Submission to the UN Human Rights Committee (6/2014)
• United Nations, Committee Against Torture, Concluding observations on the second periodic report of Ireland (8/10/2017)
• Peter Tyndall, Opportunity Lost, an investigation by the Ombudsman into the administration of the Magdalen Restorative Justice Scheme (11/23/2017)]

The General Post Office in Dublin, center of the 1916 rebellion against British rule, is today a shrine to Irish freedom. Three blocks to the east, on a quiet, run-down side street, stands a monument to a very different side of Irish history — though maybe not for long.

The old Gloucester Street laundry, the last of Ireland’s infamous Magdalene Laundries to shut its doors, will soon be demolished and replaced by a budget hotel and a student residence — if the City Council has its way.

Founded in the 19th century, the Gloucester Street laundry was one of around a dozen such businesses run by Roman Catholic nuns and staffed by unpaid inmates — mostly orphan girls or young women who had become pregnant outside marriage or whose families could not or would not support them — who were given to the nuns to hide them away.

Owned most recently by the Sisters of Our Lady of Charity of Refuge, the Gloucester Street laundry usually had around 100 workers at any one time. It took in its last new inmate — transferred from a psychiatric hospital — as recently as 1995, then closed the following year.

The Magdalene women endured many of the same hardships as the inmates of the brutal church-run “industrial schools” for delinquent or unwanted children, and the “mother and baby homes,” where unmarried pregnant women were warehoused until their children were born (and then often taken for adoption). Poor nutrition and hygiene, cold and damp lodgings and little or no medical supervision were the norm.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Pope shocks Chile by accusing sex abuse victims of slander

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Associated Press via Mercury News

January 18, 2018

By Nicole Winfield

Pope Francis accused victims of Chile’s most notorious pedophile of slander Thursday, an astonishing end to a visit meant to help heal the wounds of a sex abuse scandal that has cost the Catholic Church its credibility in the country.

Francis said that until he sees proof that Bishop Juan Barros was complicit in covering up the sex crimes of the Rev. Fernando Karadimas, such accusations against Barros are “all calumny.”

The pope’s remarks drew shock from Chileans and immediate rebuke from victims and their advocates. They noted the accusers were deemed credible enough by the Vatican that it sentenced Karadima to a lifetime of “penance and prayer” for his crimes in 2011. A Chilean judge also found the victims to be credible, saying that while she had to drop criminal charges against Karadima because too much time had passed, proof of his crimes wasn’t lacking.

“As if I could have taken a selfie or a photo while Karadima abused me and others and Juan Barros stood by watching it all,” tweeted Barros’ most vocal accuser, Juan Carlos Cruz. “These people are truly crazy, and the pontiff talks about atonement to the victims. Nothing has changed, and his plea for forgiveness is empty.”

* * *

Anne Barrett Doyle, of the online database BishopAccountability.org, said it was “sad and wrong” for the pope to discredit the victims since “the burden of proof here rests with the church, not the victims — and especially not with victims whose veracity has already been affirmed.”

“He has just turned back the clock to the darkest days of this crisis,” she said in a statement. “Who knows how many victims now will decide to stay hidden, for fear they will not be believed?”

Indeed, Catholic officials for years accused victims of slandering and attacking the church with their claims. But up until Francis’ words Thursday, many in the church and Vatican had come to reluctantly acknowledge that victims usually told the truth and that the church for decades had wrongly sought to protect its own.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

January 18, 2018

#MODOPAPA: 10 DENUNCIAS DE ABUSOS SEXUALES EN LA IGLESIA CATÓLICA PERUANA QUE NO VERÁS EN OTRO LUGAR

MEXICO CITY (MEXICO)
Útero.Pe [ Lima, Perú ]

January 18, 2018

By Laura Grados

Read original article

Ahora que es verano y que viene Francisco I, en Útero hemos dejado de lado el #modosalchipapa y lo reemplazamos por el #modopapa. Y como en la tele todo el mundo habla de esperanza, felicidad y santidad, nosotros hemos venido a hablar de curas pedófilos encubiertos históricamente por el Vaticano.

Ay, ya empezaron estos anticristo, seguro son gays

Lo que no verás en la tele

Desde Marcial Maciel en México hasta los casos de abusos sistemáticos en el Sodalicio en Perú, desde Fernando Karadima en Chile hasta Spotlight en Estados Unidos y a todo esto se añaden las decenas de miles de niños víctimas de curas pederastas en Australia.

Los abusos sexuales al interior de la iglesia católica son tan comunes como las hostias en las misas, pero los grandes medios en el Perú, la mayor parte del tiempo, van siempre de espaldas a la realidad. No vamos a encontrar en RPP una investigación sobre la pederastia clerical en el Perú, pero sí vamos a escuchar a Cipriani todos los sábados diciendo que las mujeres se ponen como en un escaparate, provocando (ser violadas).

Por esa razón, hemos agrupado los casos peruanos de abuso en iglesias sobre todo después de que el papa Francisco se despida de Chile con un gesto miserable al pedirle pruebas a las víctimas de Karadima que acusan de encubrimiento al obispo de Osorno, Juan Barros.

“El día que me traigan una prueba del obispo Barros, ahí voy hablar”, expresó el Sumo Pontpifice. “No hay una sola prueba en su contra, todo es calumnia”, agregó Francisco.

Así las cosas, el diario El País de España tiene una sección dentro de su web titulada Los abusos sexuales en la iglesiaque agrupa todos los casos reportados de agresiones perpetradas por curitas y laicos consagrados (como Figari). Son un montón de denuncias, denle click al enlace para que comprendan que no son ganas de joder cuando relacionamos abuso con iglesia.

1. El infierno australiano

En este Útero ya hemos contado sobre los abusos de la iglesia en el extranjero (KaradimaMaciel, etc.) pero poco hemos informado sobre las más de cuatro mil (sí, MÁS DE CUATRO MIL) víctimas reportadas en la iglesia católica de Australia entre los años 1950 y 2010.

Según informó la BBC, una comisión investigadora en Australia que se formó en el 2013 para indagar casos de abuso a niños en varias instituciones de ese país, descubrió que el 60% de estos se dieron en la iglesia. Así se portó esa institución religiosa con las víctimas:

«Según Furness, los casos que oyó la Comisión fueron «deprimentemente parecidos».

«Los niños fueron ignorados o peor, castigados. Las acusaciones no fueron investigadas. Los sacerdotes y los religiosos involucrados fueron trasladados. Las parroquias y comunidades que los recibieron no supieron nada de su pasado», afirmó».

En nuestro país todavía no se ha formado una comisión como en Australia. A excepción del Sodalicio, que representa el caso más grande de abuso al interior de una institución religiosa, el Perú aún no se entera de cuántos niños son abusados por sacerdotes y «hermanos». Por eso, hemos recogido retazos de casos que se volvieron mediáticos pero que solo son una pequeña muestra de lo que realmente se esconde entre versículos y rezos.

2. Caso salesiano

En mayo del año pasado, el programa Punto Final presentó una denuncia en contra del sacerdote peruano exmienbro de la CVR José Antúnez de Mayolo por abusar sexualmente de dos niños.

  • El primer caso fue presentado formalmente en el 2015 ante la congregación salesiana, a la cual pertenece Antúnez de Mayolo. La víctima narró de esta manera los abusos que sufrió al interior del colegio salesiano en Magdalena:

«Me sacó la ropa y comenzó a bañarme, pero igual me tocaba para poder bañarme. Pero ya después esto va cambiando porque ya él -en algún momento- empieza a tocarme sin bañarme y hace que yo también lo toque a él. Y al final de todo esto, que va de menos a más, ya no es solo bañarme… es que él me obliga a tener relaciones sexuales».

  • Sin embargo, dos años después la congregación decidió archivar el caso y es por eso que el denunciante, Américo Legue, acudió a los medios.
  • Otra denuncia contra el mismo sacerdote llegó esta vez desde Arequipa. La víctima, quien solo se identificó con el nombre de Luis, denunció al cura por tocamientos en sus partes íntimas. Los hechos ocurrieron también en un colegio salesiano.

3. Salvador Piñeiro y su cura favorito

Una adolescente de 14 años denunció al cura Félix Pariona Huacre de violación sexual y actualmente está luchando para que la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (Corte IDH) vea su caso.

  • La familia de la víctima le informó el hecho a Salvador Piñeiro, obispo de Ayacucho y actual presidente de la Conferencia Episcopal (la misma que debe recibir al papa).
  • Piñeiro se comprometió en ayudar a la víctima, pero luego no le hizo caso y el cura acusado continuó en Huamanga como si nada.
  • Los padres de la adolescente denunciaron ante la fiscalía y solo porque la denunciante no acudió a una pericia psicológica y en vez de eso presentó otra realizada en el hospital dos de Mayo en Lima, el Ministerio Público archivó el caso.
  • Ante el archivo, los familiares planean llevar su caso ante la Corte IDH, mientras Salvador Piñeiro, el cura que recibirá al papa, ha dicho que la denuncia es «una difamación».

4. Abuso sexual en Moyobamba

En un seminario para niños y adolescentes en Moyobamba, el sacerdote Santiago Martínez fue acusado de abusar sexualmente de cuatro seminaristas. Las modalidades: ellos acudían a él por dolencias (era una especie de enfermero) y el padre les bajaba el pantalón para perpetrar el abuso o también los sorprendía mientras dormían.

“Luego de palparme el abdomen, me dijo que me bajara el pantalón y el calzoncillo, procediendo a tocarme el pene por un momento. Al ver esta actitud, le dije que en ese lugar no me dolía”, confesó el menor, citado por La República.

El caso fue destapado por el diario La República y, a pesar del escándalo, la iglesia católica trasladó al sacerdote español a la sede eclesiástica de Moyobamba. La justificación del obispo de esa ciudad, Rafael Escudero López-Brea, quien seguramente estará en Lima para abrazar al papa Francisco, fue que debía permanecer en ese lugar «hasta que el Vaticano decida qué hacer con él». Felizmente al Vaticano se le adelantó la justicia peruana y el Poder Judicial ordenó, en agosto pasado, siete meses de prisión preventiva contra el cura. El caso sigue su curso.

5. Carlos Enrique Peralta

El diario Proceso de México hace una reseña vasta y escalofriante al mismo tiempo del caso de este cura salesiano nacido en Ayacucho que arrastra denuncias desde los año 90 pero que la iglesia se ha tapado los ojos y lo ha trasladado de país en país donde ha dejado decenas de víctimas.

  • En 1991 fue descubierto con un niño en su dormitorio. Fue reportado a Juan Vera, el jefe de los salesianos en ese entonces (que seguro también estará en la llegada del papa Francisco).
  • En 1995 llegaron más denuncias.
  • En 1997 lo mandan a un centro de tratamiento para curas «Domus Marie».
  • Pero un año después fue transferido a la Parroquia de San Bosco en Chicago.
  • En 1999 fue acusado nuevamente, esta vez en Chicago, de abusar sexualmente de cuatro niños.
  • En ningún momento la iglesia dio parte a las autoridades judiciales para que procesen al sacerdote. Hasta el 2014 se sabía que Peralta se encontraba en México. Continúa impune.

6. Caso Luis del carpio

Este cura fue sentenciado en octubre pasado a 10 años de prisión por tocamientos indebidos a una niña de 12 años.

La denuncia contra el religioso provocó que el Vaticano, a través de la Congregación para la Doctrina de la Fe, decretara su separación o «dimisión del estado clerical», en abril de 2016, según comunicado del obispado de Chimbote.

7. Un religioso acusado en Chile viene a Perú

El religioso (no es cura, es como Figari) Abel Pérez Ruiz fue acusado en Chile de perpetrar abusos sexuales contra, al menos, 14 menores de edad entre 1997 y 2008. Siete años después un grupo de víctimas lo denunció ante la justicia de su país y ahí fue cuando saltó el escándalo: el religioso había estado feliz en Perú todo este tiempo. Impune.

Abel Pérez pertenece a la Congregación Hermanos Maristas de Chile, un grupo cristiano que tiene presencia en otros países. Perú es uno de ellos. Eso explica por qué el sacerdote se encuentra en Lima, rodeado de miembros de dicho grupo. Útero.Pe obtuvo algunas imágenes del abusador cuando posaba sonriente en nuestro país. Las fotografías fueron publicadas en junio de este año.

8. Caso Waldir Pérez Salinas
Es el único caso donde se encontró justicia. El sacerdote Waldir Pérez Salinas fue sentenciado a 35 años de cárcel por abusar sexualmente de un niño de 10 años en reiteradas oportunidades.
Se estableció que el condenado aprovechó su condición de sacerdote y capellán del colegio privado San Alfonso de la Congregación de los Padres Redentoristas, en el distrito de Ate, para abusar sexualmente del infante, identificado con la clave 132-2012.
La agresión sexual se produjo en reiteradas oportunidades en las instalaciones del colegio, entre julio de 2010 –cuando el menor tenía 10 años de edad– y abril de 2012.

10. El árbol caído de Cipriani

El ahora exobispo auxiliar de Ayacucho, Gabino Miranda, fue acusado de violación sexual en el 2013. El Vaticano lo expulsó pero Cipriani, al hablar sobre el caso en su habitual programa de RPP «Diálogo de fe», no tuvo mejor idea que olvidar a las víctimas y más bien preocuparse por el victimario y por su derecho a la defensa.

«No hagamos leña del árbol caído. No exageremos cuando queremos maltratar a nadie. (…) No me parece de buen gusto que un obispo retirado haya hecho una denuncia un poco exagerada o dura. El Papa nos habla de misericordia. Tolerancia cero sí, pero misericordia, justicia y derecho a la defensa».

Hace seis días y a cuatro meses de aprobar su creación, el Congreso de la República decidió seleccionar a los integrantes la comisión que investigará los abusos en el Sodalicio y en otras instituciones públicas y privadas. Que los resultados sean tan similares y prolijos como la investigación realizada en Australia solo depende de sus integrantes:

  • Alejandra Aramayo, Percy Alcalá, Guillermo Martorell y Mártires Lizana por el fujimorismo de Keiko; Salvador Heresi, de Peruanos por el Kambio; Marco Arana, del Frente Amplio; y César Villanueva, de Alianza para el Progreso.

El caso Sodalicio es la punta de un iceberg que en algún momento vamos a tener que enfrentar todos los peruanos.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

CNN Prime: Un gesto necesario

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
CNN Chile

>>CNN Prime: A necessary gesture

January 10, 2018

By Mónica Rincón

[Note: Includes video of the editorial.]

No es sólo el marista Abel Pérez hoy, Karadima o el cura Tato ayer. En los últimos 15 años 80 religiosos han sido acusados de delitos sexuales.

Cometidos desde la asimetría que implica siempre el pastor frente al fiel o incluso entre el adulto y el menor.

No es sólo el abuso de confianza cometido al amparo de una sotana sino la política sistemática de parte de la Iglesia Católica tanto en Chile como en el mundo que en el mejor de los casos fue de desidia y en el peor de ocultamiento.

El marista Pérez confesó su culpa y su congregación calló por años, las autoridades eclesiásticas no creyeron a las víctimas Karadima y mucho antes por ejemplo al obispo Cox lo trasladaron a Alemania.

Por eso la visita del Papa sería un excelente momento para que se reuniera con las víctimas y les pidiera perdón a nombre de la institución que encabeza y perdón por actos propios. Como haber llamado tontos a quienes en Osorno alegaban por el obispo Barros o por haber asistido al funeral del cardenal Law acusado de encubrir abusos en Boston.

Sería la señal más potente de un Nunca Más.

[Google Translation: It is not just the Marist Abel Pérez today, Karadima or priest Tato yesterday. In the last 15 years, 80 religious have been accused of sexual crimes.

Committed from the asymmetry that always implies the pastor in front of the faithful or even between the adult and the minor.

It is not only the abuse of trust committed under the cover of a cassock but the systematic policy on the part of the Catholic Church both in Chile and in the world that in the best of cases was negligence and in the worst concealment.

The Marist Perez confessed his guilt and his congregation was silent for years, the ecclesiastical authorities did not believe the Karadima victims and much earlier, for example, Bishop Cox was moved to Germany.

That is why the Pope’s visit would be an excellent moment for him to meet with the victims and ask for their forgiveness on behalf of the institution he heads and forgiveness for his own acts. How to call fools those who in Osorno alleged by Bishop Barros or have attended the funeral of Cardinal Law accused of covering up abuses in Boston.

It would be the most powerful signal of a Never Again.]

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Papa Francisco defiende a Barros: “No hay una sola prueba en contra de él, sólo hay calumnias”

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Cooperativa

>>Pope Francis defends Barros: “There is not a single test against him, there are only slander”

January 18, 2018

– “El día que me traigan una prueba contra el obispo Barros, ahí hablaré”, dijo el pontífice.

– El obispo de Osorno es sindicado como encubridor de los abusos sexuales del cura Fernando Karadima.

El papa Francisco defendió este jueves al cuestionado obispo Juan Barros, sindicado como encubridor de los abusos sexuales de Fernando Karadima, asegurando que no existen pruebas contra el líder de la Diócesis de Osorno

“El día que me traigan una prueba contra el obispo Barros, ahí voy a hablar. No hay una sola prueba en contra. Todo es calumnia, ¿está claro?”, aseguró el pontífice en conversación con varios medios de comunicación.

Se trata de la primera vez durante su visita a Chile que Jorge Bergoglio comenta la situación de Barros, quien ha sido protagonista durante toda la estadía de Francisco en el país y participando en las misas masivas del Parque O’Higgins en Santiago, aeródromo Maquehue en Temuco y Playa Lobito en Iquique pese a las presión periodística y ciudadana.

[Google Translation:
– “The day they bring me a test against Bishop Barros, I’ll talk there,” said the pontiff.

– The Bishop of Osorno is accused of covering up the sexual abuse of priest Fernando Karadima.

Pope Francis defended Thursday the questioned Bishop Juan Barros , accused of covering up the sexual abuse of Fernando Karadima, assuring that there is no evidence against the leader of the Diocese of Osorno

“The day they bring me a test against Bishop Barros, I’ll talk there, there is not one single proof against it, it’s all slander, is that clear? ” The pontiff said in conversation with several media outlets.

This is the first time during his visit to Chile that Jorge Bergoglio comments on the situation of Barros , who has been the protagonist during Francisco’s stay in the country and participating in the massive Masses of Parque O’Higgins in Santiago , Maquehue airfield in Temuco and Lobito Beach in Iquique despite journalistic and citizen pressure.

There are even several priests who have publicly pointed out that the presence of Barros in the papal visit bothers them and even the “violent” , and admit that the controversy “opaque” the strength of Bergoglio’s message.

Top Hard critics of Karadima whistleblowers

The statements of Pope Francis generated the immediate reaction of the complainants of the Karadima case.

Juan Carlos Cruz , through his Twitter account, criticized the Pope asking for evidence: ” As if one could have taken a selfie or photo while Karadima abused me and others with Juan Barros standing next to him watching everything . ”

“These people from above are crazy and the Pope talks about reparation to the victims, we remain the same and his forgiveness remains empty,” he said, recalling the public request for forgiveness made by the Vatican head of state on Tuesday at the Palacio de la currency .

Juan Carlos Cruz Ch.
@jccruzchellew
As if one could have taken a selfie or photo while Karadima abused me and others with Juan Barros standing next to him watching everything. These people from above are crazy and @Pontifex_es talks about repairing victims. We remain the same and his forgiveness remains empty.
https://twitter.com/cnnchile/status/953989489755590657 …

9:08 – 18 ene. 2018 · Las Condes, Chile
487 487 respuestas 3.886 3.886 Retweets 2.923 2.923 me gusta
While José Andrés Murillo said that ” this has already become personal … Francisco, realize that our struggle is against abuse … Benedict, we need you now.”

José Andrés Murillo
@JosAndrsMurillo
This has already become personal … Francisco, realize that our struggle is against abuse … Benedict, we need you now.

9:31 – 18 ene. 2018
37 37 respuestas 217 217 Retweets 331 331 me gusta
In turn, James Hamilton used the social network to share an image of “the bishops and their leader”: Karadima along with Horacio Valenzuela, Juan Barros, Andrés Arteaga and Tomislav Koljatic, the bishops he formed .

James Hamilton
@YverYactuar
The bishops and their leader

Earlier, upon arriving in Iquique, the bishop of Osorno said that the pontiff had expressed “words of encouragement, support and affection . ”

Barros was also publicly defended by Cardinal Francisco Javier Errázuriz Ossa, who said that his situation “is an invented controversy and has no basis”.

It should be remembered that there is a letter from 2015 – but only last week – where Francisco expressed concern about the Osorno issue and revealed a plan to give Barros and other questioned bishops a sabbatical.]

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La Iglesia oculta casos como el del Sodalicio a nivel mundial

LIMA (PERU)
La República

>>The Church hides cases such as the Sodalicio worldwide

January 18, 2018

By Martín Calderón

Testimonios. Un exsacerdote mexicano, un ciudadano alemán abusado por dos jesuitas y otros activistas denuncian el silencio de la Iglesia Católica en denuncias de pederastia.

“Me considero un sobreviviente de los abusos sexuales, no solo una víctima. Fuimos abusados un grupo de niños en la década del 70, y algunos se suicidaron o tuvieron problemas con el alcohol. Yo sobreviví”.

El relato es de Matthias Katsch, abusado sexualmente a los 13 años, según dijo, por dos jesuitas en un colegio católico en Berlín, Alemania.

Este ciudadano alemán se encuentra en el Perú junto a otras víctimas de abusos sexuales por parte de miembros de la Iglesia católica, y activistas por los derechos de los niños y adolescentes.

La historia de Katsh es parecida a la que vivieron las víctimas del Sodalicio en el Perú. Y parecida también a otros casos registrados en la lejana Irlanda o en el país vecino de Chile.

El caso del Sodalicio, explica la activista Anna Barret-Doyle, “es similar a lo que pasa en todo el globo, y la Iglesia lo sabe”.

[Google Translation: Testimonials . A former Mexican priest, a German citizen abused by two Jesuits and other activists denounce t”I consider myself a survivor of sexual abuse, not just a victim. We were abused a group of children in the 70s, and some committed suicide or had problems with alcohol. I survived”.

The story is from Matthias Katsch, sexually abused at age 13, he said, by two Jesuits at a Catholic school in Berlin, Germany.

YOU CAN SEE The secrets of Sodalicio: What happened inside its walls?

This German citizen is in Peru with other victims of sexual abuse by members of the Catholic Church, and activists for the rights of children and adolescents.

The history of Katsh is similar to that of the victims of Sodalicio in Peru. And similar to other cases recorded in distant Ireland or in the neighboring country of Chile.

The Sodalicio case, explains activist Anna Barret-Doyle, “is similar to what happens around the globe, and the Church knows it.”

Other activists agree, such as the former Mexican priest Alberto Athié, who left the priesthood when he found out that the Church is hiding cases of pedophilia, according to what he said yesterday during a conversation organized by the organization defending sexual rights Promsex and Lamula.pe in Lima.

“You have to confront the sayings with the facts. What does Pope Francis intend ? The protection of his image and of the Holy See. He has apologized to the victims, but that is not enough. It is not enough to forgive because before there is justice, “he said.

Church in crisis

For the ex-priest Athié, the Catholic Church faces a serious crisis of credibility worldwide due to its lack of transparency in cases of sexual abuse. “The Pope knows it perfectly,” he said.

“There is an immensity of cases of sexual abuse in Latin America. The church sends to this region and to Africa persecuted priests in Europe and the United States for sexual crimes. Poor and marginalized children are abused and can hardly make the complaint, “he added.

For his part, the American lawyer and activist Tim Law warned that the pope’s message does not agree with his actions.

“It says: ‘No more secrets’, but at the same time the Church does not make public the list of sexual aggressors,” he said.

Finally, the former vice president of the Committee on the Rights of the Child of the UN , the Ecuadorian Sara Oviedo, clarified that the denunciations and questions against the Catholic Church are carried out because it “covers up its members accused of sexual abuse, instead of collaborating with Justice”.

More testimonials

The author of the book “Sins of the Fathers”, the Jamaican Denise Buchanan, participated in the discussion and told that she was a victim of sexual abuse by members of the Catholic Church.

He narrated that he still suffers the consequences of the tragedy he experienced.

“My social life is dramatic even today. I have achieved success in other aspects of life, but not emotionally. The person who spoke to me about God abused me and I got pregnant. That was devastating, “he said.

“I can not have children and I’ve divorced twice. And they ask me to turn the page! Buchanan added.

They sent a letter to the Nunciature to be received by the head of the Catholic Church in the world and talk about the injustice generated by the pardon that the former dictator Alberto Fujimori received.

“We are still waiting for an answer. There is nothing official so far, and the timetable for the visit of Pope Francis has already come out, “he said, in a dialogue with La República .

It is also not known if the Pope will meet with the victims of sexual, physical and psychological abuse of Sodalicio.he silence of the Catholic Church in allegations of pedophilia.

Note: This is an Abuse Tracker excerpt. Click the title to view the full text of the original article. If the original article is no longer available, see our News Archive.

Papa Francisco: Plan de seguridad incluye la prohibición de marchas

LIMA (PERU)
La República

>>Pope Francisco: Security plan includes the prohibition of marches

January 18, 2018

Más de 2.600 policías y miembros de las Fuerzas Armadas estarán encargados de garantizar la seguridad del Sumo Pontífice y ciudadanos que asistan a la misa.

El plan para garantizar la seguridad del papa Francisco en su visita al país quedó listo e incluye labores de inteligencia para evitar posibles imprevistos, aseguró ayer el ministro del Interior, Vicente Romero.

“La seguridad está montada sobre un esquema de prevención y el cuidado del minuto a minuto de Su Santidad por todos los lugares donde se desplazará”, indicó.

[Google Translation: More than 2,600 policemen and members of the Armed Forces will be in charge of guaranteeing the security of the Supreme Pontiff and citizens who attend the mass .

The plan to ensure the safety of Pope Francis in his visit to the country was ready and includes intelligence work to avoid possible unforeseen events, said Interior Minister Vicente Romero yesterday .

“The security is mounted on a prevention scheme and the minute-by-minute care of His Holiness for all the places where he will move,” he said.

In addition, the General Directorate of Interior Government reported that guarantees will not be granted for marches or mobilizations during the visit of Pope Francis to the country, from January 18 to 21.

For this last city, it has been planned to displace 2,600 policemenwho will have the support of the Armed Forces. “We need the population to trust all the entities of the State that are committed to security,” Minister Romero said.

For Sunday 21, a total of 510 policemen, distributed in the 17 doors of entrance to the air base Las Palmas, will have the mission to check the faithful who attend the massive mass of Pope Francis .

“We ask the population to have patience and peace of mind that this will be done in the established times,” said General EP Jorge Chavez, head of Indeci.]

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Víctimas de abusos en Perú piden al Papa que se haga justicia

BONN (GERMANY)
Deutsche Welle

>>Victims of abuse in Peru ask the Pope to do justice

[Note: Includes a brief video interview via Skype with Darío Menor Torres.]

Activistas y víctimas de países como México, Ecuador o Alemania pidieron que los clérigos denunciados sean remitidos “a la justicia común”.

Activistas y víctimas de abusos sexuales afirmaron este miércoles (17.01.2018) en Lima que el papa Francisco debe “remitir a la justicia común, para que sean sancionados como corresponde”, a los clérigos católicos denunciados por casos de este tipo.

“La Iglesia no puede ser responsable por personas que, en cualquier tipo de circunstancias, son unos abusadores”, afirmó la ecuatoriana Sara Oviedo, exvicepresidenta del Comité de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas (ONU).

Oviedo participó en una exposición ante la prensa realizada por integrantes del grupo TAP o The Accountability Proyect (Proyecto de rendición de cuentas), un día antes del inicio de una visita oficial y apostólica del papa Francisco a Perú. En la presentación estuvieron el mexicano Alberto Athié, el británico Peter Saunders, el alemán Matthias Katsch y los norteamericanos Tim Law, Denisse Buchanan y Anne Barrett Doyle.

[Google Translation: Activists and victims of countries like Mexico, Ecuador or Germany asked that the denounced clerics be referred “to the common justice”.

Activists and victims of sexual abuse affirmed this Wednesday (17.01.2018) in Lima that Pope Francis must “refer to the common justice, so that they are punished as appropriate”, to the Catholic clerics denounced by cases of this type.

“The Church can not be responsible for people who, in any type of circumstances, are abusers,” said Ecuadorian Sara Oviedo, former vice president of the United Nations Human Rights Committee (UN).

Oviedo participated in an exhibition before the press made by members of the TAP group or The Accountability Project, a day before the beginning of an official and apostolic visit of Pope Francis to Peru. In the presentation were the Mexican Alberto Athié, the British Peter Saunders, the German Matthias Katsch and the North Americans Tim Law, Denisse Buchanan and Anne Barrett Doyle.

The ex-UN official said that the victims of abuse also ask to “separate from their positions clerics who are known, or suspect, to have committed some type of abuse.” He also considered that the canon law should be modified so that these cases can no longer be considered “only as a moral violation” and that the church should find mechanisms to denounce these crimes, as well as address them in the formation of priests and education of children in reporting mechanisms.

Athié, a former priest who discovered one of the first cases of abuse perpetrated in Mexico by the founder of the Legionaries of Christ, Marcial Maciel, said that the victims’ denunciations “have met with a wall” in the Catholic Church. “You have to confront the sayings, the facts and the gestures,” he said before emphasizing that “forgiveness is not enough, that is a very important value, but first there is the truth.”

Matthias Katsch, co-founder of an association of victims of child abuse, said he participates in these activities “as a survivor”, since he was abused in a Jesuit school. “We have the opportunity to show people that they have been victims in the past that we have opportunities today,” he said before pointing out that the Catholic Church has a “responsibility” as a “global institution that trains children”.

Cases like those of the Sodalicio organization

Barret Doyle added, meanwhile, that in Peru they have to deepen investigations of cases such as those of the Catholic organization Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana, which came to light after the publication in 2015 of the book “Mitad monjes, mitad soldados”, of the Peruvian journalists Pedro Salinas and Paola Ugaz. He considered that, in addition to the intervention of Sodalicio announced by the Pope last week, he could ask that the founder of that group, Luis Figari, who is currently staying in Rome, be extradited to Peru.

The activist remarked that the denunciations about the Legionaries of Christ, in Mexico; Karadima, in Chile, or Sodalicio, in Peru, “these are cases of victims with economic means”. “We have not yet heard of cases of poor victims, and the poor are especially vulnerable,” he concluded.]

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Cardinal Law, disgraced figure in church abuse scandal, dies

LOCKEFORD (CA)
Express Newsline

January 18, 2018

Cardinal Bernard Law, the Archbishop emeritus of Boston who resigned in 2002 amid a clergy sex abuse scandal, died Wednesday [December 20, 2017] at the age of 86.

“Spotlight” star Mark Ruffalo is not mourning the death of Cardinal Bernard Law, formerly the archbishop of Boston. “Where are we going to celebrate?” said Robert Casarlo, an abuse victim who spoke during a press conference in Boston Wednesday.

Law was once one of the most important figures in the US church, wielding considerable influence inside the Vatican.

Speaking to reporters, some survivors gathered to reflect on Law’s death and the abuse they suffered by the priests he oversaw in Boston.

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Armidale detectives investigating new report of alleged historical abuse by retired Armidale priest David Joseph Perrett

ARMIDALE (NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA)
Armidale Express

January 18, 2018

By Breanna Chillingworth

A court has been told detectives are investigating more alleged claims of historical sex abuse by a retired priest.

David Joseph Perrett returned to Armidale Local Court on Wednesday morning facing 62 charges, accused of molesting more than a dozen boys in the 1970s and 80s.

Magistrate Michael Holmes was told officers needed more time to investigate after another complainant contacted police, alleging abuse.

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Priest Found Guilty of Violent Sex Acts with Children at Orthodox Christian Youth Camps

NEW YORK (NY)
Newsweek

January 17, 2018

By Cristina Maza

An Orthodox priest in Russia was sentenced to 14 years in a high-security penal colony for “especially cynical” violent sexual acts with minors.

The abuse took place at Orthodox youth camps in Russia and Greece between 2009 and 2013, according to local reports on Wednesday.

The priest, Gleb Grozovsky, fled to Israel after police opened a criminal investigation into the abuse in 2013, but he was extradited to Russia in 2016 to stand trial. The trial was held behind closed doors and lasted for seven months.

Grozovsky continues to maintain his innocence and says he will appeal the ruling. Defense lawyers say Grozovsky is a victim of religious and political persecution. A website in English, Russian, Arabic and Hebrew that claims to belong to Grozovsky’s sister says that the court limited the priest’s ability to know what he was charged with, but the website has not been updated since last year.

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January 17, 2018

Texto y video: Saludo del Papa a los jóvenes de Chile en el Santuario de Maipú

LIMA (PERU_
ACI Prensa / EWTN

>>Greeting of the Pope to the youth of Chile at the Shrine of Maipú

January 17, 2018

El Papa Francisco sostuvo un emotivo y alegre encuentro con los jóvenes en el Santuario Nacional de Maipú, a quienes alentó a preguntarse constantemente qué haría Cristo en su lugar.

A continuación el texto completo de las palabras del Santo Padre:

Yo también Ariel estoy gozoso de estar con ustedes. Gracias por tus palabras de bienvenida en nombre de todos los aquí presentes. Simplemente estoy agradecido por compartir este tiempo como ustedes, que según leí: ahí se bajaron del sofá y se pusieron los zapatos. Gracias. Considero, para mí, importante poder encontrarnos y caminar juntos un rato, ¡Que nos ayudemos a mirar hacia delante! y creo también para ustedes es importante!. Gracias.

Y me alegra que este encuentro se realice aquí en Maipú. En esta tierra donde con un abrazo de fraternidad se fundó la historia de Chile; en este Santuario que se levanta en el cruce de los caminos del Norte y del Sur, que une la nieve y el océano, y hace que el cielo y la tierra tengan un hogar. Hogar para Chile, hogar para ustedes queridos jóvenes, donde la Virgen del Carmen los espera, los recibe con el corazón abierto.

[Partial Google Translation: Pope Francis held an emotional and joyful encounter with the young people in the National Shrine of Maipú, whom he encouraged to constantly ask themselves what Christ would do in his place.

Here is the full text of the words of the Holy Father:

I, too, Ariel, I am glad to be with you. Thank you for your words of welcome on behalf of all present here. I am just grateful to share this time as you, as I read: there they got off the couch and put on their shoes. Thank you. I consider, for me, important to be able to meet and walk together for a while, that we help us to look forward! and I think it’s important to you too! Thank you.

And I’m glad that this meeting takes place here in Maipú. In this land where the history of Chile was founded with a hug of fraternity; in this Shrine that rises at the junction of the North and South roads, that unites the snow and the ocean, and makes heaven and earth a home. Home for Chile, home for you dear young people, where the Virgin of Carmen awaits you, receives you with an open heart.

And as he accompanied the birth of this Nation and accompanied so many Chileans throughout these two hundred years, he wants to continue accompanying the dreams that God puts in your heart: dreams of freedom, dreams of joy, dreams of a better future.

You want, as you said Ariel, to ‘be protagonists of change’. Be protagonists. The Virgin of Carmen accompanies them so that they are the protagonists of the Chile that their hearts dream of. And I know that the heart of young Chileans dreams, and dreams big, not only when they are a little ‘curaditos’, no. They always dream big, because of these lands have been born experiences that were expanding and multiplying throughout various countries of our continent.]

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La visita del papa a Perú vuelve a poner a la luz los casos de abuso en el Sodalicio

NEW YORK (NY)
New York Times (en español)

>>The Pope’s visit to Peru once again brings to light cases of abuse in the Sodalicio

16 de enero de 2018

Por Silvia Viñas

Londres – En las paredes de su cuarto en Colonia, Alemania, donde vivió los últimos años, no había un solo rastro que revelara que Álvaro Urbina era peruano. Nada recordaba al país donde había nacido y vivido hasta los 23 años, cuando decidió marcharse. “Dejé un poco atrás mi vida en el Perú”, dijo, una tarde del 2017, “y muchas veces me duele mucho recordar”.

Urbina se fue de Lima en 2004 y durante más de una década trató de evitar el pasado; pero un día del 2015, mientras revisaba Facebook, se topó con una noticia que lo obligó a recordar: el artículo decía que a Luis Fernando Figari y a Germán Doig —dos altos dirigentes del Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana, una sociedad católica a la que él se había unido de adolescente— se les acusaba de abusar sexual, física y psicológicamente de menores de edad y adultos jóvenes.

El Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana fue fundado en Perú en 1971 por Luis Fernando Figari, uno de los primeros líderes de la organización acusados de abuso por exsodálites, cuyos testimonios dieron a conocer los periodistas Pedro Salinas y Paola Ugaz. Esta sociedad católica —formada por sacerdotes y laicos como Figari y aprobada por el papa Juan Pablo II— ha buscado establecer un grupo de religiosos devotos que viven en comunidad. Desde su fundación, el Sodalicio ha concentrado sus esfuerzos de evangelización entre la elite peruana, pero también tiene presencia en toda América Latina y en Estados Unidos. Algunos medios han reportado que la organización cuenta con más de 20.000 seguidores.

Después de ver aquella noticia, Álvaro Urbina siguió buscando y leyó en un blog que Jeffery Daniels, su antiguo guía espiritual en el Sodalicio, presuntamente había abusado de una cantidad indeterminada de adolescentes. No lo podía creer: “Yo estaba tan ciego que nunca supe que yo no había sido el único. Por eso siempre me quedé callado”, dijo esa tarde de abril en Colonia, donde vivía desde el 2012. Entonces decidió contar su historia: unos meses después, su testimonio salía publicado en la prensa peruana.

[Google Translation: On the walls of his room in Cologne, Germany, where he lived in recent years, there was not a single trace that revealed that Alvaro Urbina was Peruvian. Nothing remembered the country where he was born and lived until he was 23, when he decided to leave. “I left my life a little behind in Peru,” he said, one afternoon in 2017, “and many times it hurts a lot to remember.”

Urbina left Lima in 2004 and for more than a decade tried to avoid the past; but one day in 2015, while reviewing Facebook, he ran into a story that forced him to remember: the article said that Luis Fernando Figari and Germán Doig – two senior leaders of the Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana, a Catholic society to which he had joined as a teenager – they were accused of abusing sexually, physically and psychologically minors and young adults.

The Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana was founded in Peru in 1971 by Luis Fernando Figari, one of the first leaders of the organization accused of abuse by exsodálites, whose testimonies were made known by journalists Pedro Salinas and Paola Ugaz. This Catholic society – formed by priests and laymen like Figari and approved by Pope John Paul II – has sought to establish a group of devout religious who live in community. Since its founding, Sodalicio has concentrated its evangelization efforts among the Peruvian elite, but it also has a presence throughout Latin America and the United States. Some media have reported that the organization has more than 20,000 followers .

After seeing that news, Álvaro Urbina continued to search and read in a blog that Jeffery Daniels, his former spiritual guide in Sodalicio, allegedly abused an undetermined number of teenagers. I could not believe it: “I was so blind that I never knew that I had not been the only one. That’s why I always kept quiet, “he said that April afternoon in Cologne, where he had lived since 2012. He then decided to tell his story: a few months later, his testimony was published in the Peruvian press .

Urbina is 36 years old, with long dreadlocks and clear eyes. He is the only victim of Daniels who has given his name publicly to tell what he lived. “We could say that is my payment method for all this,” he said.

When he decided to do so, it was still almost two years before the Public Ministry of Peru requested preventive detention for his former spiritual guide, Jeffery Daniels, and three other ex-leaders of Sodalicio, including Figari. The founder of Sodalicio and seven ex-leaders were denounced in May 2016 for the crimes of kidnapping, serious injuries and illicit association to commit a crime.

The story of Urbina is part of a special episode of Radio Ambulante on the victims of this organization that is broadcast today, one month after the request for preventive detention against ex-leaders of the Sodalicio and two days before the visit of Pope Francis to Peru, the first of a pontiff to the country in thirty years.

On Wednesday, January 10, a week after his arrival, the press office of the Vatican informed that Francisco had ordered the Sodalicio to intervene because of the concern generated by “all the information that, for several years, has been coming” about the organization.

‘There was no way to escape for me’

Álvaro Urbina was 14 years old when he went to his first activity organized by Sodalicio. There he met Jeffery Daniels, who was twice his age. At that time, in the mid-nineties, Daniels was one of the laity who led groups of adolescents between 12 and 16 years. Organized activities, outings and trips. It addressed religious themes in a fun and accessible way for young people.

Daniels was known for his jovial attitude, for making jokes and being “chacotero”, says Urbina. That irreverence was not what he expected from a religious leader: “It was lucky for him that we liked him very much,” he says. Daniels was also affectionate and Urbina says that it made him feel that “you could trust him with your problems, any kind of problems”. Bullying, sex, your parents. “He became your best friend.”

That connection was something Urbina wanted. He did not fit in his private upper class school in Lima; he had bad grades, his classmates harassed him, and he was in danger of being suspended for indiscipline. His parents had recently separated and his father had left the country. In that group led by Daniels, Urbina felt safe. “They made me feel happy,” she says, “they gave me a reason to smile, that was something that I lacked since my dad left.”

One day, after one of his first outings with the group, Daniels left him home. He parked the car and began to talk to him about the trust: he told him that if he was able to trust him, he would lower his pants, says Urbina. Then he asked her to pull her underpants down. “And I did too,” Urbina says now, and recalls that Daniels reviewed him as if he were doing a medical inspection.

After another exit the scene was repeated, but Urbina says that this time it had a sexual tone. For that lonely 14-year-old boy, what happened with Daniels felt like the beginning of a relationship. “I mean, he knew what he was giving me. Then, of course, from that point of view he had me completely tied psychologically, “he says.

At first Daniels visited him once or twice a week, even when Urbina stopped going to Sodalicio’s activities. And during the nearly two years of their sexual encounters, Urbina says that Daniels never had to ask him to keep what they were doing secret. “It was not necessary,” Urbina says, “talking to my mother or something like that would have been, to my best friend and the person I trusted the most, to throw it to the lions. There was no way to escape for me. ”

Until suddenly, without warning, Daniels stopped visiting. After months without having news, Urbina called the house of Sodalicio where Daniels lived. The person who answered told him he had moved. Soon Urbina ran into him on a beach near Lima. Remember that Daniels “had a mad face upset,” who spoke for a minute and told him he had to go. “That was the last time I talked to him.”

Five years later, Urbina left Peru and would not know about Daniels until twelve years later, when he read the article with the accusations and decided to tell his story. “If I had known at that time, if I had noticed, if I had not been so blind. What do I know, so many ‘if there were’, “he told me that afternoon in Germany.

In February 2017, Sodalicio’s website published a report that says Daniels “has been accused of sexual abuse of at least twelve young men”, but according to witnesses, there are more victims who have not reported it. The document is the result of an investigation carried out by international experts commissioned by Alessandro Moroni, who is listed as Superior General of Sodalicio on the organization’s website.

Urbina’s experience is now part of an extensive list of testimonies detailing sexual, physical and psychological abuse by Sodalicio leaders. Many are registered in the book Half monks, half soldiers , written by the journalist and exsodálite Pedro Salinas and the journalist Paola Ugaz.

The book, published in 2015, is the result of five years of research. It gathers thirty testimonies pointing to Figari, retired since the end of 2010 and currently in Rome; Doig, who died in 2001, and Daniels, who according to recent reports in the Chicago Tribune , lives in the state of Illinois, in the United States. Ugaz tells that since they began their investigation, at the end of 2010, they have collected more than a hundred testimonies.

Within the Sodalicio the accusations were not new. According to the aforementioned report, a minor reported to Figari of sexual abuse in 1975, four years after Sodalicio was founded. In the following years there were more denunciations against Figari, Doig, Daniels and others. But the first articles on physical and psychological abuse did not come out until 2000, thanks to a series of columns written by the exsodálite José Enrique Escardó Steck for Gente magazine . As with the cases of the Chilean priest Fernando Karadima or the Mexican Marcial Maciel , it took decades to uncover these abuses.

In the case of Karadima, The New York Times revealed the first denunciations against him in 2010. The accusations dated back to the eighties. In February 2011, the Vatican declared the Chilean priest guilty of sexually abusing minors and ordered him to retire to a life of prayer. Five years earlier he had ordered the retirement of the Mexican Marcial Maciel, founder of the Order of the Legionaries of Christ and accused of abusing minors for decades. Maciel died in 2008.

In the case of Figari, the Vatican ordered him not to return to Peru – “except for very serious reasons” and with written permission – not to contact Sodalites and not to talk to the media. These indications are part of a letter of January 2017 addressed to Moroni, where they report on the result of an “apostolic visit” that sought to verify the accusations against the founder of Sodalicio.

In May 2016, Pedro Salinas and four ex-Sodalites sued Figari and other former leaders of the organization for crimes of kidnapping, serious injuries and conspiracy to commit a crime. The prosecutor in charge of the case questioned Figari in Rome. However, in January 2017 the prosecution filed the case alleging that there was not enough evidence and that the crimes had been prescribed.

But two months later another prosecutor reopened the case and on December 13 the Public Ministry requested nine months of preventive detention for Figari, Daniels and two other ex-leaders of Sodalicio: Virgilio Levaggi and Daniel Murguía.

The request for preventive detention was made public one month after Pope Francis visited Peru. Congressman Alberto de Belaunde, who led the creation of a special commission to investigate the Sodalicio, sent a letter to the representative of the pope in Peru requesting that the pontiff meet with the victims of the Sodalicio during his visit from January 18 to 21.

Until Monday, January 15, Belaunde’s request had not received a response. But, eight days before Francisco’s arrival, the Vatican announced the intervention of Sodalicio, what some have considered more a public relations maneuver than a real commitment to transform the organization.

Álvaro Urbina returned to Peru in August 2017, after thirteen years abroad. Now he works as a surf photographer on a beach north of Lima. “I went abroad to find answers,” he says. “Now I’m here looking to settle my roots and help as much as possible.” One of the first things he did back in Lima was to testify in the Office of the Prosecutor. “If I can help a child not to be touched by that beast, then more than happy to do so, more than happy.”]

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Confirman reunión reservada del Papa con víctimas de abusos sexuales por religiosos

CONCEPCIÓN, CHILE
BioBioChile

>>Confirmed meeting of the Pope reserved with victims of sexual abuse by religious

January 16, 2018

By Alberto González

El papa Francisco se reunió este martes con un grupo de víctimas de abusos sexuales por parte de sacerdotes, según informó el portavoz del romano pontífice.

“El Santo Padre se ha reunido hoy en la Nunciatura Apostólica de Santiago de Chile, después del almuerzo, con un pequeño grupo de víctimas de abusos sexuales por parte de sacerdotes”, reza un comunicado enviado por el Vaticano.

Las víctimas “han podido contar sus sufrimientos al Papa Francisco, que les ha escuchado y ha rezado y llorado con ellos”, agrega el comunicado.

La identidad de los participantes se revelará si estos quieren hacerlo público, agregaron las fuentes del Vaticano que convocaron una conferencia de prensa para dar a conocer esta información.

[Google Translation: The Pope Francis met Tuesday with a group of victims of sexual abuse by priests, according to the spokesman of the Roman pontiff.

“The Holy Father met today at the Apostolic Nunciature of Santiago de Chile, after lunch, with a small group of victims of sexual abuse by priests,” reads a statement sent by the Vatican.

The victims “have been able to tell their sufferings to Pope Francis, who has listened to them and has prayed and cried with them,” the statement added.

The identity of the participants will be revealed if they want to make it public, added the Vatican sources that convened a press conference to publicize this information.

On two occasions during his first day of official visit to Chile, the Pope spoke of the “shame” and “pain” he feels for the sexual abuse perpetrated by the clergy against minors.

“I can not help but express the pain and the shame I feel at the irreparable damage caused to children by ministers of the Church,” the pope said before the country’s authorities in La Moneda, prompting applause from the audience.

Later, in a meeting with religious in the cathedral of Santiago, Francisco urged them to have “the courage to ask for forgiveness”.

“I know that sometimes they have suffered insults in the subway or walking down the street; that being dressed as a priest in many places is paying dearly, “said the Pope, visibly worried about this issue that not only tarnishes the image of the Church, but is producing a galloping distrust of the Chileans in the institution.

In Chile, nearly 80 religious abused minors since 2000, according to a list distributed last week by the American NGO Bishop Accountability.

“It does not serve forgiveness, shame and pain if it does not come with the corresponding actions”, published Juan Andrés Murillo, anti-abuse activist and one of the complainants in 2010 of the emblematic case of Fernando Karadima, when several men reported having been abused in his youth by the powerful priest, condemned by the Vatican to “a life of prayer and penance”.]

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Víctimas de Karadima y reunión del papa Francisco: “No fuimos invitados”

CONCEPCIÓN, CHILE
BioBioChile

>>Victims of Karadima and meeting of Pope Francis: “We were not invited”

By Alberto González and Nicole Martinez

Las víctimas de Fernando Karadima revelaron que no fueron invitados a la reservada reunión que sostuvo el papa Francisco con víctimas de abusos sexuales por parte del clero de la iglesia Católica.

A través de una declaración conjunta, James Hamilton, Juan Andrés Murillo y Juan Carlos Cruz, se refirieron a la cita privada que sostuvo el obispo de Roma con un pequeño grupo de víctimas, según confirmó el vocero del Vaticano.

“Nos han contado que el Papa se juntó con víctimas de abusos sexuales del clero. Nos han preguntado si nosotros -James, José Andrés y Juan Carlos- estuvimos en esa reunión. No, no fuimos invitados”, indicaron.

[Google Translation: The victims of Fernando Karadima revealed that they were not invited to the reserved meeting held by Pope Francis with victims of sexual abuse by the clergy of the Catholic Church.

Through a joint statement, James Hamilton, Juan Andrés Murillo and Juan Carlos Cruz, referred to the private appointment held by the Bishop of Rome with a small group of victims, as confirmed by the Vatican spokesman.

“We have been told that the Pope met with victims of sexual abuse by the clergy. They asked us if we -James, José Andrés and Juan Carlos- were in that meeting. No, we were not invited, “they said.

However, they valued the meeting of the Roman Pontiff with the victims, although they warned that the important thing is for the Church to take action on the issue.

“We appreciate that those victims who met with the Pope had a direct word from the highest authority of the Catholic Church,” they said.

Recall that as confirmed by the Vatican, the identities of the people who participated in the meeting will be kept in reserve by the Church, so it is unknown who participated in the meeting.

However, the victims of Karadima would not be the only ones to suffer abuses by religious in our country. According to a list distributed last week by the American NGO Bishop Accountability, nearly 80 religious abused minors since 2000.

“We hope that the words to those victims, are not all that is done. And concrete actions are taken that punish those responsible for all the victims and establish the justice that should and should have in each of the cases. This includes removing cover-up bishops and appointments that facilitate the escape of a victimizer from the action of justice, “they added.

“We are convinced that all the victims who went through this hell, hope that all concrete measures are taken so that these crimes against humanity never happen again,” they concluded.]

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No basta solo pedir perdón

LIMA (PERU)
La República

>>It is not enough to just ask for forgiveness

January 17, 2018

By Augusto Álvarez Rodrich

La iglesia frente a sacerdotes y religiosos que son pedófilos.

Algo incorrecto ocurre en la iglesia católica cuando un pedido de perdón del papa Francisco por los graves casos de pedofilia de sacerdotes se vuelve noticia.

“No puedo dejar de manifestar el dolor y la vergüenza que siento ante el daño irreparable causado a niños por parte de ministros de la iglesia. Sé que es justo pedir perdón y apoyar a las víctimas, además estamos empeñados para que no se vuelva a repetir”, dijo ayer en Chile, donde la iglesia católica sufre un severo desprestigio por los abusos sexuales que han generado más de 80 denuncias.

Pero peor fue el blindaje a sacerdotes involucrados en pedofilia por parte del Vaticano expresado en que Francisco designó como obispo de Osorno a Juan Barros, alguien a quien las víctimas de los abusos señalan como muy cercano a ese monstruo eclesiástico de Fernando Karadima.

En el Perú tenemos un problema parecido: los abusos sexuales y psicológicos realizados en el Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana, ante los cuales el arzobispado de Lima no actuó con la diligencia requerida, lo cual generó una demanda al cardenal Juan Luis Cipriani ante el Ministerio Público.

Sin embargo, estas denuncias fueron imposibles de negar cuando apareció Mitad monjes, mitad soldados, de Pedro Salinas y Paola Ugaz.

[Google Translation: The church in front of priests and religious who are pedophiles.

Something wrong happens in the Catholic Church when a request for forgiveness from Pope Francis for the serious cases of pedophilia of priests becomes news.

“I can not help but express the pain and shame I feel at the irreparable damage inflicted on children by church ministers. I know it is fair to ask for forgiveness and support the victims, and we are committed so that it does not happen again, “he said yesterday in Chile, where the Catholic Church suffers a severe loss of prestige for the sexual abuse that has generated more than 80 complaints.

But worse was the shielding of priests involved in pedophilia on the part of the Vatican, expressed in that Francisco designated as bishop of Osorno Juan Barros, someone whom the victims of the abuses point out as very close to that ecclesiastical monster of Fernando Karadima.

In Peru we have a similar problem: the sexual and psychological abuses carried out in the Sodalicio de Vida Cristiana, before which the archbishopric of Lima did not act with the required diligence, which generated a demand to Cardinal Juan Luis Cipriani before the Public Ministry.

However, these denunciations were impossible to deny when Mitad monks appeared, half soldiers, of Pedro Salinas and Paola Ugaz.

The judicial case has advanced but not enough. Although he did it a few days before Francisco’s visit to Peru, the Vatican has done well to order Sodalicio’s intervention.

What, however, remains unprecedented is the shielding of the Vatican to that defendant of pedophilia with very solid evidence that is the founder of Sodalicio Luis Fernando Figari.

Last year, the Vatican decided that Figari should remain in Italy and not return to Peru. The problem is that the Peruvian justice requires it to prosecute him for serious crimes.

For the Pope’s requests for forgiveness to make real sense, the Vatican must contribute to putting priests and religious accused of rape in justice instead of covering them up.

Cover-up that includes the Peruvian political sector expressed in the outrageous support of Fuerza Popular to the rapists of the Sodalicio.

And that must reach all cases. From the Sodalicio linked to the right, to the left as those of the Héctor de Cárdenas school.

93% of Peruvians surveyed by Ipsos believe that Pope Francis should have a position of greater condemnation with priests and religious who have committed abuses against minors. I hope that Pope Francis will do much more in Peru than just ask for forgiveness.]

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Former Perth Catholic school teacher on historic child sex abuse charges

PERTH (WESTERN AUSTRALIA)
Perth Now

January 16, 2018

A former teacher at two Perth Catholic colleges is facing historic child sex abuse charges dating back as far as 1979.

The 71-year-old man has been charged with four counts of aggravated indecent assault, three counts of indecent dealing of a child and one of indecently assaulting a man.

The allegations stem from the Royal Commission into institutional responses to child sexual offences.

The first offences allegedly occurred in 1979 when the man was a teacher at a Catholic school in Bedford.

Police allege the man indecently assaulted a boy three times, twice when he was 13 years old and once when the boy had turned 14.

It is also alleged that between 1986 and 1987, the man sexually assaulted a boy who was 13 years old at the time of the first offence.

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Carolyn Bennett asks Catholic groups to allow residential school survivors to have documents outlining abuse made public

TORONTO (ONTARIO, CANADA)
Globe and Mail

January 15, 2018

By Gloria Galloway

The federal government is urging Catholic groups that ran Indian residential schools to allow former students who settled their abuse cases before a compensation deal was signed with school survivors to file their court documents with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

Justice Department lawyers say permission from both the government and the Catholic entities is required before abuse survivors who launched court cases before 2006, when the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) was struck, can house papers related to their cases at the centre in Winnipeg that is chronicling the schools’ tragic legacy.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in December the government will waive the privilege it asserts over the records pertaining to the lawsuit launched by Angela Shisheesh for the hardships she endured at the infamous St. Anne’s Residential School in Fort Albany, Ont., where former students say they were tortured in a makeshift electric chair and forced to eat their own vomit.

Carolyn Bennett, the Minister for Crown-Indigenous Relations, has written a letter that is being sent to the roughly 50 Catholic entities that ran the schools asking them to do the same for everyone in Ms. Shisheesh’s situation – essentially requesting that the Church allow more documents detailing the abuse suffered by the students to be made public.

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Leadership style, a comparison between Dr. King and Pope Francis

KANSAS CITY (MO)
National Catholic Reporter

January 16, 2018

By Ken Briggs

Martin Luther King Jr.’s words left an indelible mark on our eyes and our ears. Nothing but the Gettysburg Address is so imprinted on the scroll of American history than the “I Have a Dream” speech, to cite only the most incandescent of his exhortations. That legacy also bolsters the case for Providence. If he had preached earlier or later in the century, his eloquence and charisma might have been limited by circumstance. One could argue that he appeared on stage at just the right time, now unimaginable at any other.

As it happened, Dr. King delivered his soaring message as television coverage was ramping up its McLuhan-esque “medium is message” magic of immensely powerful, enigmatic impact. Its scope ballooned to national and international dimensions. A decade or two earlier, he would have been limited principally to radio and movie theater film clips. His influence would surely have been felt, but his suddenly emergence as a major figure in the cultural and political realm would likely have needed much more time to ripen. And the time for such a prophet and activist was ripe right then.

* * *

Remembering Dr. King reminds me of Pope Francis’ style of leadership. He is a compassionate prophet full of pleas for the poor, the victims of brutality, the visionaries of a kinder, gentler church and the welfare of suffering human kind in general. In that, he reflects a loving, self-less posture that sends a clear message no less profound than Dr. King’s. So far, though, nearly five years into his papacy, he has not appeared at the barricades or directed the church to place its assets, its personnel or its ethical partisanship behind any social or political efforts to shift power away from the tyranny of wealth and oppression, except very indirectly.

Pope John Paul II (be careful what you wish for) gained stature by aiding the particular force, solidarity, to gain success over communism. He deputized then Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger to run followers of liberation theology out of town. Those kinds of actions probably contributed more than anything else to the “Great” designation tacked on to his memorial. By no means does that require Francis to follow similar strategies, but he might translate some of his wise words into actions that give form to them.

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German diocese of Trier to pay €450,000 to church abuse victims

BONN (GERMANY)
Deutsche Welle

January 15, 2018

By David Martin

The Trier diocese has agreed to pay out almost half-a-million euro to abuse victims. The gesture comes eight years after the Catholic Church in Germany was rocked by reports of sexual abuse going back decades.

The Trier diocese — one of the oldest Roman Catholic parishes in Germany — announced on Monday it was paying €453,000 to 90 victims who suffered abuse at the hands of the Catholic Church.

Judith Rupp, a spokeswoman for the diocese, said the victims had received “material benefit in recognition of their suffering.” Altogether, 135 alleged victims had initially applied for compensation.

Rupp also stressed that the money would not come from the church tax – a monthly fee paid by Germans who register themselves with the state as Roman Catholic – but solely by the diocese itself.

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Abuse survivor confronts gymnastics doctor: ‘I have been coming for you for a long time’

WASHINGTON (DC)
Washington Post

January 17, 2018

By Kyle Swenson

Two school pictures floated side-by-side on a projection screen in the Michigan courtroom.

Both images caught the same small girl — in one, all gawky smile and bangs; the next, braces and long hair — a few years apart. Until this week, the child in the snapshots had been officially identified only as “Victim Z.A.” or “a family friend.”

But on Tuesday, Kyle Stephens, now a young woman, stepped out from the curtain of anonymity to directly address disgraced USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar before a judge in Lansing.

“I was the first to testify in this case, and worried of the attention that could come of that, I asked for complete anonymity,” Stephens explained, the pictures of her projected over her shoulder stemming from the time of her abuse. “I’m addressing you publicly today as a final step and statement to myself that I have nothing to be ashamed of.”

* * *

“I have been coming for you for a long time,” she told Nassar, who hid his eyes beneath his hand through the testimony. “I’ve told counselors your name in hopes they would report you. I’ve told your name to Child Protective Services twice. I gave a testament to get your medical license revoked. You were first arrested on my charges. And now as the only nonmedical victim to come forward, I testify to let the world know you are a repulsive liar.”

* * *

When she was 12 years old, thanks to news accounts of the Catholic Church priest abuse and a friend’s own story about molestation, Stephens realized what was happening. She told her parents about what Nassar had been doing to her. Her parents confronted their friend.

“Due to complex details that I won’t get into here, my parents choose to believe Larry Nassar over me,” she said. Convinced their daughter had made a false allegation against a friend, Stephens’s parents brought Nassar over to their home to speak to her. Nassar told her, “No one should ever do that, and if they do, you should tell someone,” Stephens told the court.

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Pope Francis meets sex abuse victims in Chile

LONDON (ENGLAND)
BBC

January 17, 2018

Pope Francis has met a group of victims of sexual abuse by priests in Chile.

The meeting at the Vatican’s mission in Santiago was “strictly private”, his office said, providing no further details.

Earlier during his visit to Chile, the Pope felt “pain and shame” over the sex abuse scandal, asking the victims for forgiveness.

He has been criticised in Chile for a decision to ordain a bishop accused of covering up sexual abuse by a priest.

Francis also mentioned the issue when he said Mass for some 400,000 people in Santiago on Tuesday.

“I know the pain of these cases of child abuse and I am following how much is needed to overcome this serious and painful evil,” he said.

He spoke of his sympathy with “victims and their families, who have seen their trust in ministers of the Church betrayed”.

* * *

On Monday, activists fighting for the rights of sexual abuse victims gathered in Santiago for a conference.

They launched an organisation called Ending Clerical Abuse which “seeks to stop child sexual abuse by the clergy” worldwide.

One of the activists, Juan Carlos Cruz, told the BBC: “[Saying sorry] is not sufficient for a survivor. What we want is for the Pope to take action.”

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Pope Francis meets with sex abuse victims in Chile

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Catholic News Agency

January 16, 2018

Pope Francis met privately Tuesday with 6 victims of sexual abuse committed by priests in Chile, the papal spokesman has reported. The meeting had not been previously announced as a part of the Pope’s schedule.

“Today after lunch, the Holy Father met with a small group of victims of sexual abuse committed by priests, at the Apostolic Nunciature in Santiago. The meeting was strictly private, and there was no one else present: only the Pope and the victims. In this way, the were able to share their sufferings with Pope Francis, who listened to them, and prayed and cried with them,” reported Greg Burke, director of the Vatican’s press office.

At a press conference from Santiago, Burke told reporters that the meeting lasted half an hour.

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January 16, 2018

Pope meets with abuse survivors, weeps with them in Chile

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Associated Press

January 16, 2018

By Peter Prengerman and Nicole Winfield

Pope Francis met on Tuesday with survivors of priests who sexually abused them, wept with them and apologized for the “irreparable damage” they suffered, his spokesman said.

The pontiff also acknowledged the “pain” of priests who have been held collectively responsible for the crimes of a few, Vatican spokesman Greg Burke told reporters at the end of the day.

Francis dove head-first into Chile’s sex abuse scandal on his first full day in Santiago that came amid unprecedented opposition to his visit: Three more churches were torched overnight, including one burned to the ground in the southern Araucania region where Francis celebrates Mass on Wednesday. Police used tear gas and water cannons to break up an anti-pope protest outside Francis’ big open-air Mass in the capital, Santiago.

Despite the incidents, huge numbers of Chileans turned out to see the pope, including an estimated 400,000 for his Mass, and he brought some inmates to tears with an emotional visit to a women’s prison.

But his meeting with abuse survivors and comments in his first speech of the day were what many Chileans, incensed by years of abuse scandal and cover-up, were waiting for.

Tens of thousands of jubilant Chileans turned out in droves for Pope Francis’ first public Mass, a huge gathering in the capital’s O’Higgins Park. Demonstrators marching against poverty clashed with riot police as they attempted to reach the celebration. (Jan. 16)

Burke said Francis met with a small group of abuse victims after lunch, listening to their stories and praying with them. The spokesman gave no details, other than to say the pope “listened to them, prayed with them and wept with them.”

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Pope meets victims of child sexual abuse in Chile, ‘cries with them’

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
Reuters

By Philip Pullella and Dave Sherwood

Pope Francis publicly expressed “pain and shame” on Tuesday over the rape and molestation of children by priests in Chile and later listened, prayed and cried at a private meeting with victims.

Vatican spokesman Greg Burke said the meeting took place in the Vatican embassy in Santiago.

“No one else was present. Only the pope and the victims,” the spokesman said. “This was so they could speak of their suffering to Pope Francis, who listened to them and prayed and cried with them.”

It was only the second time on his overseas trips that the pope has met victims of sexual abuse, although he has met some at the Vatican. The last meeting on a trip was in Philadelphia in 2015.

Burke declined to give details, but his statement came at the end of an intense day for the pope, during which he spoke of sexual abuse twice, once asking forgiveness for abuses he said had done “irreparable damage” to victims.

The Argentine pontiff made his first remarks at the presidential palace, La Moneda, an unusual choice because the pope usually talks about sexual abuse to Church leaders and not politicians.

But the scandal has gripped the nation, prompting many politicians to criticizes the Church in the staunchly Catholic country, where the crisis has scarred its credibility.

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‘Child Victims Act’ would bring hidden predators to justice

POUGHKEEPSIE (NY)
Poughkeepsie Journal

January 16, 2018

By Kathryn Robb

When I first heard the claims of child sexual abuse against Alabama’s disgraced former Senate candidate Roy Moore, I was sick to my stomach. But as a long-time advocate and abuse survivor, I was not surprised that such a predator was able to remain hidden in plain sight for so long.

Despite the national conversation turning to rampant, and previously unreported, sexual abuse, New Yorkers still live in a state with laws that diminish victims and protect predators. In fact, New York is one of the worst states to be a victim of child sexual abuse, on par with Alabama.

New York has among the most restrictive statute of limitations for child sexual abuse crimes – barring most victims in Dutchess County and across the state from taking their abuser to court after they turn 23 years old. For most victims, it takes decades to report sexual abuse from their childhood, and the current statute of limitations means many who come forward are still denied their day in court.

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Obispo encubridor de pederastas estuvo en misa del Papa

LIMA (PERU)
El Comercio

>>Bishop hiding pedophiles was at Mass of the Pope

January 16, 2018

Varios han mostrado su indignación al ver al obispo Juan Barros en la misa en donde el Sumo Pontífice manifestó “dolor” y “vergüenza” por el “daño irreparable” causado a los niños por sacerdotes pedófilos

El papa Francisco manifestó en su primera misa en Chile “dolor” y “vergüenza” por el “daño irreparable” causado a los niños por sacerdotes pedófilos. Pero gran parte del pueblo chileno está indignado.

Varios han mostrado su indignación al ver imágenes que circularon en las redes sociales en las que se observa al obispo Juan Barros, señalado como encubridor de un caso sobre pederastia, en la misa.

[Google Translation: Several have shown their outrage at seeing Bishop Juan Barros at the mass where the Supreme Pontiff expressed “pain” and “shame” for the “irreparable damage” caused to children by pedophile priests

The Pope Francis said in his first Mass in Chile “grief” and “embarrassed” by the “irreparable damage” caused to children by pedophile priests. But a large part of the Chilean people are outraged.

Several have shown their indignation when seeing images that circulated in the social networks in which Bishop Juan Barros is observed , indicated as a cover-up of a case on pedophilia, in the mass.

Barros co officiated the mass with Francisco, unleashing anger on Twitter. “The Pope asks for forgiveness, but Karadima’s concealer is at the O’Higgins Park mass, while the victims did not want to receive them,” says Víctor Pacheco in a tweet.

“If the Pope leaves Chile without the commitment to investigate the complicity of the leaders of the Church, distrust with the Church is going to worsen,” says Anne Barrett Doyle, co-director of BishopAccountability in a statement.

Juan Barros took office amid controversy and protests for his closeness to priest Fernando Karadima. He has been consistently classified as the “concealer” of the condemned for sexual abuse of minors.

The Pope has arrived in the most critical country in Latin America with the Catholic Church and in full social change: he has just approved the therapeutic abortion and is filing homosexual marriage in the Parliament after the adoption of the civil union of same-sex couples and the one gender identity law.

The pontiff’s agenda in Santiago also highlights a visit to a women’s prison, a meeting with religious in the Cathedral of Santiago, which is expected to talk about sexual abuse, a private visit to the sanctuary of San Alberto Hurtado and a meeting with young people.]

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Anne Barrett-Doyle: “Cuando un obispo chileno pase un día en la cárcel, van a haber cambios en la iglesia chilena”

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
AméricaEconomía

>>Anne Barrett-Doyle: “When a Chilean bishop spends a day in jail, there will be changes in the Chilean church”

January 15, 2018

By Cristian Aránguiz

La experta estadounidense es una de las voces más autorizadas a nivel mundial en casos de abusos sexuales dentro de la iglesia católica. Ha apoyado importantes investigaciones, como las que se realizaron sobre el Arzobispado de Boston y que hicieron renunciar al poderoso cardenal Bernard Law, lo que años después daría origen a la premiada película “Spotlight”. Hoy, con la llegada a suelo chileno de la máxima autoridad de la Iglesia Católica, Barrett-Doyle le hace un llamado al Papa a dar respuestas a las víctimas de las violaciones y a reflexionar sobre las actitudes de las autoridades locales que protegen a los agresores.

Bishop Accountability es una ONG de origen estadounidense que recopila información global sobre miembros de la Iglesia Católica acusados de abuso sexual o violación de menores. En medio de la visita papal a Chile, la sede de la Fundación para la Confianza sirvió como comando central para que Anne Barrett-Doyle, líder de Bishop Accountability, entregara de manera pública los antecedentes que han recopilado sobre sacerdotes o miembros de la Iglesia Católica chilena acusados de realizar abusos sexuales o violaciones en contra de menores de edad.

La lista íntegra se encuentra, para su revisión, en el sitio https://www.bishop-accountability.org, donde se consignan 79 casos nacionales.

[Google Translation: “The Chilean government needs to carry out criminal investigations in the Catholic Church, to do that perhaps you start by creating laws that would enable them to persecute institutions like the Church or people within it,” the expert said of what the Catholic Church should do. Chilean state to be able to sanction new abuses.

The American expert is one of the most authoritative voices in the world in cases of sexual abuse within the Catholic Church. He has supported important investigations, such as those that were carried out on the Archbishopric of Boston and that made renounce the powerful Cardinal Bernard Law, which years later would give rise to the award-winning film “Spotlight”. Today, with the arrival on Chilean soil of the highest authority of the Catholic Church, Barrett-Doyle calls on the Pope to give answers to the victims of the violations and to reflect on the attitudes of the local authorities that protect the aggressors.

Bishop Accountability is an American-born NGO that collects global information about members of the Catholic Church accused of sexual abuse or rape of minors. In the midst of the papal visit to Chile, the headquarters of the Foundation for Trust served as a central command for Anne Barrett-Doyle, leader of Bishop Accountability, to publicly release the background they have gathered about priests or members of the Catholic Church. Chilean women accused of carrying out sexual abuse or rape against minors.

The full list is available for review at https://www.bishop-accountability.org , where 79 national cases are recorded.

Q. What actions should be taken to avoid the concealment of sexual aggressors, either from civil society or within the clergy?

A. From the interior of the church there must be a law so that any bishop or anyone who knows of any abuse, must report them immediately and safely. But we believe that the real answer comes from outside the church, from secular organizations, from the prosecutors of justice who are the ones who should and can get involved to solve. When a Chilean bishop spends a day in jail, there will be changes in the Chilean church.

Q. Have the necessary measures been taken today, from the Vatican headquarters, to prevent sexual abuse by its officials?

A. I do not think so. Today the Vatican does not yet have a policy of zero tolerance for abuse. But not only that, but it promotes those people to better positions, like what is happening here in Chile.

Q. Pope Francis announced a policy of zero tolerance, has it been fulfilled?

A. Pope Francis has promised “zero tolerance” for the crimes of abusers or sexual harassers. He has said that the protection of minors is the highest priority for the Catholic Church, but here in Chile the bishops and higher authorities do not follow that promise.

Q. What policy, then, has the Chilean church maintained in cases of abuse?

A. A bit unclear and in some cases keeps priests accused of sexual abuse in practice. In fact, at least two of the priests who appear in our base convicted on civil charges have been reinstated to the ecclesiastical exercise. Chilean bishops are unusual because they openly violate the standards of care and protections established by Pope Francis.

Q. Then, Pope Francis arrives in a country where his measures have not been met?

A. Clearly, the Vatican institution has shown itself in favor of bishops like Juan Barros, and former Monsignor Errázuriz, who have been accomplices, in some way, with the Karadima case and would normally be careful to say so, but there are documents and testimonies that establish These men are not fit to hold positions within the Church. If the Pope really wants to apply “zero tolerance” measures, he has to start by disciplining Church leaders who have put children in danger.

Q. What analysis do you make about the Chilean government’s actions on this matter?

A. The Chilean government needs to carry out criminal investigations in the Catholic Church. To do that perhaps should start to create laws that enable it to persecute institutions such as the Church or people within it.]

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Obispo Barros Tras Participar en Homilía del Papa: “Se Han Dicho Muchas Mentiras Respecto de lo Mío”

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
La Nación

>>Bishop Barros After Participating in the Pope’s Homily: “Many Lies Have Been Told about My Situation”

January 16, 2018

By Rodrigo Pérez Maldonado

Pese a las diversas protestas organizadas en su contra, el obispo de Osorno (acusado de encubrir los crímenes de Fernando Karadima) acompañó al sumo pontífice.

Sin duda la gran polémica de las últimas horas a nivel nacional ha sido la presencia del obispo Juan Barros en la homilía del Papa Francisco. Pese a las distintas protestas que se organizaron en su contra, el obispo de Osorno -acusado de encubrir los crímenes de Fernando Karadima- acompañó al sumo pontífice.

A su salida del Parque O’Higgins, recinto en que se llevó a cabo la multitudinaria misa, la autoridad eclesiástica fue abordada por medios de prensa y fue enfático en sus declaraciones. “Se han dicho muchas mentiras respecto de lo mío”, remarcó, agregando que “la verdad es muy importante y la verdad es lo que tiene que primar”.

De igual modo, expresó que se sintió “sorprendido” por la carta de 2015 -conocida la semana pasada- donde el papa sugería que tomara un período sabático.

Barros dijo además que “mucha gente reza por mí y me manda mucho cariño“. En tanto, consultado sobre la visita del sumo pontífice, indicó que “el papa es grandísimo y su visita es de un provecho enorme. El papa ha sido muy afectuoso conmigo”.

Luego de estas declaraciones, surgieron diversas reacciones. El periodista Juan Carlos Cruz, una de las víctimas de Karadima, escribió en su cuenta de Twitter: “El Papa pide perdón por abusos en La Moneda. Otro buen titular que saca aplauso y ahí se queda. Otro titular barato. Basta de perdones y más acciones. Los obispos encubridores ahí siguen. Palabras vacías. Dolor y vergüenza es lo que sienten las víctimas”.

Por su parte, Rolando Jiménez, vocero del Movilh, subió el siguiente mensaje: “Papa pide perdón por abusos y en Parque O´Higgins está el protector de Karadima nombrado Obispo por este mismo Papa. Coherente ¿no?”.

También Marta Larraechea, esposa del ex Presidente Eduardo Frei Ruiz-Tagle, criticó al pontífice en su cuenta de Twitter: “Barros participa de la ceremonia en Parque O’Higgins, qué vergüenza. ¿De qué pide ‘disculpas’ el Papa? No le creo nada, dice una cosa y hace otra”.

[Google Translation: Despite the various protests organized against him, the Bishop of Osorno (accused of covering up the crimes of Fernando Karadima) accompanied the Supreme Pontiff.

No doubt the great controversy of the last hours at the national level has been the presence of Bishop Juan Barros in the homily of Pope Francis. Despite the various protests organized against him, the Bishop of Osorno – accused of covering up the crimes of Fernando Karadima – accompanied the Supreme Pontiff.

On leaving the O’Higgins Park, where the mass was held, the ecclesiastical authority was approached by the press and emphatic in its statements. “Many lies have been said about my own,” he said , adding that “the truth is very important and the truth is what has to prevail.”

Similarly, he said he was “surprised” by the letter of 2015 – known last week – where the pope suggested he take a sabbatical.

Barros also said that “many people pray for me and send me a lot of love .” Meanwhile, consulted about the visit of the Supreme Pontiff, he indicated that “the Pope is great and his visit is of enormous benefit. The Pope has been very affectionate with me. ”

After these statements, various reactions emerged. The journalist Juan Carlos Cruz, one of the victims of Karadima , wrote on his Twitter account: “The Pope apologizes for abuses in La Moneda. Another good owner who gets applause and stays there. Another cheap holder. Enough of forgiveness and more actions. The hiding bishops there follow. Empty words. Pain and shame is what the victims feel. ”

For his part, Rolando Jiménez , Movilh spokesman, uploaded the following message: “Pope apologizes for abuses and in Park O’Higgins is the protector of Karadima appointed Bishop by this same Pope. Coherent, right? ”

Also Marta Larraechea , wife of former President Eduardo Frei Ruiz-Tagle, criticized the pontiff on his Twitter account: “Barros participates in the ceremony at Parque O’Higgins, what a shame. What does the Pope “apologize” for? I do not believe anything, says one thing and does another. ” ]

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Berríos y Puga rechazan presencia de Juan Barros en misa papal

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
diarioUchile

>>Berrios and Puga reject the presence of Juan Barros in papal mass

January 16, 2018

By Paula Campos

Justo cuando la transmisión oficial captó la presencia del obispo Juan Barros en la misa del Parque O´Higgins, se iniciaron las críticas por la permanencia del sacerdote en su cargo y su presencia en la misa papal.

Antes de que el Papa Francisco arribara al país distintas voces cercanas a la iglesia católica insistieron en la necesidad de que Juan Barros, obispo de Osorno, abandonara su cargo para no ser una mancha en el viaje apostólico iniciado este lunes 15 de enero. Sin embargo, aquello no ocurrió.

Desde su nombramiento, en enero de 2015, el obispo de la Diócesis de Osorno se ha visto envuelto en polémicas, todas apuntando al presunto encubrimiento de abusos sexuales y su cercanía con Fernando Karadima, sacerdote condenado canónicamente por cometer estos delitos contra menores.

Exactos dos años después de su nombramiento y luego de innumerables acciones encabezadas por un grupo de laicos de la sureña ciudad, el sacerdote asistió a la misa masiva del Parque O´Higgins, haciendo uso de su derecho por ser obispo titular, compartiendo suelo con aquellos que públicamente han pedido su salida.

[Google Translation: Just when the official transmission captured the presence of Bishop Juan Barros at the O’Higgins Park mass, criticisms were initiated for the priest’s continued presence and his presence at the papal mass.

Before Pope Francis arrived in the country, several voices close to the Catholic Church insisted on the need for Juan Barros, bishop of Osorno, to leave his post so as not to be a stain on the apostolic journey begun on Monday, January 15. However, that did not happen.

Since his appointment in January 2015, the bishop of the Diocese of Osorno has been embroiled in controversy, all pointing to the alleged cover-up of sexual abuse and his closeness to Fernando Karadima, a canonically condemned priest for committing these crimes against minors.

Exactly two years after his appointment and after innumerable actions led by a group of laity from the southern city, the priest attended the massive mass of the O’Higgins Park, making use of his right to be titular bishop, sharing soil with those who have publicly asked for his departure.

Immediately the first reactions were generated, which pointed to the impertinence of his presence in the esplanade of the capital meeting center; also his explanations: “Many lies have been said about my own,” Barros said when he was dismissed from the mass, when he was approached by a group of journalists. The bishop accused of covering up Fernando Karadima added that “the truth is what is important. And the truth is what has to prevail. ”

Mariano Puga, one of the “workers’ priests” who is now a parish priest in Villa Francia, joined the protests of the parishioners, rejecting the permanence of Barros in his position. “Neither left-handers, nor fools” said the posters with which the laity responded to what Francisco I once pointed out to them when he ratified the questioned Juan Barros.

The Jesuit Felipe Berrios openly criticized the presence of the prelate in the Park: “He should have had dignity,” he said adding that his presence leaves a wound in the apostolic journey. “Leave the Pope in a difficult situation. It is violent for many people who are there. It violates me because it contradicts everything he said in Papa in La Moneda, “he said, referring to the pardon that the Supreme Pontiff asked for all cases of pedophilia carried out by the Chilean church.

In conversation with the Semáforo program, Álvaro Ramis, a theologian and doctor in Philosophy, recalled the controversy generated after the letter that Francisco himself wrote in 2015 was published. In the letter, the Pope shared with the nuncio Ivo Scapolo his determination to remove Barros and two other bishops from their positions, to leave the Chilean Catholic Church in a better position in relation to its parishioners, a plan that was rendered ineffective. appear by action of the Holy One’s envoy to Chile.

The presence of Barros in mass mass is already commented on internationally. Neighboring countries pick up the annoyance and surprise at the presence of the Bishop at the Mass, right after the speech offered by the Pope in La Moneda.]

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Barros, entre la renuncia y la rehabilitación

SANTIAGO (CHILE)
La Tercera

>>Barros, between renunciation and rehabilitation

January 16, 2018

By Juan Paulo Iglesias

La presencia del obispo de Osorno en los actos del Parque O’Higgins despertó dudas y polémicas. Para el biógrafo de Francisco lo que se vio fue la “rehabilitación del obispo Barros”.

“No será una visita simple”, dijo el secretario de Estado vaticano, Pietro Parolin, antes de embarcarse hacia Chile junto al Papa. Y los sucesos del segundo día de actividades lo dejaron claro, aunque fue otro tema el que concentró la atención de muchos vaticanistas que acompañan al Papa, más allá del pedido de perdón de Francisco por los abusos y el fuerte mensaje al clero que pronunció en la catedral: la situación del obispo de Osorno, Juan Barros.

La presencia del prelado en la misa que ofició el Pontífice sólo minutos después de su primer discurso en el Palacio de La Moneda fue el tema de varios medios especializados que cubren la visita y comentario obligado en la sala de prensa. Para el periodista Joshua McElwee, del National Catholic Reporter, la situación del prelado y la molestia contra Iglesia generó “una atmósfera en Santiago que no se había observado en ninguno de los otros 21 viajes” de Jorge Mario Bergoglio al extranjero en sus casi cinco años de Pontificado.

[Google Translation: The presence of the Bishop of Osorno in the acts of O’Higgins Park aroused doubts and controversy. For Francisco’s biographer what was seen was the “rehabilitation of Bishop Barros.”

“It will not be a simple visit,” said the Vatican secretary of state, Pietro Parolin, before embarking to Chile with the Pope. And the events of the second day of activities made it clear, although it was another issue that focused the attention of many Vaticanists accompanying the Pope, beyond the request for forgiveness of Francisco for the abuses and the strong message to the clergy that he delivered in the Cathedral: the situation of the Bishop of Osorno, Juan Barros.

The presence of the prelate in the Mass that the Pontiff officiated just minutes after his first speech at the Palace of La Moneda was the subject of several specialized media that cover the visit and forced comment in the press room. For the journalist Joshua McElwee, of the National Catholic Reporter, the situation of the prelate and the annoyance against the Church generated “an atmosphere in Santiago that had not been observed in any of the other 21 trips” of Jorge Mario Bergoglio abroad in his almost five years of Pontificate.

The letter of the Pope revealed only days before his arrival in Santiago and where he expressed to the Chilean bishops his concern for the subject – and whose content has not been denied by the Holy See – only came to feed more the climate of tension that has surrounded the situation. For the Vaticanista of the newspaper La Stampa, Andrea Tornielli, and one of the veterans of the papal trips, the document of 2015 reveals that the Pope had another idea and was well aware of the problem. “But it is also clear that the Pope can not remove a bishop just because people say so,” adds Tornielli, although “I believe that a man of faith would have to think about the good of his faithful and the diocese and that if he represents a matter of resistance, of division, I would have to recognize it and say I’m going for a year, two years, until the tension subsides. ”

However, other Vaticanists differ from Tornielli and claim that it is Francisco himself who is determined to keep it. “I think the plan has been to show that Barros is a bishop like the others,” says Pope biographer and founder of Catholic Voices, Austen Ivereigh, because according to him, “the Pope believes in his innocence.” “It was important for the Pope that Barros was present at today’s events and that he appear as one more bishop,” adds the British journalist.

Ivereigh goes even further: “I think that this fact, together with the fact that Bishop Barros gave several interviews, makes him consider what happened as the rehabilitation of Monsignor Barros.” In the same line of Ivereigh, other Vaticanists say that it is the Pontiff himself and not Barros who has shown a harder position for the prelate to continue in Osorno. For Tornielli, however, considering the consequences that the case has had and the situation in which the Chilean Church finds itself, “what would be needed would be a minimum of ecclesial awareness and knowing that none is indispensable (…). Humility would be the key to solving the case of Barros. “]

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